cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Satan's Circus: Murder, Vice, Police Corruption, and New York's Trial of the Century
eBook Satan's Circus: Murder, Vice, Police Corruption, and New York's Trial of the Century ePub

eBook Satan's Circus: Murder, Vice, Police Corruption, and New York's Trial of the Century ePub

by Mike Dash

  • ISBN: 1400054710
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Mike Dash
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Crown; First Edition edition (June 12, 2007)
  • Pages: 449
  • ePub book: 1779 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1265 kb
  • Other: lrf lit mbr mobi
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 306

Description

Corruption is rampant in New York City because of the influence of Tammany Hall, and if anyone wants to move up in a career in law enforcement, they have to play the game.

Corruption is rampant in New York City because of the influence of Tammany Hall, and if anyone wants to move up in a career in law enforcement, they have to play the game. In that vein, it is hard to look down on Becker, who is no more corrupt than anybody else and is pretty much thrust into a world where graft is the norm, not the exception.

Mike Dash is the New York Times bestselling author of Tulipomania and Batavia’s Graveyard. He read history at the University of Cambridge and worked for some years as a magazine publisher before becoming a full-time writer. 2 people found this helpful.

Читает Robertson Dean. Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. Скачайте Google Play Аудиокниги сегодня!

of the major challenges confronting the United States and the world. A New Biology for the 21st Century.

If you want to become full, let yourself be empty. of the major challenges confronting the United States and the world. Systems Thinking, : Managing Chaos and Complexity: A Platform for Designing Business Architecture. He has tested these concepts with 200. Materials for High Temperature Power Generation and Process Plant Applications.

com User, August 14, 2007.

ABRIDGED AUDIO BOOK: 6 hours on 5 CDs. Charles Becker, a handsome young German-American boy, grew up in poverty in the small village of Callicoon Center, New York in the late 1800s.

They called it Satan's Circus-a square mile of Midtown Manhattan where vice ruled, sin flourished, and depravity danced in every doorway. At the turn of the 20th century, murder was so common there that few people were surprised when the loudmouthed owner of a shabby casino was gunned down on the steps of its best hotel.

The city was "a morass of corruption" controlled by powerful local "bosses" who gave most of the New York Police Department their jobs. Into this poisonous atmosphere stepped young Charles Becker. In 1894, after a stint as a saloon bouncer, "Handsome Charley" ("broad-shouldered, barrel-chested, with fists like typewriters") joined the NYPD.

They called it Satan’s Circus—a square mile of Midtown Manhattan where vice ruled, sin flourished, and depravity danced in every doorway. At the turn of the twentieth century, it was a place where everyone from the chorus girls to the beat cops was on the take and where bad boys became wicked men; a place where an upstanding young policeman such as Charley Becker could become the crookedest cop who ever stood behind a shield. Murder was so common in the vice district that few people were surprised when the loudmouthed owner of a shabby casino was gunned down on the steps of its best hotel. But when, two weeks later, an ambitious district attorney charged Becker with ordering the murder, even the denizens of Satan’s Circus were surprised. The handsome lieutenant was a decorated hero, the renowned leader of New York’s vice-busting Special Squad. Was he a bad cop leading a double life, or a pawn felled by the sinister rogues who ran Manhattan’s underworld? With appearances by the legendary and the notorious—including Big Tim Sullivan, the election-rigging vice lord of Tammany Hall; future president Theodore Roosevelt; beloved gangster Jack Zelig; and the newly famous author Stephen Crane—Satan’s Circus brings to life an almost-forgotten Gotham. Chronicling Charley Becker’s rise and fall, the book tells of the raucous, gaudy, and utterly corrupt city that made him, and recounts not one but two sensational murder trials that landed him in the electric chair.

Comments

Xal Xal
As of late, I have been on a reading binge that focuses on New York City in late 19th and early 20th centuries. Thai Jones' "More Powerful Than Dynamite" stands out as, indeed, the most powerful, but Mike Dash's "Satan's Circus: Murder, Vice, Police Corruption, and New York's Trial of the Century" came in second by only a neck.

While I am used to reading about the courtroom shenanigans that go on these days (and while I am also tired of seeing books that have "[fill in the blank] of the Century" in the title), the Satanic circus presented in Dash's lively prose is jaw-dropping. If you don't know anything about the Rosenthal/Becker case, be prepared for a wild ride of police and judicial abuse that will stun you.

