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eBook Superman: Birthright ePub

eBook Superman: Birthright ePub

by Leinil Francis Yu,Leinil Francis Yu^Gerry Alanguilan,Dave McCaig,Mark Waid

  • ISBN: 1401202527
  • Category: Graphic Novels
  • Subcategory: Funnies
  • Author: Leinil Francis Yu,Leinil Francis Yu^Gerry Alanguilan,Dave McCaig,Mark Waid
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: DC Comics (October 1, 2005)
  • Pages: 314
  • ePub book: 1431 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1867 kb
  • Other: txt lrf lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 973

Description

The art by Leinil Francis Yu is the strength of this book. Yu's style really works for Superman, especially his wide, open shots that are frequently used to define this interpretation of Superman

The art by Leinil Francis Yu is the strength of this book. His Superman cuts a big, imposing, almost menacing figure. His Luthor is maniacal, evil, and rat like. Yu's style really works for Superman, especially his wide, open shots that are frequently used to define this interpretation of Superman. At times, his facial expressions appear a little too angular to work, but this is infrequent. It's an interesting dichotomy, as certain aspects appear very realistic, while other panels are pure comic-book abstracts. Yu is something unique, and I'm glad this title had his talent. Overall, this is an easy recommendation.

Leinil Francis Yu (born July 31, 1977) is a Filipino comic book artist, who began working for the American market through Wildstorm Productions. In an interview published in Marvel's Daily Bugle newsletter, he described his style as "Dynamic Pseudo-Realism. Leinil Francis Yu was first recognized after winning the Wizard's Drawing Board Contest, his first published work.

After a long sabbatical from mainstream comics, Alanguilan, partnered again with Leinil Yu in 2012 on the art for Mark Millar's Supercrooks. Main article: Elmer (comics).

1968-01-20)January 20, 1968 San Pablo City, Laguna, Philippines. Gerry Alanguilan was born in the city of San Pablo, Laguna in the Philippines. According to family lore, their surname was originally San Gabriel and they trace their origins to the barrio/barangay of Sta. Catalina, now part of San Pablo City and known as "Sandig" before the Spanish conquest. After a long sabbatical from mainstream comics, Alanguilan, partnered again with Leinil Yu in 2012 on the art for Mark Millar's Supercrooks.

Superman: Birthright. by Mark Waid · Leinil Francis Yu. 2013·. by Mark Millar · Leinil Francis Yu · Gerry Alanguilan · Jason Paz · Edgar Tadeo · Jeff Huet · Laura Martin · Dave McCaig · Frank Martin.

by Mark Waid · Alfred Gough · Miles Millar · Dave McCaig · Gerry Alanguilan · Leinil Francis Y.

by Mark Waid · Alfred Gough · Miles Millar · Dave McCaig · Gerry Alanguilan · Leinil Francis Yu. 2005·. The entire modern day retelling of Superman - from his early days in Smallville with Lana Lang and Lex Luthor, to his first meeting with Lois Lane, Jimmy Olsen and Perry White in Metropolis - is recounted in this lavish hardcover collection by writer.

Writing and art by by Mark Waid, Leinil Francis Yu, Gerry Alanguilan, and Dave McCaig. Marvel avengers titan hero series!

Writing and art by by Mark Waid, Leinil Francis Yu, Gerry Alanguilan, and Dave McCaig. Marvel avengers titan hero series!

In Birthright, Mark Waid recognizes the truth about Superman's near omnipotence, and he expresses it through the two most important human men in Superman's life: Pa Kent and Lex Luthor.

In Birthright, Mark Waid recognizes the truth about Superman's near omnipotence, and he expresses it through the two most important human men in Superman's life: Pa Kent and Lex Luthor. The former tries to warn Superman of humanity's fears and convince his son to stay hidden and avoid conflict. The latter embodies humanity's paranoia, only ramped up to the levels that only a mad ultra-genius could attain, putting Luthor in a position to make a power grab using the best possible tool - Superman himself.

Superman: Birthright by Mark Waid, Leinil Francis Yu, Gerry Alanguilan and Dave McCaig. This publication takes you back to the beginning of Superman's origin story - back when he was a simple farm boy/alien in Kansas. 22. Batwoman: Elegy by Greg Rucka and . 23. The Watchmen by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons

Discuss Superman: Birthright Vol 1 1 on the forums. Cover gallery for the Superman: Birthright series.

