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eBook The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama ePub

eBook The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama ePub

by Gwen Ifill

  • ISBN: 0767928903
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Gwen Ifill
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Anchor; First Edition edition (October 27, 2009)
  • Pages: 320
  • ePub book: 1772 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1831 kb
  • Other: doc lrf azw rtf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 893

Description

Listen to unlimited audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Drawing on interviews with power brokers like Obama, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, Vernon Jordan, the Reverend Jesse Jackson, and many others, as well as her own razor-sharp observations and analysis, Ifill shows why now is a pivotal moment in American history. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Gwen Ifill - Politics and Race in the Age of Obama - 04/16/09. 6 years ago6 years ago. Speech.

Gwen Ifill profiles the rising generation of black politicians, whose reach extends beyond their base. What role did race play in the presidential election of 2008, and what does it augur for the future of American politics? That is the question Gwen Ifill addresses in The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama, among the first in an avalanche of studies of the new president.

The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama (Hardcover) by Gwen Ifill (Author). Doesn't Ifill make a lot more money if Obama is President when her book is released in January?

The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama (Hardcover) by Gwen Ifill (Author). To be released January 20, 2009. Doesn't Ifill make a lot more money if Obama is President when her book is released in January? 2 following.

In Breakthrough, the author presents a series of extended vignettes

Except, of course, that these days everything is about Obama. In Breakthrough, the author presents a series of extended vignettes. She writes at some length about Barack Obama, but she gives considerable attention to a new cadre of Black leaders including Newark NJ mayor Cory Booker, Alabama congressional representative Artur David and Massachusetts governor Deval Patrick.

In The Breakthrough, veteran journalist Gwen Ifill surveys the American political landscape, shedding new light . An excellent work of written art that provides a serious perspective about politics and race in the 21st Century.

In The Breakthrough, veteran journalist Gwen Ifill surveys the American political landscape, shedding new light on the impact of Barack Obama’s stunning. I would recommend this as a "required reading" for all minorities, regardless of their ethnic origin, who are interested in pursuing a leadership and/or political career. The Breakthrough is a remarkable look at contemporary politics and an essential foundation for understanding the future of American democracy in the age of Obama.

In The Breakthrough, veteran journalist Gwen Ifill surveys the American political landscape, shedding new light on the impact of Barack Obama's stunning presidential victory and introducing the emerging young African American politicians forging a bold new path to political power. Ifill argues that the Black political structure formed during the Civil Rights movement is giving way to a generation of men and women who are the direct beneficiaries of the struggles of the 1960s.

Irrespective of their different approaches to, and framing of, the presidential election, both Balz/Johnson and Ifill provide those critical elements scholars writing in a variety of qualitative traditions seek to provide most: thick description, context, perspective, insight, and ultimately a sense of meaning about the phenomenon being investigated.

Ifill's book The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama was published on January 20, 2009, the .

Ifill's book The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama was published on January 20, 2009, the Inauguration Day of President Barack Obama. The book focused on several African-American politicians, including Obama and other up-and-comers such as Artur Davis (then a member of Congress), Deval Patrick (then the governor of Massachusetts.

The Breakthrough book. Your book addresses race in politics in a truthful and engaging way. I am, however, left with many questions. While so smart, she was also savvy about people. How would you have covered Kamala Harris as current .

In The Breakthrough, veteran journalist Gwen Ifill surveys the American political landscape, shedding new light on the impact of Barack Obama’s stunning presidential victory and introducing the emerging young African American politicians forging a bold new path to political power. Ifill argues that the Black political structure formed during the Civil Rights movement is giving way to a generation of men and women who are the direct beneficiaries of the struggles of the 1960s. She offers incisive, detailed profiles of such prominent leaders as Newark Mayor Cory Booker, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, and U.S. Congressman Artur Davis of Alabama (all interviewed for this book), and also covers numerous up-and-coming figures from across the nation. Drawing on exclusive interviews with power brokers such as President Obama, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, Vernon Jordan, the Reverend Jesse Jackson, his son Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr., and many others, as well as her own razor-sharp observations and analysis of such issues as generational conflict, the race/ gender clash, and the "black enough" conundrum, Ifill shows why this is a pivotal moment in American history. The Breakthrough is a remarkable look at contemporary politics and an essential foundation for understanding the future of American democracy in the age of Obama.

