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eBook Amazing Fantasy (Adult) Omnibus HC Brereton Variant ePub

eBook Amazing Fantasy (Adult) Omnibus HC Brereton Variant ePub

by Steve Ditko,Jack Kirby,Don Heck,Paul Reinman,Stan Lee

  • ISBN: 0785128956
  • Category: Graphic Novels
  • Subcategory: Funnies
  • Author: Steve Ditko,Jack Kirby,Don Heck,Paul Reinman,Stan Lee
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Marvel Comics (September 5, 2007)
  • Pages: 416
  • ePub book: 1679 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1572 kb
  • Other: lit doc mobi azw
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 946

Description

Amazing fantasy omnibus HC. Written by STAN LE.

Amazing fantasy omnibus HC. Written by STAN LEE. Penciled by STEVE DITKO, JACK KIRBY, DON HECK & PAUL REINMAN. Cover by STEVE DITKO. And then Stan Lee and Steve Ditko did just that by launching "The Magazine That Respects Your Intelligence!" An all-new approach for the young comics sophisticate, Amazing Adult Fantasy presented Twilight Zone-tinged tales of otherworldly aliens, time travel, ghosts, atomic nightmares, and maybe even the secret of the universe itself. With story after lushly-illustrated story, Ditko set a new standard for comic book illustration, and Lee raised the bar ever higher with his scintillating scripts.

Amazing Fantasy Omnibus book . Meet the Man who Captured Death, the Man in the Mummy Case. You can't beat Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko art and Stan Lee writing for classic 1960s over-the-top monster stories. Great reads Recommended. Marvelous Steve Ditko and Jack Kirby art makes this a real treat for the eyes, the stories are pretty much what you would expect from this period, but if your an old codger like me you might just remember them from the first time round ! Classic stuff, well worth a look.

Stephen J. Ditko (/ˈdɪtkoʊ/; November 2, 1927 – c. June 29, 2018) was an American comics artist and writer best known as the artist and co-creator, with Stan Lee, of the Marvel Comics superheroes Spider-Man and Doctor Strange

Stephen J. June 29, 2018) was an American comics artist and writer best known as the artist and co-creator, with Stan Lee, of the Marvel Comics superheroes Spider-Man and Doctor Strange. Ditko studied under Batman artist Jerry Robinson at the Cartoonist and Illustrators School in New York City.

This story is a reprint of the comicAmazing Adventures Featured Characters: Paul Ramsay (Only appearance). Supporting Characters: John Carter (Only appearance). Antagonists: Torr (Only appearance; dies). Locations: United States of America

This story is a reprint of the comicAmazing Adventures Featured Characters: Paul Ramsay (Only appearance). Locations: United States of America. Mountain Observatory. This story is a reprint of the comicAmazing Adventures Two astronomers watch with apprehension the approach of a space ship

Amazing Fantasy Omnibus vo. beautifully reprints in their entirety: Amazing Adventures Amazing Adult Fantasy and Amazing Fantasy - the title that introduced the amazing Spiderman to the world.

Amazing Fantasy Omnibus vo. ISBN13:9780785124580. Release Date:September 2007.

1961–62): Steve Ditko, Jack Kirby, Don Heck, Paul Reinman, et al. (1995): Paul Lee (2004): Various. 1961–62): Dick Ayers, et al. Amazing Adult Fantasy and its retitled final issue, Amazing Fantasy, is an American comic book anthology series published by Marvel Comics from 1961 through 1962, with the latter title revived with superhero features in 1995 and in the 2000s. The final 1960s issue, Amazing Fantasy (cover-dated Aug. 1962), is the title that introduced the popular superhero character Spider-Man

Find steve ditko omnibus from a vast selection of Books.

Find steve ditko omnibus from a vast selection of Books. Customs services and international tracking provided.

Cover by JACK KIRBY and STEVE DITKO

Cover by JACK KIRBY and STEVE DITKO. In 1962, in the pages of a comic book slated for cancellation, Stan Lee and Steve Ditko gave birth to one of the most-enduring icons in American popular media: the one and only Amazing Spider-Man! Turning the concept of a super hero on its head, they imbued the young, guilt-ridden Peter Parker with the fantastic powers of an arachnid and the fantastic pressures of an everyday teenager.