Leinil Francis Yu. Inkers. Discuss Superman: Birthright Vol 1 1 on the forums. Images from Superman: Birthright Vol 1 1. Recommended Reading. Superman Recommended Reading.

Город: Manila, PhilippinesПодписчиков: 31 ты. себе: Sole employee of Leinil Yu International. себе: Sole employee of Leinil Yu International Studios.

The whole world knows that Superman fights for truth and justice...but why does he?  What drives a farmboy from Kansas to divide his life between posing as a mild-mannered reporter and embarking on a career as a super-hero?Superman: Birthright tells the exciting origin of The Man of Steel, incorporating his vast and colorful legend into a brand-new epic tale...a battle to save both the legacy of Krypton and the future of Metropolis!This volume collects Superman: Birthright #1-12.

Comments

Painshade Painshade
Though I've long since been a fan of the action/adventure/superhero genre, I was never the heaviest of comic book readers--mainly because with storylines carrying on for over 70 years, it was near impossible to know where to start. But thanks to "ComicPOP"--a YouTube channel that analyzes (and jokes about) various famous storylines from comic history, I've slowly been venturing into the books more. One trade paperback in particular that got their high recommendation was this one, and though I like Superman as much as the next person, he was never one of my favorite superheroes (in comparison to others). I always found him (again, in comparison to others) kind of bland (or worse, boring). But ComicPOP hasn't steered me wrong so far, so I gave this book a shot.

I'm so glad I did, for this is one of the best depictions of Superman that I've ever come across, and it's made me realize that the Man of Steel is NOT boring, when written right.

This whopping, 12-part story seeks to retell the origin of Superman; keeping his basic roots the same, but updating other details for the modern day. After a tear-jerking opening in which Jor-El rockets his only son to Earth from the doomed planet Krypton, we immediately cut to an already grown up Clark Kent as he uses his freelance reporting job to travel around the globe--learning all he can while also trying to figure out who he is and his place in the world. After being inspired by a village in Africa and subsequently saving its people from a corrupt politician, Clark decides to take up the image of his Kryptonian ancestors and use his powers to help people. With some help from Ma and Pa Kent, he forges both his costume and his "mild mannered" alter ego, and lands a reporting job at the Daily Planet in Metropolis. There, he makes his debut as Superman, and instantly runs afoul of business tycoon, Lex Luthor, who has a more personal connection to Clark than anyone realizes. When Luthor makes it his mission to discredit Superman and turn the world against him, Clark must find a way to save his reputation and the legacy of the planet he left behind...and become the hero the world needs.

I can count on my hands the number of times my jaw has physically dropped while reading something, and I can add this trade paperback to that list. This book can serve as the perfect introduction to new comic readers, and the story and its characters are so strong that it dearly makes me wish that THIS were the plot to the "Man of Steel" movie instead. Everything about this version of the origin and how it plays out is perfect from beginning to end. It stays true to Superman's roots, while giving him a modern spin that makes sense. It's not as whimsical as the Richard Donner/Christopher Reeve movie, but also doesn't get too grim and gritty, and still has plenty of humorous moments, and a heart that drives the story. We're along for the ride with Clark as he tries to discover who he is and why he's here, and in doing so, he learns to embrace his alien heritage while following the morals the Kents (and the Earth) taught him. It's Clark who decides who he is, rather than letting it be decided for him, and his friends and family help him along the way, either directly or indirectly. Everything has a logical explanation, from how his costume is made, to why he refuses to wear a mask, to how he puts together his "mild mannered reporter" persona, to why his friends (and foes) act the way they do.

The supporting cast is just as interesting. The Kents are still alive and play an active role in his life (with the added bonus that Martha's now a UFO chaser--it's funny, but makes sense, considering where her son comes from). Lois is still a brave, hard-nosed reporter, who almost never needs saving, but from the moment we meet her, we know that underneath her steel and grit is a heart just as compassionate as Clark's, who wants to do the right thing.

As for Lex, he's a multi-dimensional villain that's surprisingly sympathetic at times (at least in the beginning). He winds up being a perfect balance between the criminal businessman and the mad scientist he used to be portrayed as years ago. Here, he's an astrobiologist who was once friends with Clark back when they were in high school. Growing up as a super genius left him outcasted and isolated from everyone else, and in his feverish pursuit to contact aliens, he's not only driven into megalomania, but winds up, (ironically), being the one to help Clark discover where he came from....and in a weird way, leave his birth parents a parting message in an ending that nearly left me in tears.

