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eBook European Invention of African Slavery: Origins of the Atlantic Slave Trade in West Africa and the African Diaspora in the Americas ePub

eBook European Invention of African Slavery: Origins of the Atlantic Slave Trade in West Africa and the African Diaspora in the Americas ePub

by Emmanuel Konde

  • ISBN: 0759354340
  • Category: Africa
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Emmanuel Konde
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Custom Publishing; 1 edition (May 26, 2005)
  • Pages: 200
  • ePub book: 1815 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1735 kb
  • Other: mbr docx txt doc
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 994

Description

Start by marking European Invention of African Slavery: Origins .

Start by marking European Invention of African Slavery: Origins of the Atlantic Slave Trade in West Africa and the African Diaspora in the Americas as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Read by Emmanuel Konde. It posits slavery and the trade in human cargo as European cultural transmissions to West Africa, much like European religion, edu European Invention of African Slavery is the first ever study of the origins of the Atlantic slave trade in West Africa. The investigation is executed through a critical textual analysis of the published literature since the eighteenth century.

European Invention of African Slavery is the first ever study of the origins of the Atlantic slave trade in West Africa.

The African Diaspora, made up largely of descendants of Africans forcibly re- moved from the continent of Africa, operates in a similar fashion to other dispersed communities (Manning 2009).

See Arab slave trade, Atlantic slave trade, Maafa, and Slavery in contemporary Africa for other . Many slave relationships in Africa revolved around domestic slavery, where slaves would work primarily in the house of the master but retain some freedoms.

See Arab slave trade, Atlantic slave trade, Maafa, and Slavery in contemporary Africa for other discussions. The main slave routes in medieval Africa. Part of a series on Slavery. Domestic slaves could be considered part of the master's household and would not be sold to others without extreme cause. The slaves could own the profits from their labour (whether in land or in products), and could marry and pass the land on to their children in many cases.

West Africa before European intervention. African History: a Very Short Introduction by John Parker and Richard Rathbone (Oxford, 2007). Africa's economic and social development before 1500 may arguably have been ahead of Europe's. It was gold from the great empires of West Africa, Ghana, Mali and Songhay that provided the means for the economic take-off of Europe in the 13th and 14th centuries and aroused the interest of Europeans in western Africa. An 'African Diaspora' or dispersal of Africans outside Africa was created in the modern world. The African Slave Trade from 15th to the 19th Centuries (UNESCO Reports and Papers (2), 1999).

The Atlantic slave trade or transatlantic slave trade involved the transportation by slave traders of enslaved African people, mainly to the Americas. The slave trade regularly used the triangular trade route and its Middle Passage, and existed from. The slave trade regularly used the triangular trade route and its Middle Passage, and existed from the 16th to the 19th centuries.

to West Africa 30 Origins of this Study, 36 The Argument in Perspective, 39 Implantation of European Culture .

to West Africa 30 Origins of this Study, 36 The Argument in Perspective, 39 Implantation of European Culture of Slavery in West Africa, 46 Chapter 3 Western Scholarship and the Universality of Slavery 49 Patterson's Natal Alienation Thesis, 51 Cultural Continuity and Institutional Transference, 64 Chapter 4 Slavery and the Problem of Definition 78 On Slavery and Limbry, 79 African Slavery Prior. to European Incursions?, 85 Delineating the Progress of the Slave Trade, 89 On History and Histrionics, 96 Chapter 5 Afrocentric Intellectual Revolution 99 A War of Ideas, 100 ii.

Slavery in Africa Information on how many slaves were shipped from Africa across the Atlantic to the Americas during the sixteenth century can only be estimated as very few records exist fo. .

Whether slavery existed within sub-Saharan African Iron Age kingdoms before the arrival of Europeans is hotly contested among African studies scholars. What is certain is that Africans were subjected to several forms of slavery over the centuries, including chattel slavery under both the imperial Muslims with the trans-Saharan slave trade and imperial Christian Europeans through the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Information on how many slaves were shipped from Africa across the Atlantic to the Americas during the sixteenth century can only be estimated as very few records exist for this period.

Origins of the Atlantic Slave Trade in West Africa and the African Diaspora in the Americas. Published May 26, 2005 by Custom Publishing.

Early West African society African societies practiced human bondage long before the Atlantic slave trade began

Early West African society. West Africa stretches from modern-day Mauritania to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It encompasses lush rainforests along the equator, savannas on either side of the forest, and much drier land to the north. African societies practiced human bondage long before the Atlantic slave trade began. Famine or fear of stronger enemies might force one tribe to ask another for help and give themselves in bondage in exchange for assistance. Similar to the European serf system, those seeking protection or relief from starvation would become the servants of those who provided relief. Debt might also be worked off through some form of servitude.

European Invention of African Slavery is the first ever study of the origins of the Atlantic slave trade in West Africa. The investigation is executed through a critical textual analysis of the published literature since the eighteenth century. It posits slavery and the trade in human cargo as European cultural transmissions to West Africa, much like European religion, educational traditions, languages, modes of dressing, and mannerisms brought to Africa by European imperialists. Arguing that the commoditization of man by man is what constitutes slavery and the slave trade, the book traces that cultural practice to the ancient Greeks who passed it down to the Romans and Europeans and demonstrates that African systems of social organization were inimical to the reduction of human beings to the status of commodity. Much of what European and Euro-American scholars have written about the Atlantic slave trade is depicted as fiction, concocted to cover up the evil perpetrated on Africans by European dealers in human cargo. A work of monumental depth and reach, it presents nearly all the arguments advanced for and against the African origin of the Atlantic slave trade. It is an exceptional text for teaching and referencing.