cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The History of the Sixteenth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment: We Were Spoiling for a Fight
eBook The History of the Sixteenth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment: We Were Spoiling for a Fight ePub

eBook The History of the Sixteenth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment: We Were Spoiling for a Fight ePub

by Jamie Gillum

  • ISBN: 1461112907
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Jamie Gillum
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (April 30, 2011)
  • Pages: 198
  • ePub book: 1763 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1334 kb
  • Other: lrf mbr docx txt
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 178

Description

Gillum claims that this is not your ordinary regimental history, and I agree. An interesting and well-written telling of the daily life of men in the Sixteenth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment during the first 16 months of the Civil War (April, 1861-August, 1862)

Gillum claims that this is not your ordinary regimental history, and I agree. I think Gillum has set the standard for Confederate regimental histories for some time to come. An interesting and well-written telling of the daily life of men in the Sixteenth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment during the first 16 months of the Civil War (April, 1861-August, 1862).

The Sixteenth Tennessee Infantry is one of the most documented regiments of the southern Confederacy .

The Sixteenth Tennessee Infantry is one of the most documented regiments of the southern Confederacy in the American Civil War. For this reason, this regiment was selected to portray the everyday life of Confederate soldiers through one of the toughest struggles in American history. Included are photos, illustrations, maps and a day to day biography of the regiment as a whole. -From the Preface to the series.

This final volume follows the Sixteenth Tennessee through the last sixteen months of the war. It covers the engagements of the Atlanta campaign as well as the Tennessee Campaign, the retreat to Tupelo and the movement to North Carolina prior to the surrender.

The 6th Regiment Tennessee Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 6th Tennessee Infantry was organized at Williamsburg and Boston, Kentucky and mustered in for a three-year enlistm. The 6th Tennessee Infantry was organized at Williamsburg and Boston, Kentucky and mustered in for a three-year enlistment on April 18, 1862. The regiment was attached to 25th Brigade, 7th Division, Army of the Ohio, to October 1862. 1st Brigade, District of West Virginia, Department of the Ohio, to November 1862

This book probably is not for everyone.

This book probably is not for everyone. But if you are a student of the Civil War and, especially, if you have ancestors who fought on the Confederate side and most especially if they were in the 11th Tennessee then you might find this a fascinating read.

The 16th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the . For a few last moments our little regiment defended angrily its hopeless challenge, but it was useless to fight longer," Abner Small of the 16th Maine wrote after the battle.

The 16th Regiment Maine Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was particularly noted for its service during the 1863 Battle of Gettysburg. YouTube Encyclopedic. We looked at our colors, and our faces burned. We must not surrender those symbols of our pride and our faith. For this reason, this regiment was selected to portray the everyday life of Confederate soldiers through one of the toughest struggles in American.

5th Regiment Tennessee Volunteer Infantry. The 5th Regiment Tennessee Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The 5th Tennessee Infantry. The 5th Tennessee Infantry was organized at Barbourville, Kentucky and Harrison, Tennessee February through March 1862 and mustered in for a three year enlistment.

This is the story of the Sixteenth Tennessee Infantry Regiment in the American Civil War. Where they were, who they fought and what they did is chronicled in this day by day account of the lives of the boys in this Confederate regiment. This study is written in three volumes, each covering about sixteen months of the war. From an immense number of surviving sources including letters, diaries (some never published) and memoirs comes the fascinating story of common soldiers in the most trying and difficult ordeal of their lives. A great reference for those interested in the Army of Tennessee, Cheatham's Division or Donelson's/Wright's/Carter's/Maney's Brigades. Volume I - April 1861 to August 1862 - chronicles their organization and their campaigns in the mountians of Virginia, the South Carolina coast and the contest for Corinth, Mississippi with preparations for the Kentucky Campaign. Volume II - September 1862 to December 1863 - includes the Battles of Perryville, Murfressboro, the Tullahoma Campaign, the Battles of Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and withdrawal to Dalton, Georgia. Volume III - January 1864 thru May 1865 - includes the battles and skirmishes of the Atlanta Campaign (Resaca, Marietta, July 20th and 22nd), Jonesboro, Franklin, Nashville, the retreat from Tennessee with the final battle at Bentonville. It also chronicles their return home and the hardships that faced the men and their families. Learn thier hopes, thier joys and their fears in this consolidated diary of a regiment of Tennessee volunteers. Experience triumph, death, desertion and despair alongside the men who lived it and continued Tennessee's legacy of bravery and patriotism in America's greatest struggle.

