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eBook Captors and Captives: The 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield (Native Americans of the Northeast) ePub

eBook Captors and Captives: The 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield (Native Americans of the Northeast) ePub

by Evan Haefeli

  • ISBN: 1558495037
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Evan Haefeli
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Massachusetts Press; New edition edition (August 24, 2005)
  • Pages: 400
  • ePub book: 1561 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1959 kb
  • Other: doc mbr rtf mobi
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 942

Description

Like most scholars and readers of colonial history, Evan Haefeli and Kevin Sweeney are aware that . Native men and women. The book builds on and carries further the work. particular memory of the Deerfield massacre. was. preserved and shaped in New England.

Like most scholars and readers of colonial history, Evan Haefeli and Kevin Sweeney are aware that the. Deerfield "massacre" has already received a great deal.

Электронная книга "Captors and Captives: The 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield", Evan Haefeli, Kevin Sweeney. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Captors and Captives: The 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Captors and Captives book. The raid and its aftermath is reported from the perspectives of the French, Native American, and English who were involved

Captors and Captives book. The raid and its aftermath is reported from the perspectives of the French, Native American, and English who were involved.

Evan Haefeli, Kevin Sweeney. Anyone hoping to understand the raid should begin by reading this book. Captors and Captives: The 1704 French and Indian Raid on Deerfield. Native Americans of the Northeast: Culture, History, and the Contemporary Series. The breadth and specificity of their findings-they are able to identify the home villages of most of the native attackers, for example, and trace the careers of many of the captives-is startling.

Any collection strong in Native American or early American history should make Captors And Captives: The 1704 French And Indian Raid On Deerfield a collection acquisition: explores the raid from different viewpoints of the raiders, both French-Canadian and Native American.

Any collection strong in Native American or early American history should make Captors And Captives: The 1704 French And Indian Raid On Deerfield a collection acquisition: explores the raid from different viewpoints of the raiders, both French-Canadian and Native American, and the Deerfield villages alike, showing the confrontational and friendly relationships between diverse groups of the times. In using the individual experience to provide history and social and cultural insights, Captors And Captives provides an outstanding social coverage. The most in depth study of the 1704 raid to date. AS THE northwesternmost town of New England, Deerfield, Massachusetts, found itself in 1704 at the forefront of a clash of peoples and empires in northeastern North America. Captors And Captives: The 1704 French And Indian Raid on Deerfield (Na.

Book Description: This volume draws together an unusually rich body of original sources that tell the story of the 1704 French and Indian attack on Deerfield, Massachusetts, from different vantage points.

Series: Native Americans of the Northeast. Published by: University of Massachusetts Press. Book Description: This volume draws together an unusually rich body of original sources that tell the story of the 1704 French and Indian attack on Deerfield, Massachusetts, from different vantage points. Texts range from one of the most famous early American captivity narratives, John Williams’s The Redeemed Captive, to the records of French soldiers and clerics, to littleknown Abenaki and Mohawk stories of the raid that emerged out of their communities’ oral traditions.

org This content downloaded from 12. 20. 218 on Thu, 20 Feb 2014 22:50:05 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions This content downloaded from 12.

The 1704 Raid on Deerfield (also known as the Deerfield Massacre) occurred during Queen Anne's War on February 29 when French and Native American forces under the command of Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville attacked the English frontier settleme.

The 1704 Raid on Deerfield (also known as the Deerfield Massacre) occurred during Queen Anne's War on February 29 when French and Native American forces under the command of Jean-Baptiste Hertel de Rouville attacked the English frontier settlement at Deerfield, Massachusetts, just before dawn. They burned part of the town and killed 47 villagers. The raiders left with 112 settlers as captives, whom they took overland the nearly 300 miles to Montreal.

Journal of British Studies. Recommend this journal. Journal of British Studies.

The definitive account of a pivotal episode in colonial American history

On February 29, 1704, a party of French and Indian raiders descended on the Massachusetts village of Deerfield, killing fifty residents and capturing more than a hundred others. In this masterful work of history, Evan Haefeli and Kevin Sweeney reexamine the Deerfield attack and place it within a framework stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Great Lakes. Drawing on previously untapped sources, they show how the assault grew out of the aspirations of New England family farmers, the ambitions of Canadian colonists, the calculations of French officials, the fears of Abenaki warriors, and the grief of Mohawk women as they all struggled to survive the ongoing confrontation of empires and cultures.

Haefeli and Sweeney reconstruct events from multiple points of view, through the stories of a variety of individuals involved. These stories begin in the Native, French, and English communities of the colonial Northeast, then converge in the February 29 raid, as a force of more than two hundred Frenchmen, Abenakis, Hurons, Kahnawake Mohawks, Pennacooks, and Iroquois of the Mountain overran the northwesternmost village of the New England frontier. Although the inhabitants put up more of a fight than earlier accounts of the so-called Deerfield Massacre have suggested, the attackers took 112 men, women, and children captive. The book follows the raiders and their prisoners on the harsh three-hundred-mile trek back to Canada and into French and Native communities. Along the way the authors examine how captives and captors negotiated cultural boundaries and responded to the claims of competing faiths and empires—all against a backdrop of continuing warfare.

By giving equal weight to all participants, Haefeli and Sweeney range across the fields of social, political, literary, religious, and military history, and reveal connections between cultures and histories usually seen as separate.

Comments

Clever Clever
This book provides good background details on the motives of people from all sides who were involved in the 1704 Deerfield raid. Those factual details and explanations make it possible for the reader to imagine and almost feel what it must have been like for the people involved, Indian and French, as well as English colonials. Haefeli and Sweeney do a good job of covering the complexity of interaction between the multiple cultures that led to the events and aftermath of the raid. There's a map to illustrate the locations of the houses within and without the village palisades. The book also includes reference charts to give the reader a comparative summary at a glance of the captives and what happened to them and the material damages and losses to the village. I'm a descendant of a few Deerfield residents from that period (John Sheldon, Sr.; his son, Ebenezer; the Stebbins family, through Sheldon's wife, Hannah Stebbins Sheldon; and the Hinsdales and Wrights through intermarriage with Ebenezer's descendants in later generations), so this story has interested me ever since I first encountered it in genealogy research. I'd already read Captors and Captives from our local library, but purchased it in order to have my own copy for reference.
Samut Samut
It was a very good book. I was interested in it as I am related to one of the families that got massacred and or kidnaped to Canada. Found it very informative and the seller whom I purchased it from was very fast and easy to deal with. Smooth transaction.
Nilador Nilador
Tons of history. Still reading. There is so much information, it's hard to follow, but very, very good book. Would reccommend to anyone.
Dagdage Dagdage
Good story with tons of info.
Gamba Gamba
Detailed, well written and really worthwhile if you live close enough to visit and view what is told. Great for a history buff!!!
Gavidor Gavidor
I bought this book looking for more information about one of my possible relatives who may have been captured. There was not much information beyond what I could find on the Internet, however. Despite this, the book appears to be well done, and describes a section of history that is for the most part unknown.
Tetaian Tetaian
*****
This book offers a neutral account of what circumstances led up to the attack, the attack itself, and post-attack events.