Comments

Chuynopana Chuynopana
It has been one year since Gwen Ifill died. I decided to read her book and compare it to what is happening today.

The book is about race relations. Ifill provides a brief history of race relations in this country. Then from the civil rights movement to 2009, she reveals the increase in Blacks entering public office. She provides a brief biography of current Blacks running for or who have been elected to office from Obama, Devel Patrick to Cory Booker. She shows how people like Shirley Chisham led the way. Ifill also discusses the state and city level black politicians. I enjoyed her section about Kamala Harris. She was the District Attorney of San Francisco in 2009 when Ifill interviewed her. She then became the California State Attorney General and then State Senator. Ifill could spot talent ready to move upward.

The book is well written and researched. The main issue of the book is more relevant today than in 2009. I can just hear what Ifill would say about today’s treatment of journalist. I still miss seeing her on the PBSNewshour.

I read this on my Kindle app for my iPad. The book is 288 pages. The book was published by Anchor on January 20, 2009.
DART-SKRIMER DART-SKRIMER
All the anger the right had over this book being bias to president Obama would have been laid to rest had they just read it, I did and I walked away with a whole different understanding. Was on a plane reading this book looking around seated next to me all the black businessmen and women, times have changed. Gwen Ifill makes a real good point in writing this book. She talks about the different rites of passage blacks are taking to get into politics. Back in the day she talks about how black leadership made their bones fighting against the system through marches, the church, NAACP. But this new black leadership isnt fighting against them, they are becoming them. This new black leadership like Michael Steele who was at one time the highest ranking republican in the republican party says in the book black people are no longer asking to sit at the lunch counter because thats out dated, we dont sit a lunch counters anymore, he said todays black leadership are more concerned with owning the lunch counter. I agree with that. The breakthrough I get from reading this book is not only new and younger black leadership getting accepted into politics but also their thinking and ideas. Polls were taken asking white people would they vote for a black to be in a political position and many back then said no, now the percentage saying yes is much higher. They proved it by electing President Obama. I think this book makes a good point about why they are breaking through. This new group of black leadership broke through not by marching, not by joining organizations like NAACP, Black Panther, they are not picketing, instead they are being elected, they are being embraced by white people like the harold fords, the corey bookers, our president, president Obama. No this book isnt just about Obama, its about the rise of other blacks just like him instead of kicking down the door to get in, they are being elected in and I think that was worth writing about. Write on, write on Gwen Ifill.
Weiehan Weiehan
By now Gwen Ifill's book is eight years old, and therefore necessarily "behind the times" politically, inasmuch as Obama has completed two terms as President, and many other African American candidates have run for office and more have won than forty years ago. It was informative to read the views of well-known civil rights activists of the 1970's and 1980's, as well as of the current generation of African American politicians, who are reaching a much broader voter base, of whites and Latinos, as well as African Americans, than in past decades, in order to win elections.

On the other hand, Ifill's book involves so many quotes from so many figures, one after the other, that her key points do not always stand out as clearly as they could. I found the individual chapters on Corey Booker and Deval Patrick more readable and interesting. Ifill's Afterword is modest if amusing proof that we have not yet advanced to a post-racial period of our history, but that Obama's (and others') victories have at least allowed Whites to begin broaching questions about race and racism and talking about them.
Rleillin Rleillin
I purchased this book with excitement. I have always loved Gwen Ifill on PBS on Friday night TV. The week I received the book in the mail, Gwen died. I was shocked. There was no hint of her being sick. Consequently, the book was more dear to me. I read the book immediately and was disappointed. It was written as a reporter and sadly, not from Gwen's beautiful heart. Even still, I loved that she wrote it and it will be a treasured book on my bookshelf. She was a great reporter and always told it like it was. She was honest and a woman of great integrity and a credit to her race and profession. I will miss her.
Ynonno Ynonno
Gwen was the quinecential journalist...much respected and trusted by ordinary citizens to discern and deliver the news of the day. She was especially loved and respected by African-American citizens
Modred Modred
A fabulous romp through the movers and shakers of the black political movement. It is so awesome to read about the black leaders of the Civil Rights movement and the newcomers who are appealing to all today. Gwen writes with all her followers in mind - she is bright and interesting. A must read for politicos and black history buffs all.
Auau Auau
excellent , really enjoying this personal but informative book on" backroom" view of WASHINGTON,D.C.
I never missed "Washington Week" with Gwen Ifill. The book was very enlightening.