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eBook Blue Water Patriots: The American Revolution Afloat ePub

eBook Blue Water Patriots: The American Revolution Afloat ePub

by James M. Volo

  • ISBN: 0275989070
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: James M. Volo
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Praeger (November 30, 2006)
  • Pages: 312
  • ePub book: 1211 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1837 kb
  • Other: txt azw lit docx
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 103

Description

Volo's Blue Water Patriots does just that A comprehensive overview of the naval aspects of the American Revolution from the Patriot's perspective.

Volo's Blue Water Patriots does just that. In this single volume, readers will find every element that they could ever want of the Revolutionary War at sea. The author summarizes the problems of creating a national navy, discusses the men who served on the ships, and describes the outcomes of their battles. A comprehensive overview of the naval aspects of the American Revolution from the Patriot's perspective.

The American Revolution was a watershed in this regard with improved warship designs, new technologies .

The American Revolution was a watershed in this regard with improved warship designs, new technologies, improved gunpowder and communications, and innovative tactics. Among his published works are Blue Water Patriots: The American Revolution Afloat (Greenwood, 2006), Daily Life in Civil War America (Greenwood, 1998), Family Life in the 19th Century (Greenwood, 2007), the Popular Culture of the Antebellum Period (Greenwood, 2004), and the Encyclopedia of the Antebellum South (Greenwood, 2000). Several of which were co-authored with his wife Dorothy Denneen Volo. Presently, Dr. Volo teaches at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, Connecticut.

Blue Water Patriots book. Start by marking Blue Water Patriots: The American Revolution Afloat as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

In 1775, it was inconceivable that the American colonists could have overcome the overwhelming military superiority of Great Britain. Yet the belligerent colonists seemed certain that they could defeat the British army they so despised.

The American Journal of Ambrose Serle, Secretary to Lord Howe 1776-1778 is a primary source in the history of the American Revolution. Volo, James M. (2007). Blue water patriots: the American Revolution afloat. New York: Praeger Publishers. p. 182. ISBN 978-0-275-98907-1.

The American Journal of Ambrose Serle, Secretary to Lord Howe 1776-1778 is a primary source in the history of the American Revolution Serle also wrote two well-known devotional books.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. 7 Mb. The Antebellum Period (American Popular Culture Through History). James M. Volo, Dorothy Denneen Volo. 4 Mb. Daily Life in the Age of Sail: (The Greenwood Press ''Daily Life Through History'' Series). Dorothy Denneen Volo, James M. Volo. 1. 5 Mb. Family life in Native America. 0 Mb.

BLUE WATER PATRIOTS: The American Revolution Afloat JAMES M. VOLO PRAEGER BLUE WATER PATRIOTS The . A. MANETTE A NSAY An e-book excerpt from For Jake Smith; for Genevieve; for the cruisers we met along the way; for. VOLO PRAEGER BLUE WATER PATRIOTS The American Revolutio. Empire of Blue Water. Crisis, Revolution, and Russian Jews.

Nebraska Section - American Water Works Association. Public & government service. Recommended by 4 people. Great gentlemen seeking to memorialize patriots. 4 May. 18 January 2018. Sons of the American Revolution: Robert Treat Paine Chapter: Mass. Non-profit organisation.

James M. Volo, PhD has been teaching physics, physical science, and astronomy for the past 39 years

James M. Volo, PhD has been teaching physics, physical science, and astronomy for the past 39 years. He received his bachelor's from City College in New York, his masters from American Military University, and his doctorate from Berne University.

In 1775, it seemed inconceivable that the American colonists could overcome the overwhelming military superiority of Great Britain. Yet the belligerent colonists were certain they could defeat the British army they so despised. On the other hand, their one great fear was that they would not be able to overcome the presence of the Royal Navy. Somehow though, the colonists were able to resist the British at sea, attract capable allies, and successfully conclude their quest for independence. The primary focus of this work is the period prior to 1779 before the French had come to the aid of the fledgling American nation―when the Blue Water Patriots confronted the Royal Navy alone, relying on little more than ingenuity and courage.

