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eBook Blackboard Bear: Library Edition ePub

eBook Blackboard Bear: Library Edition ePub

by Martha Alexander

  • ISBN: 0803706529
  • Category: Sports and Outdoors
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: Martha Alexander
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Dial Books (March 30, 1988)
  • ePub book: 1911 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1682 kb
  • Other: doc docx txt mbr
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 226

Description

Blackboard Bear book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read.

Blackboard Bear book.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's . by. Martha Alexander. 2nd ed. External-identifier.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library.

Author of Blackboard Bear, I sure am glad to see you, Blackboard Bear, Blackboard Bear, We're in big trouble, Blackboard . Martha Alexander is an author and illustrator who was born in Augusta, Georgia, on May 25, 1920.

Author of Blackboard Bear, I sure am glad to see you, Blackboard Bear, Blackboard Bear, We're in big trouble, Blackboard Bear, And my mean old mother will be sorry, Blackboard Bear, Move over, Twerp, Pigs say oink, We Never Do Anything. She attended the Cincinnati Academy of Fine Arts in Ohio from 1938 through 1942. Her marriage to Willson Stamper ended in divorce in 1959.

When a little boy is not allowed to play with the older children, he creates an imaginary friend by drawing a giant bear on his blackboard. When a little boy is not allowed to play with the older children, he creates an imaginary friend by drawing a giant bear on his blackboard.

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1969 by Martha Alexander. Second Pied Piper Printing. Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 69-17975 Printed in the United States of America. San rafael public library san rafael, california. For Christopher J. 'J.

Четыре медведя в коробку марта Александр циферблат пресс 1969 - 1980 (4) доски медведь. Состояние товара: Хорошее состояние.

Find nearly any book by MArtha Alexander. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. When the New Baby Comes, I'm Moving Out. ISBN 9780803795587 (978-0-8037-9558-7) Hardcover, Dial, 1979. Learn More at LibraryThing. MArtha Alexander at LibraryThing.

ISBN 10: 0744543991 ISBN 13: 9780744543995. Publisher: Walker Books Ltd, 1996. In the first full-color Blackboard Bear book, a boy wishes he could go to the moon-if only he knew how to build a spaceship. Of course his friend Blackboard Bear knows how! But going to the moon can be a little scary.

Blackboard Bear Hardcover – November 3, 1999. by Martha Alexander (Author, Illustrator). Book 1 of 6 in the Blackboard Bear Series. Story time just got better with Prime Book Box, a subscription that delivers hand-picked children’s books every 1, 2, or 3 months - at 40% off List Price.

Comments

Villo Villo
This is the first book I ever read from this author and fell in love with it. It has been part of my literary reading to my young students for over twenty years. I am overjoyed to have my own copy. YAY!!!!
Brick my own Brick my own
A little twisted, but funny none the less. My younger son (3 years) didn't get it until we pointed it out in the illustrations, but my 5 year old laughed herself silly
Vishura Vishura
The year is 1969. What is going on? Just in the month of January: The New York Jets defeat the Baltimore Colts in the Super Bowl. Elvis launches his comeback album which includes "Suspicious Minds" and "In the Ghetto." The Beatles give their last public performance on the roof of Apple Records. Chalkboards are still black. And sometime in 1969 Martha Alexander publishes her first "Blackboard Bear," a paean to imaginary friends.

The premise is simple and simply related mostly through illustrations (also by Alexander): Little brother wants to play with big brother and his friends, but, of course, is too little. The final insult: "Go play with your teddy bear."

Little brother is so hurt and disappointed that he throws teddy bear out the window (Remember in 1969 when we still left windows open?)

Now then, let's get serious. Pop into his head--the idea of an imaginary bear wearing a fierce red collar. A bear amenable ONLY to little brother's thoughts and desires. Hold my bear's leash? Not a chance. Pat my bear? No way. Ride my bear? "He only wants me to ride him."

Pay-backs. Imagination can do that. Is this a mean book? Not in any sense. Is this a cruel, vicious book--after all, Bear licks the figures of Big Brother and his friends drawn on the blackboard right down into his stomach. Along with the chalk-drawn pot of honey. Yum, all full.

Empowerment. That's what this book is about, temporary empowerment, something most children need from time to time. According to many writers (Freud, May, Estes, Strauss-Levi), fairy tales inculcate values and fill needs, among their many uses. Although, technically, "Blackboard Bear" is not a fairy tale, it serves the purpose of one.

In the process of "weeding," or ridding my school library of old, unread books, I found this one that hasn't been checked out in years. I read it to my kindergarten class for their feedback. They loved it. It stays! (A new copy would be nice, but when money is short, just put on a new mylar cover, discard the old, dirty one, and the book looks pretty good. I would love the entire series....maybe after the fall book fair!)

"Blackboard Bear"--a definite keeper!
Buge Buge
My son picked this book at the library. The illustrations were cute, and it was part of a series, so I thought it would be fun to start with this, the original book. My husband and I were both shocked and disappointed in the book. Here is the summary.
A little boy becomes an outcast based on his age and size. None of the other kids will let him join their reindeer games, so he makes his own imaginary friend--a large bear drawn on a blackboard. His friend is so cool that those same kids who had rejected him from their games want to join in. I was disappointed when the protagonist in turn rejects them on the basis of being too big, etc. The story takes an ugly turn in the end, when you discover that the imaginations of the little boy for his friend Blackboard Bear is that he is eating all of the boys who were unkind to him in the beginning of the story. I was horrified and sickened. What could have been a story about kindness, forgiveness, overcoming adversity in a healthy way, ends up as a story about bitterness, hatred, hurting people in turn, and ultimately choosing isolation instead of community. Not at all the principles or character that I hope to teach my children.
Vudogal Vudogal
When I was little I'd checked this book out of the library so many times my mom eventually bought me my own copy. I loved it so much, in fact, that I learned to read on this book! The games the kids play may be not socially acceptable anymore (cowboys & indians, cops & robbers), but they accurately capture the era in which the book was written and certainly pale compared to the book's payoff. A must-have!
Blacknight Blacknight
My 2 year old loves another blackboard bear book, so I got this one thinking she might like it. The story takes a creepy turn, though, with the bear eating the older kids who wouldn't include the main character in their playing. It's not explicit, but strongly suggested. I think this one might be going to the used bookstore.