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eBook Names on the Land: A Historical Account of Place-Naming in the United States (New York Review Books Classics) ePub

eBook Names on the Land: A Historical Account of Place-Naming in the United States (New York Review Books Classics) ePub

by Matt Weiland,George R. Stewart

  • ISBN: 1590172736
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Matt Weiland,George R. Stewart
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: NYRB Classics; Trade Paperback Edition edition (July 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 432
  • ePub book: 1807 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1348 kb
  • Other: doc mobi docx txt
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 310

Description

A classic work on American place names by George R. Stewart

A classic work on American place names by George R. Stewart. I'm a place-name geek but didn't know about this gem until I read the book recently. First published in 1945 and newly reissued (NYRB Classics) it's a history of the United States told through its place names. Stewart exhaustively surveys our geographic labels, a chaotic but charming blend of anglicized American Indian words (Wisconsin), transplanted place names (Boston), poetic impulse (Martha's Vineyard), twisted foreign phrases (Broadway, from the Dutch Breede Wegh) and salesmanship (Frostproof, Fla).

Names on the Land book. This beloved classic about place-naming in the United States was. 1590172736 (ISBN13: 9781590172735).

George R. Stewart, Matt Weiland. George R. Stewart (1895-1980) was born in Pennsylvania and educated at Princeton. Names on the Land will engage anyone who has ever wondered at the curious names scattered across the American map. Stewart’s answer is always a story-one of the countless stories that lie behind the rich and strange diversity of the USA. Результаты поиска по книге. Отзывы - Написать отзыв. in English literature from Columbia University in 1922, and joined the English faculty at the University of California, Berkeley, in 1924.

George R. Stewart’s classic study of place-naming in the United States was . Names on the Land was first published in 1945 and has remained a classic in the field of onomastics-the study of proper names and their. Stewart’s classic study of place-naming in the United States was written during World War II as a tribute to the varied heritage of the nation’s peoples. few authors or books are more American-in every good sense of that word-than George R. Stewart and Names on the Land. Wall Street Journal. Names on the Land was first published in 1945 and has remained a classic in the field of onomastics-the study of proper names and their meanings.

Happy New Year! –The Internet Archive Team. by. Stewart, George Rippey, 1895-. Names, Geographical - United States. Boston : Houghton Mifflin.

On the Russian front, I loved Julie A. Buckler’s Mapping St. Petersburg: Imperial Text and Cityshape

George R. Stewart’s classic study of place-naming in the United States was written . Stewart’s classic study of place-naming in the United States was written during World War II as a tribute to the varied heritage of th. .By George R. Stewart Introduction by Matt Weiland.

George Stewart's Names on the Land was first published in 1944. Names on the Land earns its status as a classic by reading like a compendium of fun facts raised to a Whitmanesque prose poem.

by George Rippey Stewart. More than half a century later, Names on the Land remains the authoritative source on its subject, while Stewart’s intimate knowledge of America and love of anecdote make his book a unique and delightful window on American history and social life. Originally published: New York : Random House, 1945.

George R. Stewart’s classic study of place-naming in the United States was written during World War II as a tribute to the varied heritage of the nation’s peoples. More than half a century later, Names on the Land remains the authoritative source on its subject, while Stewart’s intimate knowledge of America and love of anecdote make his book a unique and delightful window on American history and social life.Names on the Land is a fascinating and fantastically detailed panorama of language in action. Stewart opens with the first European names in what would later be the United States—Ponce de León’s flowery Florída, Cortés’s semi-mythical isle of California, and the red Rio Colorado—before going on to explore New England, New Amsterdam, and New Sweden, the French and the Russian legacies, and the unlikely contributions of everybody from border ruffians to Boston Brahmins. These lively pages examine where and why Indian names were likely to be retained; nineteenth-century fads that gave rise to dozens of Troys and Athens and to suburban Parksides, Brookmonts, and Woodcrest Manors; and deep and enduring mysteries such as why “Arkansas” is Arkansaw, except of course when it isn’t.Names on the Land will engage anyone who has ever wondered at the curious names scattered across the American map. Stewart’s answer is always a story—one of the countless stories that lie behind the rich and strange diversity of the USA.

Comments

Eigeni Eigeni
I learned so much from this book. When I purchased it, I thought it might be like an annotated dictionary of sorts -- perhaps in alphabetical order, so that I could look up Topeka or New York. But it's not like that at all. The author starts with the blank canvas of the American landscape, before recorded history, and describes how a place becomes a name.

The book is arranged chronologically, so the reader moves from pre-history to native Americans to colonists; and from the edges of the country (like Florida, California and New Mexico) to the middle regions; and from colonial governmental debates on names to the Congressional debates on state names in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

The information about the place names comes at the reader not as a dry history lesson, but almost as an epic novel in which the main character is the landscape, and the minor characters are the natives, the immigrants, the politicians, the storytellers. The prose is spare and compelling. The depth of research is mind-boggling.

This is a book to be read, re-read and referred to for the rest of your life, especially if you are a traveller or a proud American.
Tansino Tansino
This is a well-researched, educational, fascinating and engaging book on the stories behind over 2,000 names of states, counties, cities, towns, mountains, rivers, streams, lakes, mining camps, crossroads, and other places in the United States. The book is divided into 46 chapters, presented in chronological order from the earliest European explorations of North America to the admission of Alaska and Hawaii as the 49th and 50th states in 1959. This book is a delightful read for anyone with an interest in word origins, history, geography, travel, and maps.
Diab Diab
Behind every name there's a story and Stewart's tome is a staggering monument of scholarship. One can only imagine the time and resources he put into this book which tells the origin of many of the place names that today are so familiar. And he reveals the naming processes, from adopting Indian appellations to names of explorers, to descriptions of events that took place there, to artificially contrived names, to names that evolved, to names brought from abroad -- in other words, the whole gamut of naming places. Stewart's telling of the story behind so many names adds a new and pleasureable dimension to American history. This is a book you read slowly, savoring the names on the land as they tell their story.
Adokelv Adokelv
just starting with this. quite fascinatin. one of my all time favorites is "measuring America" and this is deals with naming america
Arcanescar Arcanescar
It is always humbling to discover how limited my education is in key areas, especially geography. Names on a map that I have seen dozens of times, cities and towns I have visited but never given deep thought to, and the evolution of language are all present in this slim volume. I found myself surprised that I had read thirty or forty pages without realizing any passage of time. I lost myself in this book -- like exploring familiar territory for the very first time. An engaging, worthwhile, illuminating book.
Anayalore Anayalore
So far I'm only about 1/3 of the way through "Names on the Land," but I'm enthralled. The sub-title, "A Historical Account of Place Naming..." is right on. The book approaches it subject from a historical perspective. The reader travels with the early explorers as they encounter landmarks on their journeys, so one learns about the namers and their times, as well as about the names they left behind them. Based on my reading so far, I can strongly recommend this book.
Morad Morad
What a great book. George R is at his most inspired here. Recommended
Highly readable and appealing, this history is no cutsey look at how places in the US got their names; it's a page-turner of intriguing detail, with appropriate respect for NA Indians. Mr Stewart touches on subjects as varied as the War Between the States, how Oklahoma got its name,the prevalent use of "-burgh' in the eastern sections,and "Noah Webster's spelling book." Find a copy of NAMES ON THE LAND if you have any interest in finding yet another clue as to how the US got to be the way it is today.