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eBook The Rise of Apocalypse (X-Men) ePub

eBook The Rise of Apocalypse (X-Men) ePub

by James Felder,Adam Pollina,Mark Morales,Terry Kavanagh

  • ISBN: 0785105867
  • Category: Graphic Novels
  • Subcategory: Funnies
  • Author: James Felder,Adam Pollina,Mark Morales,Terry Kavanagh
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Marvel Enterprises (March 1, 1998)
  • Pages: 160
  • ePub book: 1550 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1106 kb
  • Other: mbr lit rtf mbr
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 914

Description

Whether you're a longtime fan of the X-Men comics or just someone who has only ever seen the films, this is the pefect book for you if you want to learn more about one of the X-Men's most dangerous foes.

Only 11 left in stock (more on the way). Whether you're a longtime fan of the X-Men comics or just someone who has only ever seen the films, this is the pefect book for you if you want to learn more about one of the X-Men's most dangerous foes. This volume is actually composed of multiple different stories featuring the titular character. The first is the Rise of Apocalypse mini-series, originally released in the 90s, it gives you the character's origin in Ancient Egypt.

The Rise of Apocalypse is a four-issue limited series published in 1996 by Marvel Comics. The series was written by Terry Kavanagh, and drawn by Adam Pollina. 5,000 years ago, a baby is found in the Egyptian desert by a band of nomad raiders. The child is raised and named En Sabah Nur by the tribe's leader, Baal, who teaches the boy survival of the fittest

Kavanagh's last new comics project was the Before the Fantastic Four: The Storms limited series in 2000–2001. Other books in the series.

This tells the story of the X-Men's greatest villain Apocalypse, or En Sabah. Kavanagh & Pollina put together a decent story here that tells the untold origin of Apocalpyse, one of the X-Universe's greatest villains. I loved the ties to ancient Egypt and even Rama-Tut but the ties to the Marvel Universe were to loose. They were mentioned and even shown but too quickly glossed over. Kavanagh's last new comics project was the Before the Fantastic Four: The Storms limited series in 2000–2001. The Rise of Apocalypse (4 books). Books by Terry Kavanagh.

Rise of Apocalypse (1996) Tags: X-Men. Published Oct 1996 by Marvel. Blood of the Father, script by Terry Kavanagh and James Felder, art by Adam Pollina and Mark Morales; En Sabah Nur and Baal get trapped in a cave-in; Baal tends to Nurs wounds, and they try to find their way out; Baal tells the origin of Rama-Tut; villains in the story include Rama Tut, Ozymandias, and Logos.

Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for X-Men: The Rise of Apocalypse by James Felder .

Follow the journey of an outcast baby from ancient Egypt as he rises to become humanity's greatest enemy! Rescued and raised to believe in the survival of the fittest, the child known as En Sabah Nur is targeted by the pharaoh's scheming vizier Ozymandias and the time-traveling Rama-Tut! Millennia later, joincyclops and Phoenix in the 19th Century, caught between Apocalypse and Mr. Sinister!

Terry Kavanagh, James Felder. Place of Publication. Graphic Novels: Superheroes.

Terry Kavanagh, James Felder. 1 Illustrations, Unspecified. Reading Age. From 13 Years. Adam Pollina, Anthony Williams. Injustice: Gods Among Us Year Five Total views: 1963614 Last issue: 4. Teen Titans Vol 3 Total views: 1743059 Last issue: 10. Justice League Vol 2 Total views: 1633548 Last issue: 52. Several thousand years ago, a baby is found in the Egyptian desert by Baal and the Sandstormers. Batman Vol 2 Total views: 1464244 Last issue: 52. Injustice: Gods Among Us Total views: 1444254 Last issue: 36. Injustice: Gods Among Us Year Four Total views: 1273230 Last issue: 2.

Terry Kavanagh James Felder. Mark Morales Harry Candelario. Richard Starkings Comicraft. plot summary at uncannyxmen.

Collecting RISE OF APOCALYPSE FURTHER ADVENTURES OF CYCLOPS & PHOENIX X-MEN: APOCALYPSE/DRACULA BLACK KNIGHT: EXODUS and FANTASTIC FOUR (1961) #19.

Collecting RISE OF APOCALYPSE FURTHER ADVENTURES OF CYCLOPS & PHOENIX X-MEN: APOCALYPSE/DRACULA BLACK KNIGHT: EXODUS and FANTASTIC FOUR (1961) Digital Issue Read online or on your iPhone, iPad or Android Device.

This tells the story of the X-Men's greatest villain Apocalypse, or En Sabah Nur as he was known in ancient Egypt. Witness his rise to power and the challenges he faced in his attempts to fulfill his dream of world domination.

