cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Not in Room 204: Breaking the Silence of Abuse
eBook Not in Room 204: Breaking the Silence of Abuse ePub

eBook Not in Room 204: Breaking the Silence of Abuse ePub

by Shannon Riggs

  • ISBN: 0807557641
  • Category: Growing Up and Facts of Life
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: Shannon Riggs
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Albert Whitman & Company; First Printing edition (January 1, 2007)
  • Pages: 32
  • ePub book: 1965 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1771 kb
  • Other: azw lit mbr docx
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 435

Description

Not in Room 204 book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Not in Room 204: Breaking the Silence of Abuse as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Not in Room 204 book. At a report card conference, Mrs. Salvador tells Regina's mom that. Start by marking Not in Room 204: Breaking the Silence of Abuse as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

This helpful book provides a tool for adults to gently discuss sexual abuse with young children. If you are a parent, caregiver, family member or teacher, please read Not In Room 204 to your children. I would love to see this read from pre-school through first grade classes.

Not in Room 204 is her first book. Shannon is a member of Willamette Writers and SCBWI. She organizes a monthly children's writers' workshop in Oregon where she now lives with her husband, a retired US Navy officer

Not in Room 204 is her first book. She organizes a monthly children's writers' workshop in Oregon where she now lives with her husband, a retired US Navy officer. Jaime Zollars began making art at a young age. She got her BFA in Illustration from the Art Center College of Design. Jaime has illustrated children’s books, magazines, newspapers, and ad campaigns. She lives in Maryland with her husband and son. Mrs. Salvador is one tough teacher. But Regina Lillian Hadwig, a very quiet student, doesn’t mind. Not in Room 204. Written by Shannon Riggs and illustrated by Jaime Zollars. Salvador tells Regina’s mom that Regina is doing a great job, but that she is very quiet. Are you quiet at home, like you are in school? Mrs. Salvador asks Regina. Published by Albert Whitman and Company. Thrive Online: A New Approach for College Educators. Shannon Riggs.

Not in Room 204. Breaking the Silence of Abuse. Shannon Riggs grew up in New York. Not in Room 204 is her first book. Illustrated by Jaime Zollars.

Author: Riggs, Shannon. Many products and services offer Lexile measures for their books and reading materials. We are working with the hundreds of companies that partner with us to transition them to the more precise Lexile measures

Author: Riggs, Shannon. Early-Reading Indicators. We are working with the hundreds of companies that partner with us to transition them to the more precise Lexile measures. For more information on these enhancements and matching beginning readers with texts, visit lexile.

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next show all). 5. The Not in Room 204 is a book about preventing, recognizing, and responsible reactions to sexual abuse

Showing 1-5 of 6 (next show all). This book was very hard to read, and I can honestly say that I almost threw up while reading it. Coming from my own experience, I recognized what was going on fairly early in the book, and wasn't sure if I was going to be able to continue. As uneasy as I felt, I pushed through because I know that I am an advocate for student's safety and well-being. The Not in Room 204 is a book about preventing, recognizing, and responsible reactions to sexual abuse. Most importantly, a teacher tells the children in her class to talk to an adult if they are being sexually abused. So, the message is quite strong and brought to light.

1 volume : 27 cm. A teacher tells the children in her class to talk to an adult if they are being sexually abused. Oregon Book Award for Children's Literature, 2007. Donor challenge: For only 3 more days, your donation will be matched 2-to-1. Triple your impact! To the Internet Archive Community, Time is running out: please help the Internet Archive today.

At a report card conference, Mrs. Salvador tells Regina's mom that Regina is doing a great job, but that she is very quiet. Regina thinks of the secret she keeps so quiet--the one even her mom doesn't know, about the secret things her father does.

Comments

Zamo Zamo
You have to love Mrs. Salvador--she runs a tight ship without being a Viola Swamp kind of teacher. She has high expectations for her students, and she makes this clear on the first day of school. She's consistent in enforcing consequences and making her students take responsibility for their actions. It's clear that Regina Lillian Hadwig (shame on Riggs for this name--not one that flows easily off the tongue when reading aloud, and Riggs consistently uses the girl's full name!!) likes Mrs. Salvador for the stability and structure provided at school. We learn that Regina's dad is doing things to Regina at home that Regina is very quiet about, but Riggs doesn't specifically mention molestation, inappropriate touches, or sexual abuse, which makes it a little hard for kids to grasp what's going on and how serious it is. Adults can understand why Regina doesn't want to be out of school for 3 weeks for winter break, but Mr. Hadwig's inappropriate actions aren't highlighted enough by Riggs for kids to make the connection. It's AWESOME that Riggs has Mrs. Salvador share the message that strangers aren't the only predators, because the "Stranger Danger" message a lot of us grew up with is grossly inaccurate. Mrs. Salvador's message to her students is that if any of them are being abused, she "knows exactly what to do." (No details, but they aren't necessary here.) Regina discloses the abuse to Mrs. Salvador without actually saying the words, which IMO is good, because it lets kids know that adults can hep make disclosures easier, because we can fill in some of the blanks for them. The ending is a little abrupt and awkward, because the fill-in-the-blanks disclosure happens, and Regina is immediately at peace with the new school day ahead. No tears, no second-guessing herself for disclosing, no anxiety about what Mrs. Salvador is going to do or when, no anxiety about having to go home after making the disclosure--very unrealistic. And I get the message is that Regina trusts Mrs. Salvador, and I agree that Mrs. Salvador is a cool lady--but she isn't THAT good!
Gandree Gandree
The theme of the book is not only important one, but the artwork is absolutely stunning. The overall design is also great. This book is an excellent example of design, illustration and text working tgether artfully and seamlessly.

The writing is excellent - there is a fair amount of text, but somehow it feels very economical -- every word is well-chosen. The subject matter is handled extremely well and with a lot of sensitivity, but it in no way panders to the reader at all. The writing assumes intelligence of the reader. The illustrations do, too - they sometimes tell additional 'story' not outlined in the text, but always in an understated, gracious way. I agree with the other reviewer that this is an important book -- every library should really have a copy of this book.
Xal Xal
A good story for child sexual abuse prevention programs. Thank you!
White gold White gold
If you are a parent, caregiver, family member or teacher, please read Not In Room 204 to your children. I've been researching books to read to young children about what is not allowed to happen to them and this is by far the best book I've found. I would love to see this read from pre-school through first grade classes.
Kulasius Kulasius
This is a wonderful resource! I work with children around child sexual abuse prevention education and this is a wonderful book for launching meaningful discussions.
Umor Umor
I read this to my 4th grade students in my life skills classes after talking about good and bad secrets. They really liked it! I also liked it stated that strangers are not the only people to look out for, most often it is someone you know.
Umdwyn Umdwyn
I did not find any information till the very end, if I could I would give it a half star,it was really a horrible book
This is one of those books that is hard to read aloud to children, because it is so touching it bring tears to the eyes.
As a counselor, I plan to use it with children on an individual basis.
I think it would help kids feel more comfortable sharing uncomfortable things.