cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Crown of Dalemark (Dalemark Quartet)
eBook The Crown of Dalemark (Dalemark Quartet) ePub

eBook The Crown of Dalemark (Dalemark Quartet) ePub

by Diana Wynne Jones

  • ISBN: 0192750801
  • Subcategory: For Children
  • Author: Diana Wynne Jones
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 2nd edition (September 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1346 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1772 kb
  • Other: mobi mbr lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 194

Description

Dalemark is a region by the sea divided into South Dalemark and North Dalemark, consisting of 15 earldoms (formerly called marks): In addition to the 15 earldoms, Dalemark includes the so-called King's Lands (the Holy Islands, the Marshes, and the Shield of Oreth), although there has been no king in Dalemark for a long time.

The Crown of Dalemark is the concluding volume of the Dalemark Quartet Another thing I really enjoy about Diana Wynne Jones' books is that they are like giant puzzles, and they don't quite fit until the very end, and everything just locks into place.

The Crown of Dalemark is the concluding volume of the Dalemark Quartet. Oddly, this book didn't appear until 14 years after the last of the preceding three: in 1993. Yet it's not an afterthought - the series clearly needed a closing volume - I wonder why Ms. Jones waited so long. Another thing I really enjoy about Diana Wynne Jones' books is that they are like giant puzzles, and they don't quite fit until the very end, and everything just locks into place. In this respect you can liken them to the Harry Potter novels, so if you have read them but are unfamiliar with Diana Wynne Jones you may want to try this.

The Crown of Dalemark book. I read the Dalemark Quartet when I was in my early teens, and I ADORED them with every fiber of my sheltered, book-obsessed being. I re-read them three or four times in that year alone. But oh, how the mighty have fallen!

The Crown of Dalemark weighs heavy on Mitt. Fortunately, he has a friend with a solution. Spoilers for the end of Drowned Ammet and The Crown of Dalemark.

The Crown of Dalemark weighs heavy on Mitt.

When this final book of Diana Wynne Jones's quartet of novels about the mythical kingdom of Dalemark was .

When this final book of Diana Wynne Jones's quartet of novels about the mythical kingdom of Dalemark was published in 1995, it earned the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children's Literature. The Crown of Dalemark continues the adventures of Mitt after his flight from Holand as a fugitive accused of attempted murder. Since his arrival in the North of Dalemark, Mitt has become disillusioned. The North seems no more free than the South from which he came.

The Crown of Dalemark, 1993 (4). YouTube Encyclopedic.

When this final book of Diana Wynne Jones's quartet of novels about the mythical kingdom of Dalemark was published in 1995, it earned the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children's Literature

When this final book of Diana Wynne Jones's quartet of novels about the mythical kingdom of Dalemark was published in 1995, it earned the Mythopoeic Fantasy Award for Children's Literature.

The book weaves back and forth between two parallel times; Dalemark in present times, and the medieval times in which Mitt (of Drowned Ammet) and Moril ( of Cart and Cwidder) lived, some 200 years in the past. Moril is calmly leading his life in the North, while Mitt has managed to escape from the South. They meet in their own time in North Dalemark, and both of them get involved in the attempt to find the person who should be sitting on the empty throne of Dalemark.

The Crown of Dalemark is a 1993 fantasy novel by Diana Wynne Jones. It is the fourth and last book of the Dalemark Quartet, and follows the adventures of a group of people trying to reunite North and South Dalemark under a new king

The Crown of Dalemark is a 1993 fantasy novel by Diana Wynne Jones. It is the fourth and last book of the Dalemark Quartet, and follows the adventures of a group of people trying to reunite North and South Dalemark under a new king. The book is set in two parallel times; the present-day Dalemark, and the time of Mitt (Drowned Ammet) and Moril (Cart and Cwidder), some 200 years in the past.

Mitt has fled from the South, but finds that North Dalemark is just as full of spies and tyrants. And now he is trapped by an order to kill Noreth - a young girl who has proclaimed herself the heir to the crown of Dalemark. If he doesn't murder her, he risks the lives of his friends.

