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eBook Kimchi  Calamari ePub

eBook Kimchi Calamari ePub

by Rose Kent

  • ISBN: 0060837705
  • Category: Growing Up and Facts of Life
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: Rose Kent
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (April 10, 2007)
  • ePub book: 1207 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1530 kb
  • Other: doc azw lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 922

Description

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. There are worse things in the world than being adopted. But right now Joseph can't think of one. Joseph Calderaro has a serious problem.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. His social studies teacher has given him an impossible assignment: an essay about ancestors.

Kimchi & Calamari Rose Kent To Mom, who always believed I would, and Dad, who taught me a little Latin Contents Not So Happy Birthday to Me The Evil Eye Niente per . To Mom, who always believed I would, and Dad, who taught me a little Latin.

Kimchi & Calamari Rose Kent To Mom, who always believed I would, and Dad, who taught me a little Latin Contents Not So Happy Birthday to Me The Evil Eye Niente per Niente. Not So Happy Birthday to Me. The Evil Eye. Niente per Niente.

They still tasted like the spice from the barbecue chips I’d wolfed down. You found something out about me, didn’t you?. I asked as we ran upstairs. You bet I did, he said. we waited for the computer to boot up, Nash told me about his new lab partner in science. I think she’s Korean, Joseph, no kidding. She’s really pretty and smart. I reminded him about Yongsu being the new kid in band and told him that was her brother. The Hans bought the Jiffy Wash, near my mom’s shop, I said

It sounds like a quirky food fusion of Korean and Italian cuisine, and it's exactly how Joseph Calderaro feels about himself. Why wouldn't an adopted Korean drummer-comic book junkie feel like a combo platter given: (1) his face in the mirror (2) his proud Italian family.

It sounds like a quirky food fusion of Korean and Italian cuisine, and it's exactly how Joseph Calderaro feels about himself. And now Joseph has to write an essay about his ancestors for social studies. All he knows is that his birth family shipped his diapered butt on a plane to the USA.

Kimchi and calamari by: rose kent. Повторите попытку позже.

There are worse things in the world than being adopted.

Kimchi & Calamari - Rose Kent. Like that’s supposed to make us want to join hands with other eighth graders from sea to shining sea, Steve whispered to me. Why wouldn't an adopted Korean drummer-comic book junkie feel like a combo platter given:(1) his face in the mirror (2) his proud Italian family. End of story.

Kimchi and calamari. It sounds like a quirky food fusion of Korean and Italian cuisine, and it's exactly how Joseph Calderaro feels about himself. Why wouldn't an adopted Korean drummer—comic book junkie feel like a combo platter given:

(1) his face in the mirror

(2) his proud Italian family.

And now Joseph has to write an essay about his ancestors for social studies. All he knows is that his birth family shipped his diapered butt on a plane to the USA. End of story. But what he writes leads to a catastrophe messier than a table of shattered dishes—and self-discovery that Joseph never could have imagined.

Comments

Kikora Kikora
Life is great for Joseph Calderaro on the last day of his thirteenth year. Then, on his fourteenth birthday, disaster (call it, really, an obstacle) strikes. His writing teacher assigns an ancestry paper--you know, explore your roots. You see, by nurture, Joseph is thoroughly Italian--until he looks in the mirror. Then he sees who he really is--by nature--Asian of some sort, Korean to be exact. Joseph Calderaro is adopted.

"Kimchi & Calamari" is a thought-provoking novel written for the middle school crowd. Who am I, really? What I feel inside? What I see in the mirror? Yes, this is a first novel by a talented writer, Rose Kent, a novel which asks that universal question: Just who am I? On his fourteenth birthday Joseph gets fresh, fried calamari (squid if you don't know), prepared by his Italian-American mom, just-so-fresh. How fresh? Fresh off the dock from a day's fishing--the only and best way to eat squid.

(I ate my first squid at a little restaurant in Venice, supposedly the catch of the day. After reading this novel and the description of its fried calamari, I have mentally backtracked and now know my squid was not caught the day I ate it. It was rubbery! I'm game (ha ha--the pun in that word) for most things, including squid, but not a rubbery substance that wouldn't chew into pulverized bits.)

In his eighth-grade English class his teacher assigns an ancestry paper, a trace-your-roots paper as part of a national celebration and essay contest. Thus begins Joseph's search for his roots, the main problem of this juvenile fiction. Typically, other problems arise--just as in real life. In this case, Joseph wants to ask to the movies the most beautiful, athletic, popular, and rich girl in class, Kelly. Although he is too modest to tell his readers, but Joseph, the first-person narrator, is both funny and popular and cute. Kelly does accept. (But, of course, you are perceptive enough to know that Kelly's "looks" are just skin deep and that he will discover this fact by novel's end. Ah, come on, this is nearly always the outcome of this plot line. Consider this: I'm not telling how.)

His Korean heritage? All he knows is that he was left in a basket at the door of the police station in his home town and adopted when he was a baby. So how does he trace his ancestry without his parents finding out and being hurt by his search? His best friend Nash, a computer guru, volunteers to help him search via the web, where he finds Jae, who might have information about his birth mother.

Although teetering on senior citizen status, I enjoyed this book (as I do most well-written young adult books with interesting plots, characters, and situations. Although light-hearted, "Kimchi & Calamari" does raise a number of serious issues with personal identity as the central one. How DOES a Korean boy by birth discover that identity when he has sensitive, die-hard Italian parents? That, dear reader, is a wonderfully handled problem, and one well worth reading.

Kimchi? Oh yes, the "other" food of the title? Pickled cabbage, a food closely identified with Korean heritage as calamari is with Italians.

"Kimchi & Calamari" is one of the titles on the list of books in the Louisiana Young Readers Choice Award promotion. There are two prongs, this one for grades 6-8. Every state library system is involved in this reading campaign.
Beahelm Beahelm
Joseph Calderaro is a pretty typical 8th grader. He also happens to be adopted. He was abandoned in Korea as a baby and adopted by an Italian-American family from New Jersey.

When his social studies teacher assigns an ancestry essay, Joseph begins to examine who he is - and to ask questions he has never asked before, questions that his adoptive parents may not be willing or able to answer.

At first, Joseph's parents don't understand his confusion about his identity. After a few struggles, they begin to support his search for his roots.

A sensitive portrayal of common issues faced by adoptive families.
Galanjov Galanjov
Good book
Sermak Light Sermak Light
Great book! My 12 year old daughter was completely enthralled and discussed its contents at length!
cyrexoff cyrexoff
Great book
Granigrinn Granigrinn
My older son loves this book, and I bought for my younger daughter this time.
Uaha Uaha
Great book for young people that are trying to identify their multiethnic background. It was also a fun,easy, and fast read.
VERY GOOD BOOK FOR KIDS,AND FAMILY, AND MY SON LOVES IT,HAVE A LOT VOCABULARY AND HAS A LOT OF DETAILS.