In 1775, it was inconceivable that the American colonists could have overcome the overwhelming military superiority of Great Britain. Yet the belligerent colonists seemed certain that they could defeat the British army they so despised. On the other hand, the one great fear shared by all colonists was that they would not be able to overcome the presence of the Royal Navy. Yet, somehow, the colonists were able to resist the British at sea, attract capable allies to aid them, and successfully conclude their quest for independence. The American Revolution can safely be viewed as part of a prolonged worldwide naval conflict between France and Britain beginning with the Glorious Revolution in 1688 and ending with the British victory at Trafalgar in 1805 during the Napoleonic Wars. This was a period in which the armed merchantmen of the age of trade were replaced by genuine warships whose task was to control the sea lanes. The American Revolution was a watershed in this regard with improved warship designs, new technologies, improved gunpowder and communications, and innovative tactics. Although French participation in the war for independence was crucial, the primary focus of this work is the period before 1779, when the colonists confronted the Royal Navy alone with only their ingenuity and courage to defend them.

Every school child knows that the American Revolution began on Lexington Green in April, 1775, but how many are aware that in 1764 a Royal Navy cutter, St. John, engaged in the suppression of smuggling, was fired upon by Rhode Islanders; that in 1769, the revenue sloop Liberty was seized and burned by the people of Newport; or that in 1772, the navy cutter Gaspee was burned in the night by armed patriots attacking from small boats. These Blue Water Patriots fought the first battles on the road to American independence. This is their story.

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BLUE WATER PATRIOTS: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AFLOAT
JAMES M. VOLO
ROWMAN & LITTLEFIELD PUBLISHING GROUP, 2006
QUALITY SOFTCOVER, $18.95, 320 PAGES, APPENDICES, MAPS, NOTES, ILLUSTRATIONS, BIBLIOGRAPHY, PHOTOGRAPHS

"In any operation and under all circumstances a decisive naval superiority is to be considered as a fundamental principle, and the basis upon which every hope of success must ultimately depend"-Washington wrote to Lafayette during the American Revolution. The war at sea changed its characteristics during the American Revolution. In the early stages, when the conflict was purely Anglo-American, the British held the mastery of the seas in that the Royal Navy's line of battle remained unchallenged. However, American colonial navies and privateers could provide a severe challenge to trade and stretch British resources. In 1778, the British edge deteriorated after the French entered the conflict. Despite the French Navy being smaller than the British, its admirals, such as de Grasse and Suffren, posed intense threats to Britain. In 1779, Spain joined France and the total naval balance, in numbers but not necessarily quality, was overturned. Britain's position was further weakened when Holland joined France and Spain in 1781. However, although outnumbered after 1778, Britain seldom lost local naval superiority except before Yorktown, a crucial situation benefiting Washington and Rochambeau in their march to Yorktown and their reinforcement of Lafayette in surrounding Cornwallis. Elsewhere, Britain, either through plan or accident, managed to defeat small enemy squadrons piecemeal: at Ulshant, Cape St. Vincent, the Dogger Bank, and Ulshant again. Only at the end of the war were British logistics stretched to a breaking point, but they managed to continue to finance the huge global struggle because of superior taxation and credit system. France slipped into financial collapse and revolution in 1789, partially as a result of the enormous costs of both the French and Indian War and the American Revolution. The colonists didn't have years to organize their navy. Instead, the colonists were faced with the almost impossible task of creating a navy from scratch when they declared their independence from Great Britain. It isn't surprising that the colonists failed; rather it is amazing that they accomplished anything at all. The first warships of the young nation were converted merchant ships; the first officers were taken from the merchant marine or were political appointees. Some of the new captains-John Paul Jones and Nicholas Biddle to name a few-were charismatic leaders with courage and brilliance, and were equal to the best foreign captains. Many more officers, however, proved entirely lacking in the required skills, and were as bad as the worst officers in other navies. Hardly any of the first group of officers had any prior combat experience. American warships came from three sources: the Continental (national) Navy, the various states' navies, and privateers. The Continental Navy was raised by decree of the Continental Congress, and was intended to be a regular navy, modeled on the lines of the British Royal Navy. Most of the states also raised their own navies, using them mainly for coastal defense. Lastly, private citizens could obtain letters of marque. These were licenses allowing them legally to capture enemy ships or "prizes" and make whatever profit from their prizes that they could. It was a lucrative but risky business; while some captains made their fortunes seizing and selling British merchant ships and crew, many others were captured, and languished in British prison hulls. There were some 70,000 colonial seamen involved in privateering! On December 13, 1775, the Continental Congress authorized the construction of thirteen frigates, one to represent each of the rebellious colonies. These frigates were to form the backbone of the new American Navy. These ships were in general larger than British ships of the same type, and appear to have been generally well-designed ships, despite their shipwrights' lack of experience in designing warships. Six of the thirteen were captured or burnt to avoid capture before ever putting to sea. All of the remaining seven were destroyed or captured by July, 1781, and most of them accomplished little before meeting their fates. Before the first batch of frigates had been completed, Congress passed a new naval act calling for the construction of three 74-gun ships of the line and five 36-gun frigates, in addition to smaller ships. This was a grandiose plan that was soon shown to be completely impractical, and in the end only the America (74 guns) and the Alliance (36 guns) were ever completed. In the end, the British Royal Navy failed in the American Revolution for a number of reasons: the war had became a sideshow when the French threatened the British Empire as a whole, factionalism, personal vendettas, a lack of resources, and the lack of a coherent strategy. BLUE WATER PATRIOTS: THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION AFLOAT recognizes the American Revolution as a maritime conflict and fully explores the struggle for command of the sea. Broad and balanced in vision, it is the first study to mesh the operations of the young Continental Navy and various state navies with the movements of the British and French fleets. Through his careful examination of the role played by the Continental Navy, author James M. Volo makes it clear that the outcome of the American Revolution was decided not at Yorktown but at sea.

