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eBook Bay of Spirits: A Love Story (Globe and Mail Best Books) ePub

eBook Bay of Spirits: A Love Story (Globe and Mail Best Books) ePub

by Farley Mowat

  • ISBN: 0771064675
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Farley Mowat
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Emblem Editions (October 13, 2009)
  • Pages: 432
  • ePub book: 1452 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1177 kb
  • Other: doc rtf lit txt
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 399

Description

Farley Mowat came to Newfoundland in the early 1960s and fell in love, both with the land and its people, and with a young artist named Claire Wheeler.

Farley Mowat came to Newfoundland in the early 1960s and fell in love, both with the land and its people, and with a young artist named Claire Wheeler. It's the former that Mowat dwells upon the most in this book, and as a reader I left frustrated because we learn so comparatively little about Claire and about their life together. It takes 1/3 of the book for Mowat to reveal that he was married when he met Claire, and that the the tug of his family - including two sons - delayed his eventual divorce. His former family is dismissed in a paragraph.

Mowat and Claire Wheeler spent the next decade sailing in the rocky bays, thick fogs and sudden squalls of the region. The author of 40 books, mostly on nautical and adventure themes, Mowat has a deep understanding of the sea and the natural world

Mowat and Claire Wheeler spent the next decade sailing in the rocky bays, thick fogs and sudden squalls of the region. The author of 40 books, mostly on nautical and adventure themes, Mowat has a deep understanding of the sea and the natural world. His observations of the outporters are equally perceptive and provide a fascinating window into a little known corner of North America. In this tender elegy to a lost Newfoundland, Mowat shows an amused tolerance for almost everything except the human greed that has inexorably destroyed his adopted home's cultures and environment.

Praise for Farley Mowat: Farley Mowat writes as a good helmsman steers - with easy skill .

Praise for Farley Mowat: Farley Mowat writes as a good helmsman steers - with easy skill, admirable precision, and the authority of a sailor in his element. A master storyteller. Farley Mowat began writing for a living in 1949 after spending two years in the Arctic. Farley Mowat loves the environment and those who knew how to live in it. This tale includes these, as well as describing his childhood of exploration of the wild and its critters. We also learn of his wartime (WW2) experience.

In 1957, Farley Mowat shipped out aboard one of Newfoundland's famous coastal steamers, tramping from outport to. .Farley Mowat writes as a good helmsman steers with easy skill, admirable precision, and the authority of a sailor in his element

In 1957, Farley Mowat shipped out aboard one of Newfoundland's famous coastal steamers, tramping from outport to outport along the southwest coast. The indomitable spirit of the people and the bleak beauty of the landscape would lure him back again and again over the years. In the process of falling in love with a people and a place, Mowat also met the woman who would be the great love of his life. Farley Mowat writes as a good helmsman steers with easy skill, admirable precision, and the authority of a sailor in his element.

Home Farley Mowat Bay of Spirits: A Love Story. It contained countless nooks and crannies well suited to shelter their boats, fishing stages, and houses, so there they planted themselves, always within sailing or rowing distance of the enormously rich coastal fishing grounds. Bay of spirits a love s.Bay of Spirits: A Love Story, . When Newfoundland joined Canada in 1949, more than eighty such outports dotted the Sou’west Coast, the name bestowed on the wall of cliffs and fiords stretching from Port aux Basques in Newfoundland’s southwestern corner to the bottom end of Fortune Bay, more than two hundred miles to the eastward.

Target/Movies, Music & Books/Books/All Book Genres/Biography .

Target/Movies, Music & Books/Books/All Book Genres/Biography & Autobiography‎. Bay of Spirits - (Globe and Mail Best Books) by Farley Mowat (Paperback). In 1957, Farley Mowat shipped out aboard one of Newfoundland's famous coastal steamers, tramping from outport to outport along the southwest coast.

The Lonely Hearts Hotel, by Heather O'Neill (HarperCollins) – A love story, between two talented but star-crossed orphans, set in the seedy underbelly of Montreal in the early 20th century.

Globe and Mail Best Books. McClelland & Stewart.