Comments

Painshade Painshade
I have had the first 3 books for nearly 10 years but never read them because I didn't have the 4th. I finally started reading... Took me less than a week!! I had to read this and my only disappointment is I need to know what happens with Mitt and Maewen. A final book with their ending would be the best thing after my marriage and children.
Laitchai Laitchai
You can't really predict what characters in Jones' fiction will turn out to be. This book is probably the best of her four part series, though they can each be read separately.
Vispel Vispel
~ Excellent author, really knows how to tell a story.
Justie Justie
_The Crown of Dalemark_ is the concluding volume of the Dalemark Quartet. Oddly, this book didn't appear until 14 years after the last of the preceding three: in 1993. Yet it's not an afterthought -- the series clearly needed a closing volume -- I wonder why Ms. Jones waited so long. At any rate it's a solid conclusion, much longer than the first three books, a bit darker in tone (though really all four books have dark overtones), and a logical and different than expected resolution to the situation set up in the first books.
There are two main characters in this book -- Mitt, also one of the heroes of book 2 (_Drowned Ammet_), and Maewen, and girl from the future of Dalemark -- a time very roughly corresponding to our own time in terms of technological development. Maewen, while visiting her father (her parents are separated), meets a couple of strange individuals. One, she soon learns, is Kankredin, the evil wizard from _The Spellcoats_, while the other is another of the Undying. This character maneuvers her back into the past, to take the place of Noreth, a girl from Mitt's time who looks just like Maewen. Noreth was a descendant of the rightful King of Dalemark, and she had planned to find the four objects that only the King can use (a cup, a ring, a sword, and a crown) and reclaim the Crown of Dalemark and reunite the sundered kingdom. But Noreth disappeared before she could accomplish this, and Maewen must walk the roads of Dalemark to find these objects in her place. The powers that be, naturally enough, oppose Noreth's quest, and she is stalked by assassins. One of these is Mitt, who is blackmailed by his Northern hosts into going after Noreth -- but after meeting her Mitt refuses, and soon he joins her tiny entourage, along with the hero of Book 1 (_Cart and Cwidder_): Moril the Singer, as well as another Singer, and the clever but perhaps not trustworthy southern nobleman who was also exiled to the North with Mitt, and the Undying who has sent Maewen here.
Maewen, Mitt, and the others wander about the countryside, often in rather magical fashion, tracking down the four objects, but also trying to elude the assassins, and eventually armies, which are trying to stop. Maewen's only goal is to give the objects to the man she knows became king: Amil the Great, the man who more or less singlehandedly founded modern Dalemark. But who could he be? There is no sign of him. The resolution is surprising and rather effective. Jones makes excellent use of the rather unusual magic "system" (though it's not really systematic, and is perhaps more effective for that) that she has established, especially the Undying, who are like gods but not by any means omnipotent or even all-knowing. The four books represent a very solid work of YA fantasy.
Gravelblade Gravelblade
I absolutely adore this book. The series itself is kind of weak, but this as a concluding volume brings back all the characters from the previous three and introduces Maewen, a girl from modern-day Dalemark who is jerked back in time to fill the place of Noreth. OKay. Dalemark is divided down the middle--North and South. Mitt and Navis are from the South, but now they are refugees in the North (they're from Drowned Ammet, and Mitt is in deep trouble: he has to kill someone. She's Noreth, a girl who firmly believes that she's the daughter of the One, one of the Undying, which are Dalemark's gods, and she also firmly believes that she is born to unite Dalemark and become their queen. And so Mitt(who is fifteen) and Navis (who is grown up) join her party. Only: Noreth disappears just before the start and Maewen takes her place. So Maewen (not really having any choice) fills in for her. They are joined by Moril and Hestefan the Singers (Moril's twelve or so and he's from Cart and Cwidder and his cwidder--that's a kind of lute--can do magic). On their ride to Kernsburgh, the ancient destroyed capital city, Maewen learns a lot about her country's history, meets some of the Undying (some people in Dalemark aren't gods--they just never die), and learns that she must get the Adon's gifts (the Adon was a legendary hero), and gets them. Noreth claimed she talked to the One, and Maewen hears a voice guiding her. There are also several attempts on her life, and she falls in love. But by the time they reach Kernsburgh, everyone knows who she truly is, and as they search for the lost crown of the great King Hern, they realize who the real king is. This is a brilliant and moving story and I recommend it to everyone (but read the other three first).