Lt. Colonel Robert A. Lynn, Florida Guard
Orlando, Florida
Gavidor Gavidor
"Blue water Patriots', an aggravating book fit only to be used as a fly-swatter, repeatedly insults American patriots' motives, thoughts, and opinions before and during the ARW without any basis in facts in the form of quotes from letters or speeches of specific persons of that time. This is a "take the names and dates" collection, that's more "BNA Tory" in attitude than Whig, (British or American). The author would have been liberally coated in 78 degree F. tar, and feathers, rather than winning a B. A. for scholarship, had he written this mulch in Boston in 1775.

In the same sentence in which he calls groups of British sailors "jack-tars", (customarily armed for 1774 impressment duties in Boston with wooden cudgels the size and weight of Babe Ruth's baseball bats), he calls the unarmed colonial farmers and sailors confronted by them "thugs". He mentions that colonials were upset about the actions of certain British Navy ships patrolling the waters near isolated communities; but never says why. He never mentions that at least one of the captains whose ships were burned to the waterline by angry Americans made it his barely-legal habit to send bands of his ship's "jack-tars" sweeping into isolated farms, where they took part or all of a year's hard-earned winter food stores, paying with paper script which could only be redeemed in cities hundreds of miles away by sea.

The book is derivative, however it appears to have derived only the attitudes of British Tories during their most foolish period of British rule, not the reasoned opinions of the men of time, British or American.

He writes of the Stamp Act and the Intolerable Acts as if they were good things that the colonials just didn't understand. This book is a sly slam on our cash-poor, hard-working, brave, long-dead ancestors, long after the fact. Don't waste your money, time, or emotional peace-of-mind on wanting to rip it up with your bare hands. SKIP IT!
Tojahn Tojahn
I was fortunate to have met the author at a book signing at Connecticut's Mystic Seaport - an appropriate outlet for this book! At first, I thought that this was "just another history book", but after a few minutes of talking with Mr. Volo, I was impressed with his knowledge of naval events during the Revolutionary war against England.

Most of can recall a naval battle or two during the Revolutionary war, and perhaps a quote by John Paul Jones, but what do we really know about the naval aspect of the Revolutionary war? During the Revolutionary war, England was the world's premiere naval power, while the Colonies were barely more than assembling of like-minded people. With just a handful of ships, how did the Colonials defeat such a superior naval power?

Many of the battles that were keys to winning the Revolutionary war are barely known, or at best, briefly discussed and glossed over in traditional history classes, while the author delves into detail about the naval engagements, how they supported the land troops, and how the Admiralty of England's navy unwittingly helped the Colonials by much infighting.

If you have a love for history, or even just a passing interest in ships, I highly recommend this book. This is certainly one "sea worthy" book!