This is the story of that love affair, of summers spent sailing the Newfoundland coast, and of their decision to start their life together in Burgeo, one of the province’s last remaining outports. It is also an unforgettable portrait of the last of the outport people and a way of life that had survived for centuries but was now passing forever. Affectionate, unsentimental, this is a burnished gem from an undiminished talent. I was inside my vessel painting the cabin when I heard the sounds of a scuffle nearby. Globe and Mail Best Books.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Bay of Spirits: A Love Story as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Bay of Spirits: A Love Story. Farley Mowat began writing for a living in 1949 after spending two years in the Arctic

Bay of Spirits: A Love Story. In the late 1950s, best-selling author Mowat (Never Cry Wolf ) began exploring the southwest coast of Newfoundland and the French overseas communities of St. Pierre and Miquelon, off the Newfoundland. He is the best-selling author of thirty-nine books, including Never Cry Wolf, Owls in the Family, The Dog Who Wouldn’t Be, and The Boat Who Wouldn’t Float. With sales of more than fourteen million copies in twenty-five countries, he is one of Canada’s most successful writers.

In 1957, Farley Mowat shipped out aboard one of Newfoundland’s famous coastal steamers, tramping from outport to outport along the southwest coast. The indomitable spirit of the people and the bleak beauty of the landscape would lure him back again and again over the years. In the process of falling in love with a people and a place, Mowat also met the woman who would be the great love of his life. A stunningly beautiful and talented young artist, Claire Wheeler insouciantly climbed aboard Farley’s beloved but jinxed schooner as it lay on the St. Pierre docks, once again in a cradle for repairs, and changed both their lives forever. This is the story of that love affair, of summers spent sailing the Newfoundland coast, and of their decision to start their life together in Burgeo, one of the province’s last remaining outports. It is also an unforgettable portrait of the last of the outport people and a way of life that had survived for centuries but was now passing forever. Affectionate, unsentimental, this is a burnished gem from an undiminished talent.I was inside my vessel painting the cabin when I heard the sounds of a scuffle nearby. I poked my head out the companionway in time to see a lithesome young woman swarming up the ladder which leaned against Happy Adventure’s flank. Whining expectantly, the shipyard dog was endeavouring to follow this attractive stranger. I could see why. As slim and graceful as a ballet dancer (which, I would later learn, was one of her avocations), she appeared to be wearing a gleaming golden helmet (her own smoothly bobbed head of hair) and was as radiantly lovely as any Saxon goddess. I invited her aboard, while pushing the dog down the ladder.“That’s only Blanche,” I reassured my visitor. “He won’t bite. He’s just, uh . . . being friendly.”“That’s nice to know,” she said sweetly. Then she smiled . . . and I was lost.–From Bay of SpiritsFrom the Hardcover edition.

Comments

Moonshaper Moonshaper
Such an easy & pleasant read. You really can tell how much Farley loves Newfoundland & it's people.
Sha Sha
Classic Mowat! Delves deep and never disappoints.
Samugul Samugul
Farley Mowat writes a moving story about how he met his wife Claire by accident while trying to escape a vicious dog, and, in doing so, also "kills two birds with one stone" by portraying the colorful, insular people of Newfoundland in the 1950's as well as the inhabitants of the almost unheard of French islands of St. Pierre and Miquelon in the North Atlantic off the coast of St. John, NF. I would highly recommend this book to those who enjoy learning about new places and people, and at the same time would want to curl up with a well-written love story.
Aiata Aiata
Exceedingly happy with the condition of this used book by author Farley Mowat. It was a gift for a family member this Christmas who is eagerly consuming all that Mowat has written. This book arrived promptly and in "like new" condition.
Shou Shou
excellent book
Boyn Boyn
SO GOOD HE GETS TO THE REALLY MEAING OF HOW LIKE ISTHANK YOU AWC
Brightfury Brightfury
I had to set aside my feelings about a married man with two young children at home somewhere in Canada cavorting around Newfoundland with a young woman in this sometimes sex and alcohol-fueled story and try to remember not only his message but that Mowat's recent death left us with one less friend of the earth. I read Born Naked recently and it was clear that as a child he was given free rein to do whatever he wanted and also had the example of a serially unfaithful father.

There are hard parts to read and I had to skip over them. I did not read the final chapter as I don't want it in my memory. The rest of the book was enjoyable. The people of this land were so interesting. The book suffers from a virtual lack of maps even though he is constantly talking about places along the coasts that the reader needs to visualize.

