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eBook Prisoners of the Home Front: German POWs and Enemy Aliens in Southern Quebec, 1940-46 (Studies in Canadian Military History) ePub

eBook Prisoners of the Home Front: German POWs and Enemy Aliens in Southern Quebec, 1940-46 (Studies in Canadian Military History) ePub

by Auger

  • ISBN: 0774812230
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Auger
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: UBC Press (December 9, 2005)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1615 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1999 kb
  • Other: mbr docx doc rtf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 197

Description

Prisoners on the Home Front sheds some much needed light on an. .

Prisoners on the Home Front sheds some much needed light on an under-represented topic in Second World War historiography. This book has forged a new path for the study of Canadian internment camps during the Second World War. (. Canadian Military History, Spring -03-01). In the middle of the most destructive conflict in human history, almost 40,000 Germans civilians and prisoners of war were detained in internment and work camps across Canada. Five internment camps were located on the southern shores of the St. Lawrence River in the province of Quebec: at Farnham, Grande Ligne, Île-aux-Noix, Sherbrooke, and Sorel.

Martin Auger shows how internment imposed psychological and physical strain in the form of restricted mobility, sexual .

Martin Auger shows how internment imposed psychological and physical strain in the form of restricted mobility, sexual deprivation, social alienation, and lack of physical comfort. In response, Canadian authorities introduced labour projects and education programs to uphold morale, thwart internal turmoil, and prevent escapes. Lawrence River in the province of Quebec: at Farnham, Grande Ligne, le-aux-Noix, Sherbrooke, and Sorel.

The history of Canadian internment operations in World War II, both . In the following chapters, which form the core of the book, Auger attempts to reconstruct the social history of the camps.

Auger's focus is on five internment camps located in southern Quebec: Île-aux-Noix, Farnham, Sherbrooke, Grande Ligne, and Sorel.

Start by marking Prisoners of the Home Front: German . Martin Auger's book provides a fascinating insight into the internment operation in southern Quebec.

Start by marking Prisoners of the Home Front: German POWs and "enemy Aliens" in Southern Quebec, 1940-46 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. In the midst of the most destructive conflict in human history, almost 40,000 Germans were detained in twenty-five permanent internment camps and dozens of smaller work camps located across Canada.

Cet ouvrage d'histoire militaire est tire d'un memoire de maitrise depose en 2000 a l'Universite d'Ottawa sous un titre similaire: Prisoners of the home front: A social study of the German internment camps of Southern Quebec, 1940-1946

Cet ouvrage d'histoire militaire est tire d'un memoire de maitrise depose en 2000 a l'Universite d'Ottawa sous un titre similaire: Prisoners of the home front: A social study of the German internment camps of Southern Quebec, 1940-1946. Episode relativement peu connu de l'histoire de la Deuxieme guerre mondiale, le Canada avait etabli des camps militaires pour interner des prisonniers de guerre allemands captures en Europe par l'armee britannique: pour la plupart des soldats et des espions.

Электронная книга "Prisoners of the Home Front: German POWs and "Enemy Aliens" in Southern Quebec, 1940-46", Martin F. Auger. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Prisoners of the Home Front: German POWs and "Enemy Aliens" in Southern Quebec, 1940-46" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

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In the middle of the most destructive conflict in human history, the Second World War, almost 40,000 Germans civilians and prisoners of war were detained in internment and work camps across Canada

In the middle of the most destructive conflict in human history, the Second World War, almost 40,000 Germans civilians and prisoners of war were detained in internment and work camps across Canada. Prisoners of the Home Front details the organization and day-to-day affairs of these internment camps and reveals the experience of their inmates.

The item Prisoners of the home front : German POWs and "enemy aliens" in southern Quebec, 1940-46, Martin F. Auger represents a specific, individual, material embodiment of a distinct intellectual or artistic creation found in Vancouver Public Library. Data Citation of the Item Prisoners of the home front : German POWs and "enemy aliens" in southern Quebec, 1940-46, Martin F. Copy and paste the following RDF/HTML data fragment to cite this resource.

Little is known of the internment of German prisoners of war, civilians and merchant seamen on Canadian soil during the Second World War. In the midst of the most destructive conflict in human history, almost 40,000 Germans were detained in twenty-five permanent internment camps and dozens of smaller work camps located across Canada. Five of these permanent camps were located on the southern shores of the St. Lawrence River at Farnham, Grande Ligne, Ile-aux-Noix, Sherbrooke, and Sorel in the province of Quebec.Martin Auger’s book provides a fascinating insight into the internment operation in southern Quebec. The study examines the organization and day-to-day affairs of internment camps, and offers an in-depth analysis of the experience of the German prisoners who inhabited these camps. The author shows how the pressures of internment, such as restricted mobility, sexual deprivation, social alienation, and the lack of material comfort created important psychological and physical strains on inmates. In response, Canadian authorities introduced labour projects and educational programs to uphold morale, to thwart internal turmoil, and to prevent escapes. These initiatives also aimed to expose German prisoners to the values of a democratic society and prepare their postwar reintegration. The author concludes that Canada abided with the provisions of the Geneva Convention, and that its treatment of German prisoners was humane.Prisoners of the Home Front sheds light on life behind Canadian barbed wire. The study fills an important void in our knowledge of the Canadian home front during the Second World War and furthers our understanding of the human experience in times of war.