All n' all, this is, hands down, the best version of Superman's origin I've ever heard. They manage to take a grand, epic tale, and humanize it and make Clark relatable. He gets angry, he gets scared, he stumbles and makes mistakes, and has to find his place in a world that fears anything different. But he powers on through and learns to embrace what makes him special. A MUST read, for both fans of Superman, and comics, period.
Zuser Zuser
Superman is one of the most scrutinized comic book heroes, as everyone has their own ideal image of what the Man of Steel ought to be. As a result, when even the most minute detail of Superman is changed or reworked, whatever issue or collection this was done in is labeled with negativity. Sometimes it is small, other times, not so much. For the life of me, I cannot see how Birthright could, in any way, offend a Superman fan, long-time or new (unless having Clark becoming a vegetarian is sacrilege to you).

The writing is outstanding. Mark Waid, author of my favorite comic Kingdom Come, has a firm grasp on the character of Superman. Additionally, he can portray the whole cast of Superman characters, from Lois to Lex, with wit, energy, and engaging dialogue. The story is very linear, despite it literally crossing continents. The chapters are not broken up by issue covers, which is a double-edged sword. On one hand, the story flows without stopping. On the other hand, I find these natural breaks allow for material to be digested. This is minor, and doesn't reflect the quality of writing, but I felt is important enough to make note of.

The plot is extraordinary, and respects the history of Superman while also creating something new for the reader to enjoy. There is humor, tragedy, and adventure in Birthright, exposing the reader to several flavors of Superman stories. The origin of Lex Luthor is especially enjoyable, as it both humanizes and demonizes the megalomaniac. This is an origin story, but it's refreshing and deep. Superman's origin was given for years as just one page containing all the essentials. It takes skill to expand on this and make it interesting. Waid does this with ease.

The art is great, though it took some getting used to. It's not really comparable to any other art I am familiar with in terms of style. Yu uses very angular shapes and figures, but rest assured, they are not abstract Picasso renderings. The cover chosen for this collection does not reflect the best art from Yu, so if it made you hesitate, don't worry. Yu's style really works for Superman, especially his wide, open shots that are frequently used to define this interpretation of Superman. At times, his facial expressions appear a little too angular to work, but this is infrequent. It's an interesting dichotomy, as certain aspects appear very realistic, while other panels are pure comic-book abstracts. Yu is something unique, and I'm glad this title had his talent.

Overall, this is an easy recommendation. It's not the most thought-provoking work on Superman, but it is one of his greatest appearances. Don't confuse my previous remarks as saying Birthright is vanilla, because it's not. This is a clean, classic Superman that is placed in brutal real-world environments with both fantastic and all-too real villains. If you are just getting into reading Superman, I can think of no better place than Birthright to start with. It's undeniably great, and captures the true essence of Superman.
saafari saafari
After more than 60 years, DC Comics decided it was time to revisit the origins of Superman. For this, they turned to the Golden Ages biggest fans, Mark Waid. And Waid did not disappoint.

Birthright is not the story of Clark Kent as a teenager, as you might expect from reading the description. The story starts our when Kal-El is 25, breaking into the reporting game and desperately searching for a purpose in life. From their, Waid reconstructs all the major elements of the superman mythos, from his parents, his disguise as Clark Kent, and his relationship to his main antagonist, Lex Luthor.

Other than Kurt Busiek, Mark Waid may be the best comics writer alive when it comes to stories like this; hopeful, and light-hearted with just enough edge to keep them from being cheesy. This volume has tons of great jokes and jaw-dropping moments to make it worthy of being one of Superman's all time great stories.
Leyl Leyl
I'm a fairly new Superman fan -- i got into the character last fall thanks to a roommate who really loved Smallville. When BVS came out, I was hooked even further.

This comic is perfect for people who love the Welling and Cavill takes on Superman, as well as the people who appreciate really early Golden Age Superman. Clark has a phenomenal social conscience, and his work as a reporter is just as important as his work as Superman.

Additionally, if you were confused by the way Lex Luthor was portrayed in BVS, you can clearly see the comics basis of that version of the character here. Desperate, hurt, and interminably lonely, the teenager Clark knew in Smallville in this story could quite easily have grown into the man who tried to kill him in BVS.

Overall, I love Birthright, and I really need to read some of Waid's other Superman work!