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eBook Anno's Aesop: A Book of Fables by Aesop and Mr. Fox (English and Japanese Edition) ePub

eBook Anno's Aesop: A Book of Fables by Aesop and Mr. Fox (English and Japanese Edition) ePub

by Mitsumasa Anno

  • ISBN: 0531057747
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: Mitsumasa Anno
  • Language: English Japanese
  • Publisher: Orchard Books; 1st US edition (April 1, 1989)
  • Pages: 63
  • ePub book: 1437 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1190 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi lrf doc
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 133

Description

Once again, Mistumasa Anno creates an awesome double story in Anno's Aesop. A boy, Freddy Fox, finds a book of Aesop's fables and begs his father to read them to him. The pages show both the pages of Aesop's fables and the words of the father as he "reads" it undearneath.

Once again, Mistumasa Anno creates an awesome double story in Anno's Aesop. The father creates stories to parallel the pictures. I always love the explanations in the back of Anno's books.

What When Freddy Fox finds a book in the woods, he takes it home to his father Mr. Fox, and asks him to read it. Here begins a delightful dual narrative, with the actual text of the "book" at the top of the page, and Mr. Fox's "reading" of it along the bottom. Mitsumasa Anno (born March 20, 1926) is a Japanese illustrator and writer of children's books, known best for picture books with few or no words.

Fables, Fables, Japanese, Fables, English. Translation of: Kitsune ga hirotta Isoppu monogatari. Presents an illustrated collection of Aesop's fables interwoven with Father Fox's own unique interpretations of the stories. New York : Orchard Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Kahle/Austin Foundation. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control).

Presents an illustrated collection of Aesop's fables interwoven with Father Fox's own unique interpretations of the stories.

Mitsumasa Anno (安野 光雅, Anno Mitsumasa, born 20 March 1926) is a Japanese illustrator and writer of children's books, known best for picture books with few or no words. He received the international Hans Christian Andersen Medal in 1984 for his "lasting contribution to children's literature. Anno was born in 1926 in Tsuwano, a small town in Shimane Prefecture, Japan and grew up there. As a student at a regional high school, he studied art, drawing, and the writings of Hermann Hesse.

Aesop's Fables: English to Japanese Translation.

Aesop is the author of short stories for children, with tales such as The Ant and the Grasshopper. Further complicating the history of Aesop and his Fables is that no writing from his hand has been found, and he’s only referenced by other authors, who speak of reading him. The Aesop Romance, a fictional biography of the storyteller, tells the story of Aesop as a slave in Samos who gains freedom from his master, then becoming a riddle solver for a king, before finally being forced to jump to his death after telling insulting fables in Delphi. It’s believed that Aesop was invented by a number of writers so his name could be synonymous with fable.

The classic telling of "Aesop's Fables" is matched by Mr Fox's interpretations of the pictures. The author also wrote "Anno's Peekaboo", "All in a Day", "Anno's Journey" and "Anno's Grim". Format Paperback 64 pages. Dimensions 216 x 262 x 5mm 214g. Publication date 26 Sep 1991. Publisher Penguin Books Ltd. Imprint Puffin Books. Publication City/Country London, United Kingdom. Illustrations note colour illustrations.

Presents an illustrated collection of Aesop's fables interwoven with Father Fox's own unique interpretations of the stories.

Comments

Gri Gri
Excellent!
Jek Jek
Love it.
Cildorais Cildorais
Perfect~!
Maveri Maveri
Quick! Name the best-known Japanese picture book author/illustrator read in the United States today! Give up? Well due to the fact that you've decided to look up a review of a book by the ever-popular Mitsumasa Anno, you've probably guessed the answer with minimal difficulty. Yes, Anno is the man I mean. Best known, perhaps, for his intriguing wordless books (highly recommended) the author's focus has shifted dramatically with this intriguing retelling of Aesop's classic tales. Creating a book that is as original as it is faithful to its sources, "Anno's Aesop" is a complex interweaving of text and reinterpretation.

To begin, we are told a story of little Freddy Fox. Running through the woods one day he stumbles across a book of Aesop's fables. After presenting this book to his father he yearns for the stories to be read to him. We are given the distinct impression that Mr. Fox doesn't know how to read, but he's not about to lose face in front of his son. The result is that Mr. Fox gives his own unique spin on the pictures that follow. As the book progresses we are given 2 stories (usually) per tale. At the top of the page, amid the illustrations, is the actual Aesop fable, complete with moral. At the bottom of the same page is Mr. Fox's tale. His versions are usually concerned primarily with small details that aren't readily apparent with the story's first telling. Therefore, a story about the goose that laid the golden egg and whose picture contains a cat is suddenly (in the Fox's version) in his version all about the feline. Children reading these fables are given a choice of either believing that one tale is superior to the other or that they are both possible interpretations of Anno's cleverly detailed illustrations.

The book may be a little confusing at first, but once the reader (and the children) get into it, it's a lot of fun. Mr. Fox is obviously clueless about a vast majority of the stories, and sometimes it takes some gentle nudging by his son to remember that he's supposed to be "reading" these tales. As for the tales themselves, Mr. Anno has meticulously researched and translated quite a few of them. An Editor's Note in the back of the text tells us that for some of the more obscure stories, Anno relied on books that were a little harder to find. These sources are cited for further reading by adults, if they so chose. Additionally, the book has some factual information about the man known as Aesop, including details on his life and even his death. As for the illustrations in the book itself, fans of Anno's other works will find only one picture that resembles books like "Anno's Journey". Unlike his other books, we see some fine details and facial expressions here. It is obvious that Mitsumasa Anno is a better artist that he'd ever like to let on. And we are the ones who benefit from his talents.

Altogether, the book is almost postmodern in its take on tales and the relation a reader has to illustrations in a text. Says Anno himself, "a child who cannot yet read words can still learn many valuable things by thinking creatively about what he or she sees in the pictures in this book, just as Freddy Fox does". Anyone interested in the fate of illustrations and how picture images are changed in the mind of the reader should take extra care to read this book sometime in their travels. Advanced enough to be pondered by adults, and amusing enough to be enjoyed by children, this book treads the fine line between what parents expect a book to provide and what kids want in their literature. A fabulous tale.
Landamath Landamath
Once again, Mistumasa Anno creates an awesome double story in Anno's Aesop. A boy, Freddy Fox, finds a book of Aesop's fables and begs his father to read them to him. The pages show both the pages of Aesop's fables and the words of the father as he "reads" it undearneath. The father creates stories to parallel the pictures. I always love the explanations in the back of Anno's books. Anno, from Japan, travels a lot but doesn't necessarily know the language. He supposes that if his son asked him to read something, he "might pretend" to read the book and so Mr. Fox is a look at Anno himself. I loved reading both the individual fables and ongoing story of Mr. Fox's interpretations. As always, Anno's illustrations are excellently done.
Ionzar Ionzar
If you are looking for an enjoyable version of Aesop's fables, look somewhere else. This author retells these classic tales in the shortest possible and hard-to-follow way. The parallel "side story", while an interesting idea, is executed in such an unreadable fashion that it's worthless. I am quite happy that I borrowed this book from the local library rather than purchasing it.

I have been using Amazon for 15 years and this is the first review I've ever left for a product, if that gives you any idea of how compelled I was to flag people away from this book. Reading the other reviews, my only guess is that these 5-star-giving individuals are fans of the author specifically, and the halo effect is causing them to look past the book's obvious shortcomings.
Kabandis Kabandis
ok