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eBook Escape from Saigon: How a Vietnam War Orphan Became an American Boy ePub

eBook Escape from Saigon: How a Vietnam War Orphan Became an American Boy ePub

by Andrea Warren

  • ISBN: 0374400237
  • Category: History
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: Andrea Warren
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Square Fish; 1st edition (September 2, 2008)
  • Pages: 128
  • ePub book: 1154 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1853 kb
  • Other: rtf mbr lit rtf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 394

Description

author & journalist. We Rode the Orphan Trains. The Nonfiction Minute. School Library Journal: A personal story. so well written that it will be sure to hold readers’ attentio. .

Melanie Kroupa books. Chronicles the experiences of an orphaned Amerasian boy from his birth and early childhood in Saigon through his departure from Vietnam in the 1975 Operation Babylift and his subsequent life as the adopted son of an American family in Ohio. Little boy all alone - New life in Saigon - Home at Holt - Family for long - No way out - Crash of the C-5A - Operation babylift - Flight to freedom - Into the eye of the storm - Real American boy - Return to Vietnam - Afterword

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Escape from Saigon book. Escape from Saigon allows readers to experience Long's struggle to An unforgettable true story of an orphan caught in the midst of war. Over a million South Vietnamese children were orphaned by the Vietnam War.

An unforgettable true story of an orphan caught in the midst of warOver a million South Vietnamese children were .

Escape from Saigon allows readers to experience Long’s struggle to survive in war-torn Vietnam, his dramatic escape to America as part of Operation Babylift during the last chaotic days before the fall of Saigon, and his life in the United States as Matt, part of a loving Ohio family.

The book is written by Andrea Warren and was published 2004 by Library of Congress. The story of how a boy name Long came to an orphanage in Vietnam and was adopted by a family in America. The book is a true story about a boy named Long and his escape from Vietnam, told through Andrea Warren. I liked the statistics and words used in the book; the characters were believable and made me feel like I was right there in the story. However, I did not like that it was told from a second person. Like thousands other Vietnamese children, Long lost his parents in the war.

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Born in 1966 to a Vietnamese mother and an American father, Long spent his early years living first in Saigon and then a.

Born in 1966 to a Vietnamese mother and an American father, Long spent his early years living first in Saigon and then a rural Vietnamese village. On April 5, 1975, one day after the devastating crash of a C–5A cargo plane carrying 230 orphans and fifty adults out of Saigon, Long flew to America as part of Operation Babylift. He became the fourth and youngest son of the Steiner family of Ohio.

You are here Book Theme: Across Cultures: Asian Pacific American Heritage Stories About International Adoptions Refugees: Books for Middle Grades Refugee.

Escape from Saigon allows readers to experience Long's struggle to survive in war-torn Vietnam, his dramatic escape to America as part of "Operation Babylift" during the last chaotic days before the fall of Saigon, and his life in the United States as "Matt," part of a loving Ohio family. Book Theme: Across Cultures: Asian Pacific American Heritage Stories About International Adoptions Refugees: Books for Middle Grades Refugee Stories from Asia.

An unforgettable true story of an orphan caught in the midst of war

Over a million South Vietnamese children were orphaned by the Vietnam War. This affecting true account tells the story of Long, who, like more than 40,000 other orphans, is Amerasian -- a mixed-race child -- with little future in Vietnam. Escape from Saigon allows readers to experience Long's struggle to survive in war-torn Vietnam, his dramatic escape to America as part of "Operation Babylift" during the last chaotic days before the fall of Saigon, and his life in the United States as "Matt," part of a loving Ohio family. Finally, as a young doctor, he journeys back to Vietnam, ready to reconcile his Vietnamese past with his American present. As the thirtieth anniversary of the end of the Vietnam War approaches, this compelling account provides a fascinating introduction to the war and the plight of children caught in the middle of it.

Comments

Made-with-Love Made-with-Love
This is the true story of a young Ameriasian boy finds a new family in the United States. Being the son of a Vietnamese woman and an American man puts Long in a difficult position. Because of the war, many do not see Americans with an unbiased eye. When Long loses his mother and his grandmother can no longer support him, he goes to live in an orphanage run by a nonprofit organization from the United States. As the Communists get ever closer it, Holt International (the group running the orphanage) decides they must get the children out without delay (most of the children have been placed for adoption). The book follows the remarkable operation known as Babylift which helped get over two thousand children out of Saigon before the Communists arrived. The rest of the story follows Long's (Matt) experiences in adjusting to a new family and a new life.

This book beautifully compliments Inside Out & Back Again, giving the reader a glimpse of the Vietnam War from the perspective of a child. It also reveals that some good things were done by Americans as well as all the bad things we always here about happening during that war. The writing is clear and crisp and perfect for reading out-loud. This book gives the reader, especially a child reader, a chance to see some of the things that children experience around the world, and hopefully better appreciate the good things about living in the United States.
DEAD-SHOT DEAD-SHOT
I liked this book very much. The writer has done a great job of making the plight of Ameri-Asians very real. Because she and her husband had adopted a Vietnamese girl, she was led to write a factual book about the situation in Viet Nam just after the Americans left that country.
Yllk Yllk
A good read for anyone interested in the downtrodden, and are victims of war. I was there in 1969.
Cozius Cozius
This book gives enough detail that it can stand alone without and prior knowledge of the situation in Vietnam at the time of the fall of Saigon. It give a very understandable history to explain it. The story is very compelling and the author has a connection to Operation Babylift. I found it very difficult to find stories about Operation Babylift. I could find information but not many stories. This story is well written and it can be applicable to anyone from middle school on. I have had high school student that read it and thought it was very good.
Dagdalas Dagdalas
At first I thought the content would be too difficult for 2nd grade reader. It turned out my daughter loved it and started to care about orphan and the cause.
Haralem Haralem
I think this was a very good book even if I had to read it for history. It's hard to believe one boy could create such an impact on the Vietnam war.
Dreladred Dreladred
Very touching story based on true facts. I was able to visualize the pain and suffering experienced by orphans as they grappled with war, death and loss of identity.
It was good and it was interesting. It was cool to learn about and I enjoyed reading it. However, I thought that it needed a little bit more details about the people still remaining in Saigon.