No matter what, Farley Mowat did so much for the beings on this earth who have no voice. I liked him immensely.
Farley Mowat's notion of an idyllic day's sail more often than not involves heavy seas in shallow, rocky waters, accompanied by gale force winds, pelting rain and/or pea-soup fog, in a leaky boat with engine issues.

Therefore armchair adventurers will enjoy this memoir of Mowat's 1960s love affair with "a special woman and a special world" as much as romantic sorts looking for travel among the bygone fishing villages of Newfoundland.

Readers familiar with Mowat, however, will know there must be bitter with the sweet. The Newfie fishing communities, fiercely independent and attached to their way of life like limpets to a rock, were in serious decline by the 1960s. The teeming schools of fish had disappeared under the relentless onslaught of the big fishing operations and the government wanted to resettle the fishermen in factory towns, bringing Newfoundland (which had only joined Canada in 1949) squarely into the 20th century.

The book opens with Mowat's harrowing and exhilarating trip aboard a 200-foot coastal steamer, one of six (now gone), which took freight and passengers to the outposts of Newfoundland, their main contact with the world.

"Newfoundland is of the sea. A mighty granite stopper thrust into the mouth of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, its coasts present more than five thousand miles of rocky headlands, bays, capes, and fiords to the sweep of the Atlantic. Everywhere hidden reefs, which are called, with dreadful explicitness, sunkers, wait to rip open the bellies of unwary vessels."

Though Mowat saw little of the coast, due to foul weather and impenetrable fog, he was hooked. He bought a fish-slimed schooner, renamed it Happy Adventure and arranged to have it refitted for cruising.

But, flying in to reclaim his refurbished boat, he makes a dismaying discovery. "My wishes had conflicted with centuries of tradition, which dictated that space allotted to people aboard a boat must be kept to the irreducible minimum so as to leave as much room as possible for fish."

Then, on its maiden voyage the boat sprung a leak, a serious leak. The bilge pump jammed, the fog rolled in, water engulfed the engine and they (Mowat and his friend and longtime publisher, Jack McClelland) luckily ran aground. Next trip out they realized they should have had the compass adjusted while fixing the leak.

It was while working on Happy Adventure that Mowat met Claire Wheeler, a Toronto artist. It was love at first sight, but after several mostly idyllic (including the requisite sprinkle of sudden storms, engine troubles and fog) the pair go their separate ways. Mowat was already married, with two small children, a fact he had previously failed to mention to the reader and which naturally casts a bit of a pall.

Though Mowat makes no excuses, his friends and family - and hers too - seem remarkably enthusiastic about the romance. Either his first marriage was something awful, which does not seem the case, or his memory has reshaped itself. Eventually Mowat tells his wife and goes off with Claire.

They take up residence in Burgeo, Newfoundland, and continue spending summers sailing the coast and meeting its people. While a few communities are insular and suspicious, most are immediately hospitable, inviting the couple into their homes for meals, drink, stories and, when called for, a bed.

Arriving in Francois (Fransway) during a Force 7 gale, he and Claire are taken in by a friend who fed them rabbit soup and roast caribou. Mowat then "learned that it would be necessary for Les to take us to visit every single one of the family connections to show he and Carol weren't trying to hoard us. Visitors had to be shared, just like everything else in an outpost."

The anecdotes and tall tales Mowat collects form an endlessly fascinating portrait of people's work lives, bravery, quirks, superstitions, and customs. These are seamlessly complemented by historical research and interviews, documenting the long and inexorable decline of a proud, hardscrabble way of life. There is regret and sadness, but no self-pity among the Newfies.

Mowat has written more than 40 books, mostly about the people, places, creatures and history of a rapidly disappearing natural world. While this book meanders more than some, his customary passion, humor and eloquence draw the reader into his world.

But it's a world in which he remains an outsider. He is reminded of this from time to time, but the senseless killing of a lone whale (documented in "A Whale for the Killing") stranded in a nearby lake, ends the book and the Mowats' happy sojourn in Burgeo. Though many disapproved of the louts who slaughtered the whale for sport, more disapproved of Mowats' actions in bringing the press down upon them.

A postscript lists other Mowat Newfoundland books, including "This Rock Within the Sea" "Sea of Slaughter," and "The Farfarers." "The Boat Who Wouldn't Float" describes his restoration of the Happy Adventure.