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eBook The Paradox of Progress: Economic Change, Individual Enterprise, and Politic Culture in Michigan, 1837-1878 ePub

eBook The Paradox of Progress: Economic Change, Individual Enterprise, and Politic Culture in Michigan, 1837-1878 ePub

by Martin J. Hershock

  • ISBN: 0821415131
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Martin J. Hershock
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ohio University Press; 1 edition (December 30, 2003)
  • Pages: 344
  • ePub book: 1905 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1916 kb
  • Other: azw mbr doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 742

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The Paradox of Progress explores one of the most profound changes in American history - the transition . Winner of the 2004 Award of Merit from the Historical Society of Michigan. Martin Hershock is an associate professor of history at the University of Michigan?Dearborn

Guiding this transformation was the nineteenth-century Republican party. Martin Hershock is an associate professor of history at the University of Michigan?Dearborn. He is the author of The Paradox of Progress: Economic Change, Individual Enterprise, and Political Culture in Michigan, 1837?1878 (Ohio, 2003).

book by Martin J. Hershock.

Martin Hershock is an associate professor of history at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. He is the author of The Paradox of Progress: Economic Change, Individual Enterprise, and Political Culture in Michigan, 1837-1878 (Ohio, 2003). Series: Law Society & Politics in the Midwest.

The Paradox of Progress: Economic Change, Individual Enterprise and Political Culture in Michigan, 1837-1878, (Ohio University Press, 2003). Recipient of Historical Society of Michigan Award of Merit (2003). Awards and Recognition. Michigan Notable Book Award (2007). University of Michigan-Dearborn Alumni Society Professional Growth and Scholarship Award (2006). Historical Society of Michigan State History Award (2006). Historical Society of Michigan Award of Merit (2004). Distinguished Teaching Award, University of Michigan-Dearborn (2003).

Saved in: Bibliographic Details. Main Author: Hershock, Martin J. Format: eBook. a Electronic reproduction. Ann Arbor, Michigan : ProQuest Ebook Central, 2019. 650. 0. a Republican Party (. 1854- ) - History - 19th century. Michigan - Politics and government - 1837-1950. Michigan - Economic conditions.

The Paradox of Progress: Economic Change, Individual Enterprise, and Political Culture in Michigan, 1837-1878 more. Public Markets and Civic Culture in Nineteenth Century America more. Publication Date: Jan 1, 2005. To Shield a Bleeding Humanity: Conflict and Consensus in Mid-Nineteenth Century Michigan Political Culture more. Publication Name: Journal article by Martin J. Hershock; The Historian. Free Commoners by Law": Tradition, Transition, and the Closing of the Range in Antebellum Michigan more.

He is author of The Paradox of Progress: Economic Change, Individual Enterprise and Political Culture in Michigan, 1837-1878 (Ohio, 2003) Paul Finkelman is Chapman Distinguished Professor of Law at the University of Tulsa College of Law. He is the author of many articles and books, including His Soul Goes Marching On: Responses to John Brown and the Harpers Ferry Raid and the Library of Congress Civil War Desk Reference. Paul Finkelman, Martin J. Hershock, Clifford W. Taylor.

The Paradox of Progress: Economic Change, Individual Enterprise, and Political Culture in Michigan, 1837 – 1878. Richard Walter Thomas (1992).

Americans have long recognized the central importance of the nineteenth-century Republican party in preserving the Union, ending slavery, and opening the way for industrial capitalism. On the surface, the story seems straightforward -- the party's “free labor” ethos, embracing the opportunity that free soil presented for social and economic mobility, and condemning the danger that slavery in the territories posed for that mobility, foreshadowed the GOP's later devotion to unfettered enterprise and industrial capitalism. In reality, however, the narrative thread is not so linear. This work examines the contradiction that lay at the heart of the supremely influential ideology of the early Republican party. The Paradox of Progress explores one of the most profound changes in American history -- the transition from the anti-market, anti-monopoly, and democratic ideology of Jacksonian America to the business-dominated politics and unregulated excesses of Gilded Age capitalism. Guiding this transformation was the nineteenth-century Republican party. Drawing heavily from both the pro-market commitments of the early Whig party and the anti-capitalist culture of Jackson's Democratic party, the early Republican party found itself torn between these competing values. Nowhere was this contested process more obvious or more absorbing than in Civil War-era Michigan, the birthplace of the Republican party. In The Paradox of Progress, a fascinating look at the central factors underlying the history of the GOP, Martin Hershock reveals how in their determination to resolve their ideological dilemma, Republicans of the Civil War era struggled to contrive a formula that wo uld enable them to win popular elections and to model America's acceptance of Gilded Age capitalism.