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eBook Wonder Woman: The Greatest Stories Ever Told ePub

eBook Wonder Woman: The Greatest Stories Ever Told ePub

by George Perez,H.G. Peter,Phil Jimenez,Charles Moulton

  • ISBN: 1401212166
  • Category: Graphic Novels
  • Subcategory: Funnies
  • Author: George Perez,H.G. Peter,Phil Jimenez,Charles Moulton
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: DC Comics; First Edition edition (April 18, 2007)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1624 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1674 kb
  • Other: azw mobi docx mobi
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 255

Description

The book begins with two stories from the original run by Creator William Moulton Marston in the 1940s. While the story showed Wonder Woman doing great things and interacting with Lois, who is jealous of her relationship with Superman, the story seemed forced.

The book begins with two stories from the original run by Creator William Moulton Marston in the 1940s. The origin story is skipped for the more entertaining "Wonder Woman Comes to America" which has a great light sense of fun to it as Wonder Woman encounters crooks and establishes her secret identity. The writers seemed self-conscious about making all the right points that they ended up with a lot of junk and lacked consistency.

Find nearly any book by Charles Moulton. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. Wonder Woman: The Greatest Stories Ever Told. by Charles Moulton, George Perez, . ISBN 9781401212162 (978-1-4012-1216-2) Softcover, DC Comics, 2007. Find signed collectible books: 'Wonder Woman: The Greatest Stories Ever Told'.

Written by. Phil Jimenez. Manufacturer: DC Comics Release date: 18 April 2007 ISBN-10 : 1401212166 ISBN-13: 9781401212162. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Please select Production or behind the scenes photos Concept artwork Cover CD/DVD/Media scans Screen capture/Screenshot. Please read image rules before posting.

Author Charles Moulton, George Perez, . Unknown - Please report.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Wonder Woman: The Greatest Stories Ever Told as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Reprints stories from WONDER WOMAN: SPIRIT OF TRUTH . Harry G. Peter artist. Robert Kanigher writer. William Moulton Marston writer.

Reprints stories from WONDER WOMAN: SPIRIT OF TRUTH, SENSATION COMICS WONDER WOMAN WONDER WOMAN WONDER WOMAN WONDER WOMAN WONDER WOMAN WONDER WOMAN WONDER WOMAN WONDER WOMAN (second series) and WONDER WOMAN (second series) Harry G.

The Greatest Story Ever Told is a 1965 American epic film produced and directed by George Stevens. Along with the ensemble cast, it marked. Along with the ensemble cast, it marked Claude Rains's final film role. They are summoned by King Herod the Great, whose advisers inform him of a Messiah mentioned in various prophecies.

The Wonder Woman presented here by William Moulton Marston is fun .

The Wonder Woman presented here by William Moulton Marston is fun and a bit flighty, but with a strong moral compass and a slightly hyperbolic desire to do good. I love the art by Harry G. Peter; it's slightly uglier and more blocky than what I'm used to, but his Diana is gorgeous and youthful. This story does a good job introducing a Wonder Woman who is confident but fish-out-of-water, but its last-minute inclusion of a romantic triangle between Wonder Woman, Steve Trevor, and Diana Prince is a bit hackneyed. As a single volume, Wonder Woman: The Greatest Stories Ever Told is hit or miss, with enough for devotees to appreciate but without much for new fans to latch onto.

The Greatest Wonder Woman Story Ever Told Wonder Woman had been around for decades, but it really took the George Perez and Greg Potter reboot after Crisis on Infinite Earths to make he. .

The Greatest Wonder Woman Story Ever Told. Wonder Woman had been around for decades, but it really took the George Perez and Greg Potter reboot after Crisis on Infinite Earths to make her get her place as one of the most respected books in the DC Universe.

Written by Charles Moulton and various Art by H.G. Peter and various Cover by Alex Ross The greatest adventures of the world's most renowned super-heroine are collected in one volume for the first time. From her beginnings in the early 1940s to today's ep

Comments

Weiehan Weiehan
Stories from Jan 42; Mar/Apr 48; Jul 58; Aug 59; Jul 66; Sep/Oct 68; Sep/Oct 74; Dec 81; Sep 88; and Jul, Nov 01. All comics in color.

