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eBook Lafayette of the South: Prince Camille de Polignac and the American Civil War (Williams-Ford Texas AM University Military History Series) ePub

eBook Lafayette of the South: Prince Camille de Polignac and the American Civil War (Williams-Ford Texas AM University Military History Series) ePub

by Jeff Kinard

  • ISBN: 1585441031
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Jeff Kinard
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Texas A&M University Press; 1st edition (February 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 248
  • ePub book: 1318 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1921 kb
  • Other: docx lrf doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 776

Description

Lafayette of the South book. Texas A & M University Military History Series .

Lafayette of the South book. The remarkable Confederate career of Prince Camille de Polignac-French aristocrat, professional military man, and soldier of fortune-has gone largely unnoticed because most of his service occurred in the relatively neglected western theater of the American Civil war. While in Louisiana in early 1863, after serving under Gen. .

William Arceneaux, Jeff Kinard. Published: 1 November 2002. in The Journal of Southern History. The Journal of Southern History, Volume 68; doi:10. Keywords: Lafayette, Polignac, civil war, Prince Camille, American Civil. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

The remarkable Confederate career of Prince Camille de Polignac-French aristocrat, professional military man, and solider of fortune-has gone largely unnoticed because most of his service occurred in the relatively neglected western theater of the American Civil war.

Texas declared its secession from the Union on February 1, 1861, and joined the Confederate States on March 2, 1861, after it replaced its governor, Sam Houston, when he refused to take an oath of allegiance to the Confederacy. As with those of other States, the Declaration was not recognized by the United States government at Washington.

Lafayette of the South: Prince Camille de Polignac and the American Civil War. College Station: Texas A & M. College Station: Texas A & M University Press, 2001.

Lafayette of the South by Jeff Kinard, 2001, Texas A&M University . April 6, 2014 History. Prince Camille de Polignac and the American Civil War. 1st ed. by Jeff Kinard

April 6, 2014 History. Lafayette of the South. by Jeff Kinard. Published 2001 by Texas A&M University Press in College Station.

For three years during the American Civil War an oddly assorted brigade of Texans served the Confederacy in the . Series: Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series (Book 60). Paperback: 104 pages.

For three years during the American Civil War an oddly assorted brigade of Texans served the Confederacy in the Trans-Mississippi theater and then. Publisher: Texas A&M University Press (March 1, 1998).

Williams-Ford Texas A&M University Military History Series. Polignac dies in1913, holding the peculiar distinction of being the last Confederate major general and the only foreign national on either side to earn a rank. The remarkable Confederate career of Prince Camille de Polignac†French aristocrat, professional military man, and solider of fortune-has gone largely unnoticed because most of his service occurred in the relatively neglected western theater of the American Civil war. Sponsored High Speed Downloads.

The remarkable Confederate career of Prince Camille de Polignac—French aristocrat, professional military man, and solider of fortune-has gone largely unnoticed because most of his service occurred in the relatively neglected western theater of the American Civil war.While in Louisiana in early 1863, after serving under Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard and Gen. Braxton Bragg, newly promoted Brigadier General Polignac took over a brigade of unruly Texans. In many ways it was a last chance for both Polignac and the brigade. Lieutenant General Richard Taylor, disgusted with the insubordinate Texans, was on the verge of breaking up the brigade. Polignac despite an impeccable military background, had been rejected by a number of units because of his foreign birth.Through hard work and personal bravery. The French prince eventually won his men’s trust and played a crucial role in defeating the Red River campaign of Union general Nathaniel P. Banks, for which Polignac was promoted to major general. In early 1865 Polignac made a final attempt to save his adopted country by sailing to France on a secret diplomatic mission, but by the time he arrived in Paris, the South had surrendered.In the engaging, well-written Lafayette of the South, Jeff Kinard reveals the distinguished but underappreciated life and career of Prince Camille de Polignac. With riveting storytelling, Kinard follows Polignac through his early days, his dramatic years during the Civil War and the Franco-Prussian War, and the rest of his long life. Polignac dies in1913, holding the peculiar distinction of being the last Confederate major general and the only foreign national on either side to earn a rank.

Comments

wanderpool wanderpool
Excellent, well documented and entertaining read, with the exception of one passage in which the author becomes confused and seems to buy into revisionist history that the war was fought to free slaves. How simplistic! He refers to the high standards of the southern soldier with the exception to the cause they were fighting for...slavery. Any one who truly researches the political climate and opinions of the south at the time and in fact the north also, well understands how wrong that opinion is. However, as long as he sticks to the military aspects of the war, it is an excellent book.
Wild Python Wild Python
One of my favorite characters from the Civil War era is the Confederate general who was a French Prince, Camille de Polignac. Polignac served primarily in the trans-Mississippi department, so he's relatively obscure. For Civil War buffs, however, the story of the "Polecat" (as his soldiers called him; it's Texan for "skunk") and his tempestuous relationship with the Texans he commanded is one of the minor legends of the Civil War. This book fills in the blanks, rounding out the story of Polignac and how he became a general in the Confederate army.

Jeff Kinard is a good historian, and he keeps the narrative of Polignac's life going pretty well. Though the book is relatively short (about 180 pages of text) the author presents a considerable amount of information about Polignac that I didn't know prior to reading the book. For instance, he was French and raised in France, but he already spoke English when he arrived, because his mother was English. As the Civil War started, Polignac swiftly made friends with P.G.T. Beauregard, and also Judah P. Benjamin. Both men were from Louisiana, but since Benjamin was aligned with Confederate President Jefferson Davis, who in turn hated Beauregard, Polignac had to navigate pretty dangerous waters to avoid insulting the one man or the other, while maintaining friendly relations with both.

Appointed Lieutenant Colonel in the Confederate service, Polignac spent about two years languishing mostly in staff positions. He once commanded a regiment in a single small battle, but was immediately after transferred back to staff duties. He chafed at the desk work and eventually wrangled for himself a promotion to Brigadier General, and an appointment to the Trans-Mississippi department, where he would be assigned a command. After some hesitation, he was appointed commander of a brigade of Texans by General Richard Taylor, the commander of the local forces. Under Taylor's command, Polignac's brigade fought through the Red River campaign, fighting three pretty harsh battles with Union General Nathaniel Banks' forces, and Admiral David D. Porter's gunboat fleet. In the first of these battles, Polignac's division commander, Alfred Mouton, was killed, and Polignac replaced him. He led the division in the next two battles, and for some time after.

In early 1865 Polignac was sent to France by his department commander, General E. Kirby Smith. The mission was futile, and the Confederacy surrendered before he could return. He never set foot in America again, though he lived a long life. He also served with distinction in the Franco-Prussian War, his forces remaining together long after most of the rest of the French army had disintegrated.

I really enjoyed this book, and I found this book quite interesting, informative, and entertaining. Highly recommended for Civil War buffs.
Gold Crown Gold Crown
Jeff Kinard stretched very little material into a weak biography of just 187 pages of hardback text. De Polignac wasn't much more than a curious footnote in the history of the Civil War.