Comments

Windworker Windworker
For some reason, the movie "The Scorpion King" made me think of this book. Maybe it's because both of them contain muscle-bound, anti-heroes overthrowing an oppresive Egyptian Monarchy. There are even some scenes where The Rock, with his top-knot ponytail and overly buff physique sort of resembles Apocalypse without the blue facepaint.
Personally, I liked the artwork in "The Rise of Apocalypse". The lush character design and splash-page layouts tend to grab your attention.
Unfortunately, the story detracts from the experience as much as the artwork enhances it. As the other reviewer said, it's pretty poorly written. Apocalypse, who is (was) supposed to be one of the Marvel Universe's most powerful villians doesn't even get a decent backstory in his own origin. Terry Cavanaugh does a horrible job illustrating Apocalypse's mutant ability and an even worse job explaining the spark that sets off his millenia-old war on humanity.
Still...it's fun to look at. I'd give it 2.5 stars for the artwork alone.
Narim Narim
Awsome finaly the orgin of the Apocalypse. Egypt is were this story begins and ends in this first cameo and full figure storys. Only the Strong Survive It is Survial of the Fittest.A must have for any true comic fan!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Milleynti Milleynti
Cool to read the official backstory, but 90s comics - they were all just so bad. They need to reboot this backstory.
Erennge Erennge
Love it
Уou ll never walk alone Уou ll never walk alone
They should make a movie about this. Before the X-men, before everything, there was Apocalypse. A tale as old as time!
Skunk Black Skunk Black
Another trade paperback where I have to mention that I don't have this format of the material; I have the original four-issue mini-series.

Both as an essential piece of the X-Men continuity and an individual piece of storytelling that could be read by anyone unfamiliar with the X-mythos, "The Rise Of Apocalypse" is one of the great pieces of literature ever presented in comic book format. Probably more rewarding if you've been long familiar with the entity known as Apocalypse, this could nonetheless serve as the first X-Men story you've ever read, taking place as it does entirely in ancient Egypt, eons before the formation of the X-Men or the births of Charles Xavier and Erik Lensherr, or even the dawn of Sinister (magnificently told in the "Further Adventures Of Cyclops And Phoenix" trade paperback, possibly THE greatest 4-issue mini-series Marvel has ever published). Taking place at the beginning of the building of the pyramids, the book tells the tale of Apocalypse, aka En Sabah Nur, apparantly the first Homo Superior mutation in world history. Chronicles a period of years, from his very beginnings as a newborn infant left by his tribe to die out in a sandstorm because of their fear of his mutated physical appearance to his dawn as early conqueror and the manifestation of the first hints of his true power potential. It performs a difficult task in arousing sympathy for the character without diminishing the evil of what you know he's going to become. For a few years Marvel had been making the mistake of turning almost all their top-tier villains good; it's good to do that sometimes, and it's good to have characters like Magneto and Doom who can often straddle the line between 'good guy' and 'bad guy' distinctions, but if you turn All your villains into straight-up 'good' characters, you're left with no adversaries higher than Tier 2. This book makes one empathise with En Sabah Nur while superbly foreshadowing the eternal terror and bane on the world he's to become, both making the character even more frightening and adding a previously undreamt-of air of tragedy.

There is not a single appearance by any of the other main 'X-Men' characters, but the tale ingeniously weaves in the Fantastic Four by juxtaposing itself with an FF/Rama-Tut time travel story originally told in the 60s (I believe) and takes place in the exact same time frame without even a hint of contrivance. The FF doesn't have a large role but Rama-Tut is a major player and fills his role perfectly.

An outstanding book, amongst the best X-material in Trade Paperback form out there. Definately among the best things Terry Kavanagh has ever written.
Brakora Brakora
Apocalypse, one of the strongest characters in the Marvel universe, has long deserved a strong origin story for a long time. Sadly, this isn't it. The story starts off with a roar. The first 40 or so pages develop an interesting story with En Sabah Nur being cast out from his tribe for his mutation and perceived weakness, then the infant is found by a tough nomadic tribe that believes in survival of the fittest over all else. This is certainly a way to explain the beginnings of Apocalypse's obsession.

Unfortunately, after the first 40 or so pages, it seems both scripter Kavanagh and penciller Pollina loose interest and they have to have people brought in to help them finish. That might be because in the middle of a story in ancient Egypt, the Fantastic Four are brought in. I know technically they did travel to this time period, but why this has to be included in the middle of an Apocalypse story is beyond me.

Kavanagh has produced great work before and will again. Adam Pollina remains one of my favorite pencillers for his off beat style. My fear of Apocalypse continues, but this is one graphic where the stars did not line up right. It's a weak effort, and should probably be avoided unless you're a die hard X-Men fan.
Kavanagh & Pollina put together a decent story here that tells the untold origin of Apocalpyse, one of the X-Universe's greatest villains. I loved the ties to ancient Egypt and even Rama-Tut but the ties to the Marvel Universe were to loose. They were mentioned and even shown but too quickly glossed over. This series could have used two more issues to expand on the back story. The art was at times hard to distinguish between characters. I loved certain panels and then scratched my head on others. Overall, the ideas were good but the execution wasn't.