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eBook Alcatraz versus the Evil Librarians (Alcatraz, No. 1) ePub

eBook Alcatraz versus the Evil Librarians (Alcatraz, No. 1) ePub

by Brandon Sanderson

  • ISBN: 0439925525
  • Category: Science Fiction and Fantasy
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: Brandon Sanderson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Scholastic Paperbacks; Reprint edition (November 1, 2008)
  • ePub book: 1987 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1302 kb
  • Other: txt lrf azw lit
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 300

Description

Home Brandon Sanderson Alcatraz vs. The Evil Librarians. Alcatraz Versus the Shattered Lens.

Home Brandon Sanderson Alcatraz vs. Alcatraz vs the evil li. .Alcatraz vs. The Evil Librarians, . Part of Alcatraz series by Brandon Sanderson. I realize the difficulty you must have gone through to obtain it-after all, no Librarian is likely to recommend it, considering the secrets it exposes about their kind. Actually, my experience has been that people generally don’t recommend this kind of book at all. It is far too interesting.

This is no work of fiction, nor is my name really Brandon Sanderson. Unfortunately, even with these precautions, I suspect that the Librarians will discover the book and ban it. In that case, our Free Kingdom Agents will have to sneak into libraries and bookstores to put it on shelves. Count yourself lucky if you’ve found one of these secret copies.

For my father Winn Sanderson, who bought me books AUTHOR’S FOREWORD I AM NOT A GOOD PERSON. Do no be fooled! This is no work of fiction, nor is my name really brandon sanderson.

The Alcatraz books are Brandon’s series of Middle Grade (5th–7th grade) fantasy books released by.

The Alcatraz books are Brandon’s series of Middle Grade (5th–7th grade) fantasy books released by Scholastic Press. Brandon intends to write five books in the series, though only four were commissioned by Scholastic. I especially recommend ALCATRAZ VERSUS THE EVIL LIBRARIANS to fourth- and fifth-grade readers who enjoy peculiar adventures mixed with fantasy and a little sentimental reuniting of loved ones. It just worked for me.

Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians is a juvenile novel written by American author Brandon Sanderson, published in October 2007 by Scholastic Press. The book is named after its main character, Alcatraz Smedry. Alcatraz Versus the Evil Librarians is a young adult novel about Alcatraz Smedry, a young teen who is always breaking things.

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Alcatraz Smedry Versus the Evil Librarians is Brandon's first book for kids Before I get to why I would recommend this book, let me first say that I fully understand why teachers and librarians would recommend it on the basis of the overwhelming.

Alcatraz Smedry Versus the Evil Librarians is Brandon's first book for kids. He writes and plays with swords in Provo, Utah. Before I get to why I would recommend this book, let me first say that I fully understand why teachers and librarians would recommend it on the basis of the overwhelming amount of direct reference to literary themes and techniques. To me, however, this was the weakest part of the entire book. Told in the first-person, Sanderson uses the fact that this is an autobiography to regularly break the fourth wall and directly expatiate on the methods of storytelling and writing.

Brandon Sanderson can write an instruction manual for a lawnmower and I’ll read it. (I actually have no reason at all to know how to use a lawnmower since I live in a high-rise condominium)

Jan 11, 2015 Patrick rated it it was amazing. Brandon Sanderson can write an instruction manual for a lawnmower and I’ll read it. (I actually have no reason at all to know how to use a lawnmower since I live in a high-rise condominium).

On his thirteenth birthday, foster child Alcatraz Smedry receives a bag of sand which is immediately stolen by the evil .

On his thirteenth birthday, foster child Alcatraz Smedry receives a bag of sand which is immediately stolen by the evil Librarians who are trying to take over. We’re dedicated to reader privacy so we never track you. We never accept ads. But we still need to pay for servers and staff.

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The evil Librarians are coming!A hero with an incredible talent...for breaking things. A life-or-death mission...to rescue a bag of sand. A fearsome threat from a powerful secret network...the evil Librarians.Alcatraz Smedry doesn't seem destined for anything but disaster. On his 13th birthday he receives a bag of sand, which is quickly stolen by the cult of evil Librarians plotting to take over the world. The sand will give the Librarians the edge they need to achieve world domination. Alcatraz must stop them!...by infiltrating the local library, armed with nothing but eyeglasses and a talent for klutziness.

Comments

Buge Buge
Did you know that Librarians were evil??? I’ve always suspected but didn’t know just how deep the conspiracy went until I read this book.

What does a writer do when he needs to get the creative juices going and take a break from one of the many serious tombs he is writing? Well if he is Brandon Sanderson he writes something completely and utterly different and a bit silly and makes fun of himself a little while doing it.