Across six issues of truly amazing adventures, Lee, Kirby, and Ditko dreamed up a cadre of ten-story tall menaces from Torr to Manoo to the one and only Monsteroso to trash unwitting Earthlings on a month-in and month-out basis. Backed up by weird tales of wax museums, witchcraft, Martians, and the occult master who set the trenchcoat trend in comics, Dr. Druid, it seemed these titanic tales could never be topped. And then Stan Lee and Steve Ditko did just that by launching "The Magazine That Respects Your Intelligence!" An all-new approach for the young comics sophisticate, Amazing Adult Fantasy presented Twilight Zone-tinged tales of otherworldly aliens, time travel, ghosts, atomic nightmares, and maybe even the secret of the universe itself. With story after lushly-illustrated story, Ditko set a new standard for comic book illustration, and Lee raised the bar even higher with his scintillating scripts. And, oh, in the last issue they created some guy named "Spider-Man." Collecting Amazing Adventures #1-6, Amazing Adult Fantasy #7-14 and Amazing Fantasy #15 between two hardcovers 45 years in the making.

Comments

Zulkigis Zulkigis
These are nice stories. Sure, they're horror, sci-fi and fantasy, but it's about as horrific as watching old Frankenstein, Dracula or King Kong movies. Stan Lee typically worked in a little moral lesson or statement into these stories -- to bravely explore the unknown, to be compassionate to the unfortunate, to venerate the power of the imagination --!

These are good stories to read to kids, or even to enjoy yourself, if you haven't become too cynical. And yes, historically, you can see the influence of the pop culture of the day, and many of the elements which would, in later years, become the building blocks of the early Marvel Univere.
BroWelm BroWelm
High quality book with fantastic (if cliched) short sci-fi stories. This is the art that made Steve Ditko and Jack Kirby into the icons they are still known for. Highly recommended! To say more would make me look like a fan boy - so just rush out and buy a copy! You'll be glad you did!
Levaq Levaq
This is the mass market edition with the homage cover by Brereton of the Kirby original.

Collects the entire Amazing Adventures/Amazing Adult Fantasy/Amazing Fantasy run 1-15 (June 1961 - August 1962), including the first appearance of Spider-man, in oversized omnibus format. Extras include Introduction by Stephen Bissette, Essay by Jack Kirby on "Jack Kirby, Atlas Comics and Monsters" written in 1994 from Monster Menace #2, essay on Amazing Fantasy by Ditko historian Blake Bell, original art from #5 page 1 "The Escape of Monsteroso" by Jack Kirby and Dick Ayers, original art from #6, page 8 and 10 by Jack Kirby and Dick Ayers, the Monsters on the Prowl #27 abd 28 covers for Sserpo and Monsteroso (recolored in 1973), Strange Tales #175 (Torr), Weird Wonder Tales 19-22 featuring Dr Druid (known as Dr Droom in Amazing Adventures), house ad from Hulk #1 for Amazing Adult Fantasy and Fantastic Four, Amazing Adult Fantasy covers redone as covers for Fantasy Masterpieces #1 (pieced together, featuring Those Who Change by Ditko) and Journey into Mystery #10 (Tim Boo Baa), Steve Ditko cover for Monster Menace #2 including a creature key for each of the 22 on the cover, Ditko cover for Monster Menace #3, Curse of the Weird #1, Ditko pinup from Monster Menace #1 & #3 and one page.

Amazing Adventure was the fifth sci-fi/fantasy/monster title that the former Atlas, pre-Marvel company produced right at the cusp of the Marvel Age five months before the Fantastic Four debuted (technically they had World of Fantasy and Strange Worlds, but they were cancelled in August 1959). Issues 1-6 are formatted similarly to Tales to Astonish, Tales of Suspense, Journey into Mystery and Strange Tales. Kirby, inked by Ayers, did the featured lead. Ditko did the closing story. Other artists would fill out the 4-6 page stories with two more tales.

I love all the monster books from Atlas/Marvel. Great art (sometimes better than when the Marvel age first dawned, with changes in inkers and possibly the increased pace for monthly titles, resulting in art in early Marvel that wasn't as good as the art in their creature features for the five years prior.

If the stories are binge read, the Lee/Ditko later tales can become a bit repetitive at times. Taken in small doses, these can be amazing.

Highlights (Lee is credited as writer for all 15 issues. He may have ony written a few of the Ditko stories):

#1 - "Midnight in the Wax Museum" by Ditko, "The Origin of Dr. Droom" by Kirby and Ayers. Dr Droom's origin would share a few story elements with Dr Strange when the Master of the Mystic Arts debuted a few years later. I really enjoyed this origin, even if there were somewhat racist aspects with the doctor's face changing. If Dr. Droom had remained on the title until the end, we might be considering him the first Marvel super-hero.

#2 - Dr. Droom returns "From the Amazing Cases of Dr. Droom, The World Below" by Kirby and Ayers, and "Rocky's Last Ride" by Ditko. Dr. Droom must investigate the disappearance of the world's largest ship. Mechanic Rocky gets more than he bargained for when he takes a customer's car for a spin.

