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eBook The Roman Army (Cambridge Introduction to World History) ePub

eBook The Roman Army (Cambridge Introduction to World History) ePub

by John Wilkes

  • ISBN: 0521072433
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: John Wilkes
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press (February 23, 1973)
  • Pages: 48
  • ePub book: 1506 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1375 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf docx rtf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 320

Description

Wilkes' introduction to the Roman army may be near to three decades old now but it is still te standard text on the Roman army

Wilkes' introduction to the Roman army may be near to three decades old now but it is still te standard text on the Roman army.

The Canbridge Introduction to History always has great reading. The book I purchased was an old worn book. Pages with related products. See and discover other items: history of roman empire, introduction to humanities. There's a problem loading this menu right now.

Series: Cambridge Introduction to Roman Civilization. Paperback: 328 pages. The book entitled ''The Roman Warfare'' written by the American historian Jonathan P. Roth has a cross-sectional character and briefly summarizes all major campaigns in which Roman Army was involved across its complex history.

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The Roman Army (Cambridge Introduction to World History). Discusses the way of life, training, and equipment of the Roman army and examines the duties of officers and soldiers of the legion. Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9780521072434. Release Date:February 1973.

For you veterans of Roman military history, however, this book probably doesn't have anything new for yo. Wilkes' introduction to the Roman army may be near to three decades old now but it is still te standard text on the Roman army

4 people found this helpful. Wilkes' introduction to the Roman army may be near to three decades old now but it is still te standard text on the Roman army.

The Cambridge World History is a seven volume history of the world in nine books published by Cambridge University Press in 2015. The history takes a comparativist approach.

The Cambridge History of Greek and Roman Warfare. Dilke, O. A. W. (1971) The Roman Land Surveyors: An Introduction to the Agrimensores. Scheidel, Walter 2012. The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Economy. The Cambridge Ancient History. Dobrawa, E. (1986) ‘The frontier in Syria in the first century . in Freeman, and Kennedy, (ed.

Discusses the way of life, training, and equipment of the Roman army and examines the duties of officers and soldiers of the legion.

Cambridge Introduction to Roman Civilization. Cambridge Library Collection - Classics. Greek Culture in the Roman World. Guides to the Coinage of the Ancient World. Key Conflicts of Classical Antiquity. Cambridge Studies in the Dialogues of Plato. The Cambridge World History of Slavery. Classics after Antiquity. Companions to Ancient Thought. The Greek Cosmologists. Key Themes in Ancient History.

Discusses the way of life, training, and equipment of the Roman army and examines the duties of officers and soldiers of the legion

Comments

Lanin Lanin
I have had an interest in the Armies of Imperial Rome for four years now, and have read a lot of different books about them. I bought this one more for the sake of a young family member who shares that interest, and it will suit that purpose well.

Though it is pretty dated, this text is still very accurate in its information. It focuses primarily on the Roman Army under Traianus (Trajan, 98-117) and Hadrianus (Hadrian, 117-138), but makes mention of soldiers and tactics from the 1st-4th Centuries AD. It is a pretty short book, and doesn't waste a lot of time on jargon. It does not really make an attempt to entertain the reader, but at the same time is not dull to read (I read it in less than an hour).

The author summarizes the equipment and recruitment of the legionaries and the auxiliaries, and also takes a useful look at Roman artillery. Included are a useful chart showing the command organization of a legion, and maps showing the main recruitment areas for the 2nd Century Empire. There are a number of black and white photos as well as some interesting and well-done line illustrations of the troops, and the front and back covers both show reenactors of the Ermine Street Guard.

Overall, I would reccomend this book for either a young reader (maybe about 8-14) or an older person who is just now getting their feet wet in the study of the Roman Army. For you veterans of Roman military history, however, this book probably doesn't have anything new for you.
bass bass
The Roman Army is a wonderful little book. I say little because it is only about 48 pages, but those pages are packed full of information, and colorful illustrations.

Wilkes provides accurate details and gives enough information on training, legion formations, legionnaire duties, construction of the camps, and the legionnaire's weapons to equip someone new to this area of study. If you are well-versed in the Roman armies of the times, this might serve as a good refresher, but it is perhaps best used by a younger reader who is new to the area of study. That is where I found it most valuable, as my younger son, who was thirteen at the time, showed interest in Roman history. It was both easy reading and informative.

The period covered spreads a few centuries but deals mostly with the empire during the reigns of Hadrian and Trajan, a bright time for the empire, and a good time to be in the legion.

I will state it again--this book is not for a person well-versed in the history of the Roman Army. This book is better suited to someone new to the field, or a younger student of Roman military history. This book shines in its simplicity and brevity.
Bort Bort
I was looking for an introductory book to help kickstart my research into the Roman army. So I bought Wilkes's little paperback.

It is indeed an insightful, knowledgeable and easy text. Part of the interest (and fun) in reading this book was the enjoyment I took in Wilkes's writing style (and tone): one of a school teacher giving a (young) classroom a lesson in "soldiering". Great quote/example from The Roman Army: "....by the way, the Latin name for military sandals was caligae. The Emperor Gaius wore them as a child, in camp with the soldiers, so he was nicknamed Caligula "little boot". He grew up to be a nasty piece of work".

A lot of it also seemed dated - there appears to many subsequent books on the subject that fill in gaps that Wilkes claims "are unknowns". And the illustrations look like they were done by the imaginary classroom I alluded to earlier....terrible!
Vetitc Vetitc
Wilkes' introduction to the Roman army may be near to three decades old now but it is still te standard text on the Roman army. Clearly written and well supported by the ancient evidence, it is an excellent book for both graduate and undergraduate student and a good beginning point for further research if one makes sure to review more current scholarship.