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eBook Arilla Sundown ePub

eBook Arilla Sundown ePub

by Virginia Hamilton

  • ISBN: 0241895480
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: Virginia Hamilton
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Hamish Hamilton Ltd; First U.K Edition edition (February 10, 1977)
  • Pages: 252
  • ePub book: 1571 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1665 kb
  • Other: lrf mbr txt rtf
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 679

Description

Arilla Sun Down is the Virginia Hamilton book I reread the most.

Arilla Sun Down is the Virginia Hamilton book I reread the most. I read it first when I was a teacher of seventh graders; I read it when my children were in seventh grade; I always read it when I give book talks about children's books; I read it also when I am working with Native American books with students. We read books that are for children or adolescents-but also for adults. They are books for everyone, just good books. I don't think Arilla Sun Down is a children's book; it's a book that children might read, if adults introduce them to it. Mostly it's a book that focuses on a family and particularly on the children in that family.

An American Library Association Notable Book and a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year:Twelve-year-old Arilla goes on a quest to discover who she is and where she fits into her family-and the world Arilla Adams is tired of being the moon to her older brother’s sun. Sixteen-year-old Jack has rejected being part of an interracial family and identifies only with his Native American heritage. But Arilla, also part African American and part Native American, isn’t so sure where she belongs. She knows there are people who care about her. Old James False Face tells her stories.

Virginia Esther Hamilton (March 12, 1936 – February 19, 2002) was an African-American children's books author. She wrote 41 books, including M. C. Higgins, the Great (1974), for which she won the . National Book Award in category Children's Books and the Newbery Medal in 1975

Arilla Sun Down book.

Arilla Sun Down book. 272 pp. Pub: 10/95  . I first started reading Virginia Hamilton's books over 20 years ago, and if the author were still living today, I'd send her my gratitude on being a gateway for my love of reading (and I appreciated the brief bio and photo montage provided at the end of this book). My childhood library had several of her books, notably with the covers that were designed in the 70s and 80s (maybe a few that were a part of the 90s reissues).

by. Hamilton, Virginia, 1936-2002. Indians of North America. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. New York : Scholastic. Uploaded by KellyCritch on December 7, 2009.

by Virginia Hamilton. An American Library Association Notable Book and a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year: Twelve-year-old Arilla goes on a quest to discover who she is and where she fits into her family-and the world. Arilla Adams is tired of being the moon to her older brother’s sun. An American Library Association Notable Book and a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year:Twelve-year-old Arilla goes on a quest to discover who she is and where she fits into her family-and the world

by Virginia Hamilton. An American Library Association Notable Book and a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year:Twelve-year-old Arilla goes on a quest to discover who she is and where she fits into her family-and the world. She knows there are people who care about.

Her relatives always visit, and everyone cooks, bakes, and tells stories. An American Library Association Notable Book and a School Library Journal Best Book of the Year:Twelve-year-old Arilla goes on a quest to discover who she is and where she fits into her family-and the world Arilla Adams is tired of being the moon to her older brother's sun.

Comments

Dog_Uoll Dog_Uoll
Slow start, but good lesson on self-esteem.
Moronydit Moronydit
This is a subtle, moving story of a love/hate relationship between a twelve-year-old girl and her older brother. Arilla idolizes Jack, and at the same time resents and fears him. Seen through Arilla's eyes, Jack takes on an almost superhuman cast, thought more sophisticated readers will be able to see the vulnerabilities that underlie Jack's brave "Amerind" persona. Arilla's relationships with her parents are complex and multilayered, as are the relationships among Jack and the parents. There are no easy answers or obvious resolution in this novel, only the furthering of a young girl's maturity and understanding of the people around her.

"Arilla Sun Down" is marketed as a children's novel; the preteen protagonist should make it most appealing to middle schoolers. However, this apparent target audience may find this book difficult, if not impossible, to follow. The novel unfolds in a series of incidents, flashbacks, and memories, which are indicated only by subtle textual clues. Numerous details and several important plot points are implied rather than directly stated. There are reasonably intelligent adults I've known who don't have the literary sophistication to pluck the relevant details out of a text like this and draw the necessary inferences. Few middle schoolers will have the reading comprehension skills, or the patience.

What really gets on my nerves is. That Hamilton has this awful habit. Of chopping up sentences into fragments for no apparent reason. I'm all for literary license, but there seems to be no rhyme or reason to some of the sentence breaks in this novel. Poetic prose in a novel should serve to illuminate the characters' perceptions and experience, not draw attention to itself; the language in this book is often too self-conscious and awkward. This is unfortunate, because there are some truly beautiful passages of description ("All of the smells hang above the ridges and then seep down through the dark like a full-blown calamity") and insight ("it's the oddest feeling to go by a house that was yours once and have it not bother you particularly") that spotlight Hamilton's literary gifts. It's just too bad we have to wade through pages of sentences like "Now moves he and holding up stick through a fish" and "I can hardly stand the way it feels so real funny at first" to find them.
Axebourne Axebourne
Arilla Sun Down is the Virginia Hamilton book I reread the most. I read it first when I was a teacher of seventh graders; I read it when my children were in seventh grade; I always read it when I give book talks about children's books; I read it also when I am working with Native American books with students. I often read it aloud with students just to get them involved in it; the first part is a little different from most books; I like the way the words flow. Kids like the sibling rivalry of Arilla and her brother. I like the fact that Arilla comes from a home in which the mother is Native American and the father is African American--the bi-racial aspect. It's hard to find books with interracial families; this is one of the few and one of the best--if not the best. My female students like the parts about horses; my male students like the parts about Sun (Arilla's brother) finding his identity, being assertive when the townspeople are prejudiced against his family. All of my students like the boy-girl relationships and friendships. I recently introduced this book in my teachers book club. We read books that are for children or adolescents--but also for adults. They are books for everyone, just good books. I don't think Arilla Sun Down is a children's book; it's a book that children might read, if adults introduce them to it. Mostly it's a book that focuses on a family and particularly on the children in that family. This book is interesting because it reacquaints adults with their growing up years and tells us more about life itself at any age.