#3 - "I Was Trapped in the Prehistoric World!" two-parter by Kirby and Ayers. This story has beautiful mishmash of prehistoric eras. Doctor Droom meets Zemu, a magician who can levitate a whole audience with his powerful spells.

#4 - "I am Robot X" two-parter by Kirby and Ayers. A scientist builts an advanced robot but the world wants to destroy it out of fear for the artificial intelligence. "Who was the Bootblack?" by Ditko. Ruthless businessman Simon Sledge tries to grind a bootblack beneath his heel, but the old man bewitches Sledge. Now his problems are just beginning. Another tale of mystery with Dr. Droom in "What Lurks Within?" by Kirby and Ayers.

#5 - "The Escape of... Monsteroso" two-parter by Kirby and Ayers. "The Watchers" by Don Heck. "The Joker" by Ditko deals with a practical joker that takes his jokes too far.

#6 - "Sserpo! The Creature Who Crushed the Earth!" two-parter by Kirby and Ayers. Is there anything cooler than monstrous Sserpo rising out of the ocean for the Part 2 splash. "The Fourth Man!" by Ditko is a warm tale about a man who is mugged in the middle of a park on a sunny day. His protector emerges from an unlikely source. Paul Reinman does the final Dr. Droom piece "Dr. Droom Defies the Menace called... Krogg!"

#7 - With this issue the format and title change. All stories are done by Lee and Ditko. The series starts off with a bang in "Why Won't They Believe Me?" A man comes across a crashed spaceship and tries to report it to the authorities. No one believes him about the imminent danger. "The Last Man on Earth" features a miserly man who could pass for J Jonah Jamison's cousin. He locks himself away from the rest of the world. "Journey's End" has a thief use a time traveling device to escape capture. "The Icy Fingers of Fear" has an alien come to Earth but we don't understand his language. Is he threatening us?

#8 - "The Coming of the Krills" repeats an oft-told Atlas era tale of a snivelling coward cooperating with a conquering alien race for the promise of reward. This is one of the better done versions of this tale. "A Monster Among Us" is also derivative of other stories in the same model. An alien comes to Earth. Is he friend or foe? Beautiful art by Ditko separate it from its predesessors in the same vein.

#9 - "The Man Who Captured Death" is an awesome Ditko/Lee tale about an old man and his struggle with Death.

#10 - "Man on a Tightrope" is a terrific tale of the bond between the Great Filippo and a sick child who adores him. Filippo has an accident but will he still be able to do the highwire stunt for the hopeful little girl?

#11 - "For the Rest of Your Life" is mined from the Atlas catalog, but Lee and Ditko produce a superior version of the tale. "Where Walks the Ghost?" is a haunting tale.

#12 - "Melvin the Martian" is an excellent tale of expectations. "Something Fantastig?" is an acclaimed story that stars Lee and Kirby in silhouette struggling to come up with a new story before the looming deadline and a strange little man that wants them to publish his amazingly fantastic story. "The Plague" is a Cold War propaganda piece with a neat twist. "The Living Statues" is a fascinating look at an astronaut returning to a stranger Earth than what he left. What is the mystery behind the living statues?

#13 - "The Great Zeus" has them dabble in mythology two months before the debut of Thor in Journey into Mystery. "The Ultimate Weapon" hangs above our world like the dangling Sword of Damocles. What do they want? "The Stroke of Midnight" finds undersea creatures rising from the docks in New York City.

#14 - Tad Carter could've been another early Marvel hero, and a mutant at that. "The Man in the Sky" echoes some of the themes Lee and Kirby will explore in the pages of the X-men. "Footsteps at Midnight" features the strangest alien invasion of all time. "Ozarr the Mighty" is a tale of magic genie and the greatest wish of a brow-beaten man.

#15 - One of the most famous comics of all time, the two-part debut of Spider-man. "There are Martians Among Us" but how do we find them.

There are several more stories but I felt these were the best.

This book continues to shoot up in price as copies become more rare. Right now, new copies are being sold for $150 for this edition and $170 for the Kirby original cover on the Direct Market edition. Used copies are quite a bit less.

This is a fantasic book with amazing reproduction qualities and published with high quality. Recommended!
Ustamya Ustamya
Stan Lee the man of thousand ideas. Before Stan Lee committed himself to super heroes the variety of his ideas spread from horizon to horizon. This book is evidence for that. Everything was possible. You get crime, monsters, SF, horror, history, mystery, and ... more than you can imagine. Each of these 68 short stories are well worth reading and some of them are classics. For example a story which contains the whole idea of "The Sixth Sense". The genius of Jack Kirby is already there and the innovative drawings from Steve Ditko are eye-popping. The book is oversized and the printing quality is perfect. This outstanding stories printed in this beautiful edition is a gem in any comic book collection. Highly recommend to all comic book fans.