cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Deadlines and Overtimes: Collected Writings on Sports and Life
eBook Deadlines and Overtimes: Collected Writings on Sports and Life ePub

eBook Deadlines and Overtimes: Collected Writings on Sports and Life ePub

by Bill Lyon

  • ISBN: 1933822163
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Bill Lyon
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Camino Books Inc; 1st edition (September 1, 2009)
  • Pages: 224
  • ePub book: 1314 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1246 kb
  • Other: azw lrf txt docx
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 124

Description

Deadlines And Overtimes book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Deadlines And Overtimes: Collected Writings On Sports And Life as Want to Read: Want to Read saving.

Deadlines And Overtimes book. Start by marking Deadlines And Overtimes: Collected Writings On Sports And Life as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

A retrospective of 33 years of memorable reflections from the Philadelphia Inquirer s voice of Philly sports, Bill Lyon. Deadlines and Overtimes : Collected Writings on Sports and Life.

Being Red in Philadelphia: A Memoir of the McCarthy Era. $ 2. 0 USD. Big Al: Fifty Years of Adventures in Sports Broadcasting. 2. 5 USD. Blood and Honor: Inside the Scarfo Mob-The Mafia's Most Violent Family.

Download PDF book format. Sports Pennsylvania Philadelphia History Professional sports Sports journalism United States. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Deadlines and overtimes : collected writings on sports and life Bill Lyon. Book's title: Deadlines and overtimes : collected writings on sports and life Bill Lyon. Library of Congress Control Number: 2009017686. Download now Deadlines and overtimes : collected writings on sports and life Bill Lyon. Download PDF book format. Download DOC book format.

Sports Pennsylvania Philadelphia History Professional sports Sports journalism United States. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. by Charlotte Templin. ISBN: 0700607080 (cloth : alk. paper) Author: Templin, Charlotte. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database.

Philadelphia sports fans have been reading Lyon’s columns for close to four decades . It also brings an old pregame routine back to life. le with Al, and they are inspiring. He sure hasn’t taken away your wit or your way with words.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Deadlines and overtimes. collected writings on sports and life. Published 2009 by Camino Books in Philadelphia. History, Sports, Sports journalism, Philadelphia inquirer, Professional sports. Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, United States.

Deadline Last Thursday I praised Bill’s plan to win the war on terror with an international army of 25,000 paid mercenarie. ut somehow, folks, Bill O’Reilly took Bill O’ffense, Colbert continued. Follow Us. Alerts & Newsletters.

Last Thursday I praised Bill’s plan to win the war on terror with an international army of 25,000 paid mercenarie.

A retrospective of 33 years of memorable reflections from the Philadelphia Inquirer s voice of Philly sports, Bill Lyon. With columns that cover as many sporting events as Lyon did including seven Olympics, more than two dozen Super Bowls, 11 NBA Finals, 17 U.S. Opens and dozens of fights, bowls, baseball playoffs and Final Fours Deadlines and Overtimes is a look back...and through lasting insights, a look forward...at local, regional, national and worldwide sports. With his trademark humor and vast knowledge of the games that form part of the fabric of American life and a uniquely Philadelphia spirit, Lyon captures the essence of sports and sportswriting. Read cover-to-cover or flip through to any page to start enjoying these accessible and insightful gems from a master of sportswriting.

Comments

Risinal Risinal
So I'm 25 and have never lived in Philly. I read some of Bill Lyons reporting online and thought the book would be a collection of his articles. Rather this is a collection of his personal column. While the right is fantastic, I was often times either too young to recall the events he was speaking about or not informed enough on the history of Philly sports (I from SC).
Kahavor Kahavor
It doesn't matter if it's sports,business,the arts,writers,performers,or politicians, I've always been a fan of greatness.

What makes them so special, so universal, always viewed as the "Best."

Bill Lyon is the best. So say scores of writers, commentators, and readers.

Pick up the book and read his articles on every big event in the sports world.

I gave my friend Bill's book as a gift.

He wrote to me that he planned to read a few pages each night.

He couldn't put it down and finished in in 24 hours.

