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eBook A Respectable Army: The Military Origins of the Republic, 1763-1789 (American History Series) ePub

eBook A Respectable Army: The Military Origins of the Republic, 1763-1789 (American History Series) ePub

by James Kirby Martin

  • ISBN: 0882958127
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: James Kirby Martin
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Harlan Davidson; First Edition, Second Printing edition (January 1982)
  • Pages: 240
  • ePub book: 1999 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1969 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi azw lrf
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 271

Description

I thought it was a fine recollection of the build up of the american standing army, good parameters of time, I enjoyed it even though it was for a class.

Terry Golway, Director, Kean University Center for History, Politics and Policy. There can be no finer introduction to the military history of the American Revolution and the character of the Continental Army than this classic study. I thought it was a fine recollection of the build up of the american standing army, good parameters of time, I enjoyed it even though it was for a class. One person found this helpful.

A Respectable Army The Military Origins of the Republic, The American History Series.

A Respectable Army book. Martin and Lender bring to life a subject that area that is mostly overlooked in American history, the military origins of the republic. The main focus of military history is on the battle, the general, the heroic soldiers, but little if any ink is used writing about how to build an army and the hardships that go into that insurmountably tricky task.

James Kirby Martin is Hugh Roy and Lillie Cranz Cullen University Professor of History at the University of Houston. In addition to his scholarly work, Martin has advised and appeared on television programs airing on the History Channel and has recently begun a successful foray into feature film scriptwriting. Mark Edward Lender is Professor Emeritus of History at Kean University.

Turner on Martin and Lender, '"A Respectable Army": The Military Origins of. .James Kirby Martin and Mark Edward Lender’s thesis is simple.

Turner on Martin and Lender, '"A Respectable Army": The Military Origins of the Republic, 1763-1789'. Author: James Kirby Martin, Mark Edward Lender. If there is one book about the American Revolutionary War to have on the shelf to reflect on, study, or break in case of emergency, A Respectable Army : The Military Origins of the Republic, 1763-1789 is it. The Continental army was not a band of land-owning militia Patriots; it was a standing army fighting for a populace rather than representing the social compositions of that population in war (p. 216).

It also demonstrates the significance of Washington's leadership to the American military tradition.

book by James Kirby Martin. James Martin and co-author Mark Lender demonstrate that the Continental Army-more so than the militia-won the Revolutionary War. After the battle of Breed's Hill (AKA Bunker Hill) in which the militia surprised the British Regulars, the Continental Army became increasingly important to the revolutionary cause. It also demonstrates the significance of Washington's leadership to the American military tradition. Notes 64. 3 Toward an American Standing Army, 1776–1777 66. The Nature of the Continental Army 66. A New Model Rebel Army 70.

Home Browse Books Book details, A Respectable Army: The Military Origins of the. A Respectable Army: The Military Origins of the Republic, 1763-1789. By James Kirby Martin, Mark Edward Lender. Their objective was to reach beyond the traditional focus of military studies-the flow of guns, combat, and tactics that influenced the immediate outcome of battles and martial conflicts, often with little reference to broader historical contexts.

Автор: Martin, James Kirby Lender, . Ideas about American & manners& were reflected and conveyed through works of ballet, literature, opera, and satire. Описание: Part of the "Chicago History of American Civilization" series, which provides a nuanced and vibrant portrait of the United States from its inception through the twentieth century.

The proponents of the “new” military history were just gaining full momentum, when this book was first published in 1982. Their objective was to reach beyond the traditional focus of military studies—the flow of guns, combat, and tactics that influenced the immediate outcome of battles and martial conflicts, often with little reference to broader historical contexts. Believing that one cannot fully appreciate the Revolution without reckoning with the War for Independence and its effects in helping to shape the new American republic, Martin and Lender move beyond the deeply ingrained national mythology about the essence of the war effort, so neatly personified by the imagery of the embattled freehold farmer as the quintessential warrior of the Revolution. Then they integrate, not persist in keeping separate, the fascinating history of the real Continental army into the mainstream of writing about the nation-making experience of the United States. Extensive index and each chapter includes a bibliography.

Comments

Mazuzahn Mazuzahn
Great book!! Thank you!!
Mitynarit Mitynarit
Great invite on the truth about the American Revolution. Absolutely no romanticizing here!
Hǻrley Quinn Hǻrley Quinn
James Martin and co-author Mark Lender demonstrate that the Continental Army--more so than the militia--won the Revolutionary War. After the battle of Breed's Hill (AKA Bunker Hill) in which the militia surprised the British Regulars, the Continental Army became increasingly important to the revolutionary cause. Without a decisive victory against Washington and the Continental Army the British could not win the war. Martin and Lender repeatedly drive this point home with well researched facts and quotes that tell a compelling story of the 'Continentals.' "A Respectable Army," however, isn't just about battles and military strategy, it also describes the character (i.e. socioeconomic background) of the men who comprised the ranks of the Continental Army. It also demonstrates the significance of Washington's leadership to the American military tradition. Overall, Martin and Lender do a fascinating job of fusing military history with modern "social history" in creating a brilliant history of the Continental Army. If you like John Keegan's "Fields of Battle" and PBS's "Civil War," you'll enjoy "A Respectable Army."