*** Now, you’re probably wondering about the beginning of the previous chapter, with its reference to evil Librarians, altars made from encyclopedias, and its general feeling of “Oh, no! Alcatraz is going to be sacrificed!” Before we get to this, let me explain something about myself. I’ve been many things in my life. Student. Spy. Sacrifice. Potted plant. However, at this point, I’m something completely different from all of those—something more frightening than any of them.
I’m a writer. ***

As an adult in my *cough*fouthir*cough*ties Middle Grade books aren’t my bread and butter. I actually rarely read them. HOWEVER….there are a few writers that can make a middle grade book just as fun for the adults as the kids…sorta like Bugs Bunny. Sanderson to my surprise (I’m not really sure why I was that surprised I love most of his stuff) now joins that very short list with Rick Riordan and J.K. Rowling as one of my favorite Middle Grade Authors.

This book is hi-LAR-i-OUS all the way though from beginning to end. There are so many funny instances and things happening throughout the story I laughed continuously. There is the continuous breaking of the 4th wall and side jaunts as our young Alcatraz talks to the reader. I loved almost all of them and the story was totally engaging for me all the way through.

*** I generally don’t recommend this kind of book at all. It is far too interesting. Perhaps you have had other kinds of books recommended to you. Perhaps, even, you have been given books by friends, parents, or teachers, then told that these books are the type you “have to read.” Those books are invariably described as “important”—which, in my experience, pretty much means that they’re boring. (Words like meaningful and thoughtful are other good clues.) If there is a boy in these kinds of books, he will not go on an adventure to fight against Librarians, paper monsters, and one-eyed Dark Oculators. In fact, the lad will not go on an adventure or fight against anything at all. Instead, his dog will die. Or, in some cases, his mother will die. If it’s a really meaningful book, both his dog and his mother will die. (Apparently, most writers have something against dogs and mothers.) ***

The Rundown:

Alcatraz is an orphaned boy who just turned 13 and realized that he has special powers and is needed to SAVE THE WORLD….sound familiar??? Well it is but he can’t fly or turn invisible, he doesn’t have super strength or the ability to transport himself across distances. No his special power is…..he can break things…tah dahhhhh. Your thinking that hey I too can break things and that doesn’t sound like it is all that special. Well you are wrong and you are probably a librarian or a hushlander who doesn’t understand the awesomeness of breaking things.

***“What kinds of things can you break?” Grandpa Smedry asked.
“All kinds of things,” I said. “Doors, electronics, tables. Once I broke a chicken.”
“A chicken?”
I nodded. “It was on a field trip. I got … kind of frustrated, and I picked up a chicken. When I put it down, it immediately lost all of its feathers, and from then on refused to eat anything but cat food.”***

Alcatraz isn’t the only one who has a superpower. No indeed everyone in the main line of his family can do something special. Like his Cousin Sing who can trip, a Grandfather who can be late and another cousin that….

*** “And what is your Talent?” I dutifully asked.
“I can say things that make absolutely no sense whatsoever.”
“I thought everyone here had that Talent,” I noted. Nobody laughed. Free Kingdomers never get my jokes.***

Don’t worry Alcatraz I got all your jokes and they were hilarious.

So as superpowers go they sound a little lame….but trust me, when you see how they work you will be AMAZED and ENTERTAINED. There are also knights, monsters made out of bad romance novels and glasses that you will be dying to get a pair of.

If you have read a Sanderson novel then you know that the world building and magic system is going to be great. It will be imaginative and inventive and there will be a twist. Even though this is a kid’s book….it is so not just a kid’s book. There is a little something for everyone and I can’t believe I waited so long to read these.

I bow down again to the writing Genius that is Sanderson and can’t wait to jump into the next book of the series. Fun for all ages.
Arlana Arlana
Why I Think Boys May Enjoy This

Before I get to why I would recommend this book, let me first say that I fully understand why teachers and librarians would recommend it on the basis of the overwhelming amount of direct reference to literary themes and techniques. To me, however, this was the weakest part of the entire book.

Told in the first-person, Sanderson uses the fact that this is an “autobiography” to regularly break the fourth wall and directly expatiate on the methods of storytelling and writing. To me, this is one of the biggest pet peeves I have with middle grade books that have a tendency to “talk down” to their intended audience with such direct and blatant exposition.

That being said, if these bits were removed (and could easily be done, since they are often in the beginning of chapters), the fantasy story *behind* this nonsense is quite brilliant. Alcatraz is a very relatable protagonist and the uniqueness of the world and the Smedry magical “talents” (all of which seem silly on the surface until their true usefulness comes into play). The duality of the world Sanderson built is also fantastic, between the Hushlands (eg, the world we know as filtered through the control of the Librarians) and the world as Alcatraz learns it to be.
As a parody writer, I am a fan of twisted tropes and fourth wall breaking, and Sanderson uses his “autobiography” method of storytelling to find plenty of ways to do this, seemingly referencing the silliness of several major fantasy stories throughout this telling. Overall, I really enjoyed this story and just wish he didn’t have the numerous bits that interrupted the flow of the story time and again.

Content/Appropriateness

This is more than appropriate for a middle grade (as low as 8 years) audience. There is no concern for language or sexual themes at all and there is minimal violence. There are references and scenes concerning torture and the violence is real, but nothing is described in too vivid or overly horrific detail as to make it unfit for young audiences.

Rating

3/5 Giant Cartoon Mallets from Toonopolis, The Blog's Books for Boys Review