This is more the different eras of Wonder Woman. It's nice that Lynda Carter did an introduction, but there could have been a second introduction by a comic historian. This book presumes some prior knowledge.
Rich Vulture Rich Vulture
When you see that the book opens with a prologue by Lynda Carter discussing the impact of Wonder Woman on her life and those she has encountered you know that the book is off to a good start. The book Wonder Woman: The Greatest Stories Ever Told takes pages from all the eras that Wonder Woman has been in. Don't pick this book up if you are looking for stories that are going to be in with today's character. They range from her creator Charles Moulton, through varies writers, to the 80's when the book was relaunched by George Perez until almost this current run. The stories show you how the character has changed to be current with each new generation that encounters her. Good reads and some terrific episodes from her varied history.
Giamah Giamah
It is hard to overview a character that is 65 years old. There were many stories that could have been included. For example, there is nothing from the "New Wonder Woman" period. This is ironic in that I Ching is being reintroduced as a result of the (latest) Crisis aftermath. I would have liked a story featuring Artemis as Wonder Woman. Someone reading this book may get the impression that Wonder Woman mooning / fretting over Steve Trevor was a common theme. It was, but the book was not as centered on that as just reading this book might lead you to believe. The final story is the best. It makes sense that Lois Lane would be uneasy about her husband's relationship with Diana. This story addresses that nicely. Oh, well....there is plenty of material for volume two.....
Drelahuginn Drelahuginn
I think there are better stories that could have been included, but overall interesting to see how the character has evolved over the years.
playboy playboy
Made a good birthday present For my girlfriend.
She loved it and this thing needs 6 more wOrds to post.
There
Swiang Swiang
This book is supposed to be made up of some of the Greatest story in the history of Wonder Woman from 1942-2001.

The book begins with two stories from the original run by Creator William Moulton Marston in the 1940s. The origin story is skipped for the more entertaining "Wonder Woman Comes to America" which has a great light sense of fun to it as Wonder Woman encounters crooks and establishes her secret identity. Second, we find Wonder Woman up against a team of supervillains when her attempt to put the Saturn women on Paradise Island's reformatory goes awry. The book length stories by Moulston were groundbreaking in that most comic book heroes would usually do 3 or 4 different stories when presented with their own magazine. Going back to Wonder Woman #2, Moulston would have a big plot for as comics as long as 64 pages. Whether this was Wonder Woman's greatest Golden Age story or not is unclear, but it's probably the one that could really fit in the 192-page book at a much more manageable 36 pages. It should be noted that the second story has more of Marston's legendary bondage imagery.

Next are three stories from the early to mid Silver Age by Robert Kanigher. "Top Secret" is a somewhat lame retelling of Wonder Woman's secret identity and a bizarre game played by Steve Trevor as the male Lois Lane trying to trick Wonder Woman into marrying him. "Wanted-Wonder Woman" is a fairly run of the mill alien story that just doesn't feel like it belongs in a greatest story ever told book. "Giganta-The Gorilla Girl" is from a series of stories where Wonder Woman's Golden age opponents were being reintroduced in the 1960s. Okay, but not great.

Next are three late Silver-to-Bronze book length adventures. "Wonder Woman's Rival" has Steve Trevor convicted of murder and acting like a jerk to blame Wonder Woman who tries to clear him by going undercover in mod clothing as she tries to solves the murder Steve's accused of. This was actually a pretty fun story.

Then we have "Wish Upon a Star," a story told by Green Lantern as he observes Wonder Woman as the JLA has its members observe Wonder Woman and evaluate whether to give her back membership in the JLA as part of the 12 Labors story in which Wonder Woman has to prove herself worthy of being in the JLA after leaving when she lost her powers. This is a part of Wonder Woman history that never made sense. It wasn't like she did anything unethical, so why did she have to prove that she was still worthy. So, while Wonder Woman has a great triumph, the underlying story makes no sense.

The best story in the book is without a doubt, "Be Wonder Woman...And Die" about a dying young woman who wants badly to play Wonder Woman in a film to prove herself as an actress and give some joy to her elderly father. While many stories here try to be emotionally powerful, this one does it and is the truest classic in the book.

Next up are two post-crisis Wonder Woman stories. First is, "Who Killed Windi Mayer" where most of the story is told by a male cop in this murder mystery that attempts a more realistic procedural. A police procedural is one of Wonder Woman’s greatest stories? Really?