As the commerical used to say..."Try it, you'll like it!!!!"
HappyLove HappyLove
Bill Lyon is the best sports writer of all time. He is in the Pennsylvania Sports Hall of Fame and should be in every national hall of frame for every sport. When you read this book as well as his others you feel as if you are at the event he is writing about.Every sport fan should have a copy of this book.
Winotterin Winotterin
I've always loved Bill Lyon's columns in the Philadelphia Inquirer and was so glad to hear about this book. It's a great read, I highly recommend it!
Мох Мох
Amazing writer. Enjoyable read.
Via Via
There is something to be said about the level of sports journalism practiced in today's blogs, e-zines, and the like...it is mostly awful. The snark, the air of superiority, the ever evident need to bully one's opinion can be found lurking beneath each click baited headline. There are few places for the sports lover and the lover of words to coexist in today's landscape. Fortunately there is this collection of articles by former Philadelphia Inquire and Sports Writing Hall of Famer Bill Lyon to fill the void.

It won't take the reader long to see the ingenious ways Mr. Lyon can blend poetry with sports, turning phrases with subtle grace and well wrought wordsmithing. Indeed within the first few pages you will find the humor, humanity, and hubris-free stylings that made him so popular in the Philly printed news sports beat. Part of that grace lies in his own honest assessment of his profession; "...the deathless prose I would be offering up would serve as a repository for eggshells and coffee grounds, as lining for the bottoms of bird cages, and as bladder training for puppies who were equally enthusiastic."

But the larger part comes from his innate understanding that though news print media (sports especially) was not necessarily the highest rung of the literary ladder, it still was part of the ladder and should be written as such. Even more so it was a form of literature with the specific purpose of "comforting the afflicted and afflicting the comfortable." A place where a young sportswriter circa 1956 "...yearned to chronicle tales of heroic men and women at play....We turn to the front page to read of man's failures and shortcomings; we turn to the sports pages to read of his triumphs. Reality in one place, refuge in the other."

And what refuge Mr. Lyon provides!

In what plays like a greatest hits collection, Mr. Lyon covers sports with a generous sprinklings of metaphor, anecdotes, poetry, and facts. The collection covers all the American past times (Baseball, Football, Basketball, Hockey) and provides ample space to Boxing, Horse Racing, Golf, and even several different Olympic Games. Sometimes he takes a sport straight on in an attempt to explain a nuance; to educate as well as entertain.

For instance, in one section he provides 10 consecutive articles that explain in detail each of the positions in baseball (plus the manager). Details range from what is needed in each to succeed, as well as a qualified opinion as to which players were the gold standards. In that particularly enjoyable series stats were slathered with prose to build a cathedral in which to worship.

Take his explanation of position 9, Right Field:

"In the beginning, it's Devil Island. It is a place of exile. It is where you station the fat kid. Or the one with glasses. And then you hope no one hits a ball out there....But as you move up in competition, right field begins to assume importance and cachet and glamour....The prototype number nine hits for average and for power - say .330, with 50 doubles, 30 homers, 100 driven in, 100 scored."

In others he is describing in great detail one of the many heartwarming moments in sports. The moments that give you something to reach for like hope (a perfect golf ball found in the wreckage of 9/11) or love (Tim and Kathy Kerr), to reminisce (his first game with his grandson) and to awe with respect (his recounting of Mo Cheeks & the Star Spangled Banner). Whether saying goodbye to a stadium, wishing for a parade, or eulogizing at the great sports figures (players, coaches, owners, etc.) who have departed Mr. Lyon does so both effectively and with real affection. There is no trash talk or snark. There is no belittling. At times the respect may be begrudging, such as when juiced up Barry Bonds is shattering a record, but even then Lyon keeps things above the belt.

As a sports fan it is equally fascinating to see articles from the 80's and 90's about figures that have since fell from grace. For instance talking about the bright eyed hope that a pre-PED A-Rod will help wash out the taste of a Barry Bonds or to see the portrayal of a yet-to-be-tainted Joe Paterno or an unstoppable Tiger Woods winning his 43rd PGA in sudden death against Chris DiMarco. Juxtaposed against their current statuses these giants are the archetype of the shooting stars covered elsewhere in his book.

In the short time it took to devour Mr. Lyon's wonderful book I laughed, I got teary eyed, and both more than once. I read articles that made me think (Prison Football), that made me smile (die hard Philly) and swell with pride (Army vs Navy). Not once was I bored nor felt that any of the time I invested in the 209 pages were wasted. Certainly given his geography, the book is very Philly heavy. If you are from the area or the era (1980's on) you will easily rank this book in your top 10 sports faves. But even if you are outside the zip code, there is more than enough national figures, general sports talk, and wonderful writing to justify your purchase.