Comments

Kann Kann
Jamie Gillum's book, The History of the Sixteenth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Vol. I, We Were Spoiling for a Fight, April 1861 - August 1862, is an exceptionally well-done introductory volume of what would become one of the regiments of Ben Cheatham's famed all-Tennessee division of the Confederate Army of Tennessee. Gillum claims that this is not your ordinary regimental history, and I agree. I think Gillum has set the standard for Confederate regimental histories for some time to come. The book is excellently researched and is based on numerous and varied primary source accounts. While the book does contain the daily movements and activities of the 16th Tennessee regiment as a whole, which a good regimental history surely must, the book does not read as a stodgy or rigid military history. Interspersed throughout the accompanying footnotes are interesting biographical entries of selected men who are mentioned in the text. The flowing narrative opens with a brief, but necessary background that gives one a view into the complex political attitudes and viewpoints of citizens who were living in the fringe counties of anti-slavery East Tennessee and what would lead them to join the Confederate army. As the narrative progresses, Gillum weaves a tapestry of personal accounts giving the reader an understanding of the regiment as a whole in the broader military context, while at the same time bringing the perspectives and experiences of the common soldier into shining detail. After reading volume 1, I feel as though I know Colonel John Savage, Captain J. J. Womack, and Private Roysdon Etter, in particular. Volume 1 covers the first sixteen months of the war, and examines the soldiers' experiences from enlisting as volunteers, to training at Camp Trousdale, to their initial baptism of fire under Robert E. Lee in Virginia, to their transfer to the South Carolina coast, to their assignment with the Army of Mississippi at Corinth, Mississippi, and their movement with the army to Chattanooga, Tennessee. My only disappointment is that I wish I had volumes 2 and 3 in hand, because I am eager to discover more about the history, contributions, and experiences of this fine Tennessee regiment of Cheatham's Division and the stories of the men who comprised it.
Dr. Todd Cathey
Regimental Historian
11th Tennessee Infantry Volunteers
Zadora Zadora
My husband specifically requested this book and "The Battle of Perryville and the Sixteenth Tennessee Infantry Regiment...," also by Jamie Gillum, because he has ancestors who fought in this regiment. As a Civil War buff, he is always delighted to find well-written accounts of the battles in which this regiment participated. Would highly recommend this to anyone interested in the Civil War.
anneli anneli
Excellent first hand accounts. Excerpts from letters and diaries are insightful as well as entertaining.
Road.to sliver Road.to sliver
good insight to life in a rebel regiment, soldier. diaries are awesome , because everyone saw and experienced something different on the same battlefield.
Pad Pad
An interesting and well-written telling of the daily life of men in the Sixteenth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry Regiment during the first 16 months of the Civil War (April, 1861-August, 1862). While, at first glance, the book appears to be a scholarly account with detailed, extensive footnotes, upon reading one realizes that it is, instead, a carefully crafted, first-person -- you are there -- story, full of letters, orders and interviews that pull readers into the world of these men.

I particularly enjoyed the author's focus on the daily life of the ordinary soldier and his use of narrative text from journals and letters mailed home. As an example of the tone and presentation, here's an ordinary soldier's description of Robert E. Lee: "This was the first time I had seen him. He is a fine looking man near six feet high -- a little heavy and well proportioned -- eyes blue and steady -- without whiskers -- nothing fantastic in dress, but neat and comfortable... he strikes you at once as a general." (p. 69)

This book can be viewed as a day-to-day biography of the regiment, supplemented by photographs, maps and other illustrations, and written by a former Marine whose own great-great grandfather had served in the regiment. Coverage extends from the early organization of the regiment, through the Western Virginia campaign, then the Virginia to Coastal Carolina sweep, reorganization due to casualties, followed by the campaigns for Corinth, Tupelo and then their shift to Chattanooga.

If volumes II and III are just as good as volume I, readers will want to purchase the whole set.

R. Neil Scott
Middle Tennessee State University
Na Na
There were possibly thousands of regiments in the Civil War with only a few having had histories written on their service and here with an eye-catching cover of the Confederate flag is part one of the history of the 16th Tennessee infantry.

This book is just as good as the cover suggests and is well worth reading with this volume covering their time with Robert E Lee in Virginia, where the region and its campaign remain woefully understudied; their time guarding the South Caroline coast, and then back to their home state of Tennessee and the Corinth campaign with Pierre G T Beauregard.

For anyone who is a student of the Civil War this book is well researched and relies on letters, diaries, newspapers, and journals as far as possible. The text is also well written and an `easy' read - a treat. I can't wait for volume two.

The appendices are especially valuable covering the command organization; the issue of clothing, arms, and equipment; the unit's casualties over the period of this volume; and a selection from some of the regiment's veteran's questionnaires. Finally at the end a bibliography and index.