Finally, we have "She's a Wonder" a story that's full of inconsistencies as Lois Lane follows Wonder Woman around for a day in the life with the help of the JLA teleporter. I really don't like the politics of Wonder Woman which really don't need to be stated. She comes out as pro-choice and attacks traditional religion. Whether you agree with the views expressed or not, it doesn't strike me as making the story timeless, but rather shoving politics down people's throats and dating it to the issues of the time.

The story's also bizarre for Wonder Woman's distracting constant wardrobe changes. Through the 18 hour day, she begins in Boston and then teleports to France wearing her traditional Wonder Woman costume and then speaks to College students then goes up to the Watch Tower to work on scientific experiments and changes into a Purple turtleneck and black mini-skirt, and does a TV interview in the same before teleporting to the White House wearing a dress that could double as a tent, before changing into a Wonder Woman costume with mini-skirt, then she goes into Atlanta and changes into a Wonder Woman t-shirt with gym shorts, then in a white t-shirt and workout pants in Indonesia, then back to Wonder Woman with mini-skirt in Rwanda, then to New York where she puts on a blue tunic with gray slacks at the UN, and then to white t-shirt and Jeans in support of an AIDS charity in Metropolis and finally back to her UN outfit on the streets. All told she wore seven different outfits and changed clothes nine times in a day. Mind you, she is at know time carrying a bag with extra clothes.

In addition, the artists and writers couldn't seem to agree. A full page spread of Wonder Woman declares she wears no make up while she's obviously wearing pink nail polish and lipstick.

While the story showed Wonder Woman doing great things and interacting with Lois, who is jealous of her relationship with Superman, the story seemed forced. The writers seemed self-conscious about making all the right points that they ended up with a lot of junk and lacked consistency.

Until this last story, the book was bordering on being four stars, but this makes a definite three.

The other thing that keeps this story out of the four star territory is the introduction. It's by Linda Carter who played TV's Wonder Woman and seems to know nothing about the comic. This is a book that needs an introduction. If I hadn't researched beforehand, I wouldn't have know about the "12 labors " series or how rare the lengthy villain battle contained here during the Golden Age was. Wonder Woman went through more fundamental changes than other characters which leaves many questions. Why did they redo Wonder Woman's origin in 1958? Why were they reintroducing Golden Age characters in 1966? You won't find the answers here.

There was a time that DC would put good introductions that would give fans the context to understand what's going on when they did DC Archives and the original Greatest story ever told collections in the late 1980s and DC Archives books. What Wonder Woman got here was a mish mash of stories with no context, some of them excellent, and some unintentionally laughable. She deserves better than this thrown together book by DC.
Quynaus Quynaus
The DC Comics "Greatest Stories" series is misnomered but nonetheless in most instances at least a decent intro to the history of each of the characters dealt with. The Wonder Woman entry is a good as any though given the less-than-200-page format it will not be completely satisfactory to anyone who knows much about Wonder Woman. There are stories that dip into most of the principal periods of her history. One definitely gets a sense of how her character has been changed and altered from one decade to another to correspond to larger societal changes in the roles of women. For instance, the stories that come from the fifties show a decidedly contracted role of women in society.

The stories were apparently chosen to give newcomers a taste of most of the highpoints of Wonder Woman's history. I emphasize "taste" because if you don't know, for instance, who Etta Candy and the Holiday Girls are, the selections won't explain it to you. Ditto several of Wonder Woman's major nemeses. We aren't introduced to them so much as they are gestured at.

All in all, while I would not recommend against anyone taking a peek at this, I would recommend Les Daniels's WONDER WOMAN: A COMPLETE HISTORY as a better introduction to Wonder Woman. Daniels gives a rich and near-exhaustive treatment of Wonder Woman in all periods of her stories and provides a detailed discuss of the various people engaged in the composition of the stories. I think WONDER WOMAN: THE GREATEST STORIES EVER TOLD could be very profitably read in conjunction with reading Daniels's book. The same would be true of the Superman and Batman volumes in this series, two characters for which Daniels has also written "complete histories." This would rectify the greatest shortcoming of the "Greatest Stories" series, the lack of any larger context for the individual stories.