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eBook Rising Voices ePub

eBook Rising Voices ePub

by Hirschfelder

  • ISBN: 0684192071
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: Hirschfelder
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Atheneum; 1st ed edition (June 30, 1992)
  • Pages: 115
  • ePub book: 1267 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1771 kb
  • Other: docx doc mbr azw
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 529

Description

The voices in this book are at times satiric, ironic, and resistant, but also celebrate the joys and beauty of the Indian peoples, their lands, and their cultures. The book I'm reading is rising voices.

The voices in this book are at times satiric, ironic, and resistant, but also celebrate the joys and beauty of the Indian peoples, their lands, and their cultures. A solid choice for both classroom use and individual reading. I picked this book because Native Americans wrote it. T his book has poems about young Natives. The story I'm reading is " I'm a Navajo".

Written by Arlene B. Hirschfelder and Beverley R. Singer, it is a wonderful book containing story's, knowledge and poetry of young Native Americans

Written by Arlene B. Singer, it is a wonderful book containing story's, knowledge and poetry of young Native Americans. These are very education and exciting sometimes to read. These young Native Americans have written stories and poetry about their lives and how they feel, containing a real and true perspective of what the English had done to them, what it was like to be taken away from families and forced Rising voices is an educational book about Native Americans.

Writings of Young Native Americans. By Arlene Hirschfelder and Beverly Singer. An astonishing collection of poems and essays written by young contemporary Native Americans

Writings of Young Native Americans. Category: Nonfiction. An astonishing collection of poems and essays written by young contemporary Native Americans. Words of protest against prejudice and oppression, poems of estrangement and pain, cries for lost worlds and lost identities - but also songs of celebration and joy for the future. People Who Read Rising Voices Also Read. Arlene Hirschfelder and Beverly Singer. Stay informed about books like Rising Voices and more from Penguin Random House. More from Arlene Hirschfelder. More from Beverly Singer. Writings of Young Native Americans. by Arlene Hirschfelder.

Books by Arlene B. Hirschfelder . Rising Voices: Writings of Young Native Americans. by Arlene B. Hirschfelder and Beverly R. Singer. Hirschfelder 6. Sort by. Number of Resources Number of Awards Book Title Year Published Word Count Reading Level: ATOS® Reading Level: Lexile®. Browse books by Arlene B. by Maya Ajmera, Yvonne Wakim Dennis, and Arlene B. Children of Native America Today. by Yvonne Wakim Dennis and Arlene B.

Arlene B Hirschfelder. Tell us if something is incorrect. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Rising Voices : Writings of Young Native Americans. Arlene B Hirschfelder. We aim to show you accurate product information.

Heed Their Rising Voices" is a 1960 newspaper advertisement published in the New York Times. It was published on March 29, 1960 and paid for by the "Committee to Defend Martin Luther King and the Struggle for Freedom in the South". The purpose of the advertisement was to attract attention and steer support towards Martin Luther King Jr. A recent felony charge of perjury was leveled against King and could have resulted in a lengthy imprisonment

We are Rising Voices. Learn more about our work and the communities that we support.

We are Rising Voices. Let's Rise! from Global Voices on Vimeo. Written by Rising Voices · LangsOnline.

Poems and essays from the pens of young native Americans express what it means to be Indian today, presenting their thoughts and feelings about racism and the struggles they encounter trying to incorporate Indian tradition into the modern world.

Comments

Virtual Virtual
I have been reading this to my adopted 8-year-old who is 1/4 Native American. Even though the book is directed at kids a little older she still enjoys it. Many of the items in the book reflect feelings of being different or feelings of isolation and/or discrimination. This applies to my daughter who is sensitive about being adopted, and she can see that many other children feel the way she does for many different reasons. The book also gives her valuable insight into her background.
Nilador Nilador
Bought for someone
Gholbithris Gholbithris
"Rising Voices: Writings of Young Native Americans" is an anthology of pieces selected by Arlene Hirschfelder and Beverly R. Singer. There are more than 60 entries, most of them very short. About 140 pages long, the anthology encompasses both poetry and prose. Each piece is accompanied by a short blurb which tells about the author and, if applicable, describes the piece's prior publication history.

The anthology has a wide scope. Its authors represent many parts of the United States: New Mexico, Alaska, Arizona, Utah, Montana, and other states. Also represented are many Indian nations: Coeur d'Alene, Inuit, Navajo, Cree, Pima, Zuni, etc. The pieces span over a century, from the 1880s to the 1990s. The book is divided into six thematic sections: "Identity," "Family," "Homelands," "Ritual and Ceremony," "Education," and "Harsh Realities."

Some of my favorite selections are as follows. "My Poems," by Alan Barlow: a poem with particularly vivid imagery. "My Role as a Native American," by Kimberly Kai Rapada: an ironic prose memoir about receiving a role in a school production of "The Wizard of Oz." "As I Dance," by Autumn White Clay: an evocative poem that celebrates dance. "Misconceptions about the Aleutians," by Katie Mobeck: a feisty prose piece that challenges stereotypes about the author's people.

Other topics covered include jewelry, food, prayer, role models, Native language, and the Indian relationship to the bison. A particularly important recurring theme is the tension that comes with living between the white and Indian worlds. As in other youth anthologies I have read, some of the pieces struck me as somewhat underdeveloped. But the overall strength of the collection is impressive. The voices in this book are at times satiric, ironic, and resistant, but also celebrate the joys and beauty of the Indian peoples, their lands, and their cultures. A solid choice for both classroom use and individual reading.
Delagamand Delagamand
How often does a teacher find a book that is written totally on the level of their students? This is a little anthology of essays and poetry written by Native American students. It gives such insight into what these young people feel and think. The thoughts are contemporary but show us the heritage and its importance - but also the struggle it can cause. These selections range from third grade through high school. I consider it a must for teaching multi-cultural lit. The thoughts can be compared to what the students feel - especially when it comes to heritage. Some are sad - some defiant - some confident and joyful. These will get students thinking and discussing. A treasure!
Thordibandis Thordibandis
The book I'm reading is rising voices. I picked this book because Native Americans wrote it. T his book has poems about young Natives. The story I'm reading is " I'm a Navajo". The kid that is telling us about him being Navajo and he said " he don't act like a Navajo and also he said that a Navajo wears a lot of necklaces and belts that's pin by a Navajo silversmith .He also said that his mom never live in a taught him how to pray and he has pray for a little girl when she got sick. He had long hair and he didn't care to knot it into a ponytail.

The little boy has to live like a Navajo for the whole summer. The Navajo boy is to learn how to be a Navajo and how to speak the Navajo way. The boy's mom told him to learn how to a Navajo and to show everyone that he can be a true Navajo. The kid had to become one of the people that can do ceremony on other people and the way he can do that is to learn how to become a Navajo. The boy turned 15 then he had to learn how to kill and skin a sheep.

The boy has a girlfriend that's all into Navajo ways her family do all of the Navajo stuff like pow wow and all the stuff that Navajo people like to do over the summer. The girl met his family and she notice that his family is not like her family. So they help the boy become a true Navajo. So she took him to a Hogan and lived in there for three weeks. He didn't like the way they ate their food. He said that they eat a lot of mutton and fry bread. So one day he had to try the food because that was the only thing they had to eat in three weeks living in a Hogan. He told her that he never been inside a teepee in his life. So later that summer he finally become a true Navajo. His family was so happy for him and what he did for the summer.