The book is wisely divided into two sections: the murder of the annoying big-shot-gambler-wannabe, Herman Rosenthal, and the trial of the bullying, "grafting" Lieutenant Charles Becker for the crime. Each section is populated by colorful characters with colorful names, each moving in their own orbits around Herman Rosenthal, Lt. Becker, Tammany Hall, the immigrant population, and the neighborhood known as Satan's Circus (a/k/a, "The Tenderloin"). A good deal of referenced material surrounds each of these. The footnotes and the notes section themselves contain anecdotes and histories that round out and polish up everything. This meticulous dedication to the background of people and events may be off-putting to some but I found it admirable and responsible, especially when the legal wrangling kicks in.

The overall effects are sadness and infuriating frustration for the defendant. No, Becker was not the nicest of guys and, perhaps, he really did have something to do with Rosenthal's assassination. And, yet, the evidence is just too shaky. The dubious criminals who implicated Becker, the ambitious and zealous D.A. Charles Whitman and the cop-hating judges (Goff, more than Seabury) bent the truth and the rules ever so much to guarantee Becker's conviction. More than that, however, it seemed everything conspired to send Becker to an early grave. Tammany's slow demise, the death of Big Tim Sullivan, the promotion of DA Whitman to Governor Whitman... all seemed to push Becker along to the hot seat. His long-suffering wife, Helen, is also victim to all this, although she is not as innocent as she wanted to seem. In fact, no one is innocent. ALMOST everyone deserves the fate dealt them. Some should have suffered but didn't. Others were dragged down in the whirlpool.

Enough. I don't want to give away more than I may have already. But, wow, there is so much more that I have hardly touched upon. If you want to read more about what truly earned the title of "Trial of the Century", Dash's book is the place.
Dyni Dyni
In this book the reader is introduced to the seamy side of New York City life at the turn of the 20th century, and how the police force at that time was intimately connected with the many types of vice in the city. There were payoffs and rigged arrests, and also murders, for this was serious business to those folks.

The book eventually concerns itself with a police lieutenant named Charlie Becker, who is accused of murder (the author doesn't believe he was involved) and after two trials was eventually executed in the electric chair at Sing Sing. Around this tale the author weaves a story of such corruption that it seems almost unbelieveable, and yet it happened.

It's fascinating to read about how "the system" operated back then, and how the police, and the vice lords, interacted to see that vice was left alone for the most part, and many police, particularly the higher ranks, made an extreme amount of money for the time, and eventually retired to a life of near luxury. Perhaps they were not so different from many happenings today, except that its not as well reported as it was then, when many newspapers in New York fought out circulation wars by trying to "dig up the dirt" first, and thus sell more papers than the competition.Read this book. I feel sure that you will enjoy it as much as I did.
Usaxma Usaxma
Author Mike Dash has provided us with a thorough description of the corruption and vice in New York City, specifically the Times Square area (Satan's Circus) at the turn of the 20th century. Lieutenant Charley Becker's effort to cover up his graft by eliminating gambler Herman Rosenthal, who planned on blowing the whistle on Becker's crookedness, is covered in great detail. The characters in this book are many with the personality of each given in great detail. Prosecutor Charles Whitman went all out to convict Becker while hoping to advance his own political career. His goal to achieve the presidency of the United States was not achieved, but he did become the two time governor of New York. Ironically he was the one who Becker had to appeal to for a pardon from the then governor Whitman. Judge John Goff, all full of himself and drunk with the power of his position, went out of his way to favor the prosecution in Becker's trial. Becker's case was appealed and he received a new trial, but was convicted once again mainly on the basis of a conference a witness heard at a Harlem Conference regarding the case. Four shady characters with nicknames such as Lefty Louie, Whitey, Dago Frank, and Gyp the Blood, were Rosenthal's actual assassins while others such as gamblers Bald Jack Rose and Jack Zelig made the necessary arrangements. This is a story of the murder of Herman Rosenthal, the corruption of the New York police department, and the trial that sent a police lieutenant and the four hired hands to the electric chair in Sing Sing prison. A definite plus of the book is the inclusion of maps of Manhattan in the front to show the location of key events in the story. I am rating this book five stars, but it does have one definite drawback. There are seven photos and one drawing at the front of the book of key players in the story. Photos of the actual murderers and other key individuals should have been included as well. Another book on this subject entitled "The Execution of Officer Becker" by Stanley Cohen included photos of the murderers, the Tombs jail in lower Manhattan, the Bridge of Sighs, and other photos showing New York City during this time period. Both of these books on this subject should find a permanent place in your library.