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eBook Heart Like Water: Surviving Katrina and Life in Its Disaster Zone ePub

eBook Heart Like Water: Surviving Katrina and Life in Its Disaster Zone ePub

by Joshua Clark

  • ISBN: 1416537635
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Joshua Clark
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Free Press (July 10, 2007)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1347 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1463 kb
  • Other: azw lrf docx rtf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 597

Description

Joshua Clark never left New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, choosing instead to band together with fellow . With lyrical sympathy, humility, and humor, Heart Like Water marks an astonishing and important national debut

Joshua Clark never left New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, choosing instead to band together with fellow holdouts in the French Quarter, pooling resources and volunteering energy in an effort to save the city they loved. With lyrical sympathy, humility, and humor, Heart Like Water marks an astonishing and important national debut. A portion of the author's royalties from this book will go to the Katrina Arts Relief and Emergency Support (KARES) fund, which supports New Orleans-area writers affected by the storm. com to find out how to make a direct and positive impact on the region.

"Heart Like Water" gives us not only a first-person history of a horrific time, but all the . Joshua Clark stuck it out in New Orleans during Katrina and the ensuing flood and serves up Apocalypse stew, which doesn't go down easy.

"Heart Like Water" gives us not only a first-person history of a horrific time, but all the chaos and absurdity of that time. Clark has produced something that is not only entertaining, but an important document explaining how people adjust and survive. John Barry, author of "The Great Influenza" and "Rising Tide". Heart Like Water" is street reporting at its rawest and most revealing

Joshua Clark never left New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, choosing instead to band together with fellow holdouts in the French Quarter, pooling resources and volunteering energy in an effort to save the city they loved

Joshua Clark never left New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, choosing instead to band together with fellow holdouts in the French Quarter, pooling resources and volunteering energy in an effort to save the city they loved.

Heart Like Water book. Joshua Clark never left New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, choosing instead to band together with fellow holdouts in the French Quarter, pooling resources and volunteering energy in an effort to save the city they loved.

Joshua Clark's HEART LIKE WATER is powerful, poignant, touching and amazing unlike any other book I've read about surviving a disaster

Joshua Clark's HEART LIKE WATER is powerful, poignant, touching and amazing unlike any other book I've read about surviving a disaster.

Joshua Clark never left New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, choosing instead to band together with fellow holdouts in the French Quarter, pooling resources and volunteering energy in an effort to save the city they loved.

Writer, publisher, and man-about-town Joshua Clark defied the mandatory evacuation that preceded the 2005 storm and hunkered down in his French Quarter apartment with his girlfriend and a radio. Everyone has heard about the astoundingly un-American failure of the state and federal governments to respond to Hurricane Katrina, and subsequently Rita, in New Orleans. You know the basic story: Somehow officials couldn’t get people out or supplies in quickly enough. Armed bands of civilians took to the streets. Martial law, rotting garbage and bodies, the ice trucks never made it. But if you want.

Joshua Clark never left New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, choosing instead to band together with fellow . Read on the Scribd mobile app.

Hurricane Katrina-What Really Happened by Nathaniel Jones Heart Like Water: Surviving Katrina and Life in Its Disaster Zone by Joshua Clark.

Hurricane Katrina-What Really Happened by Nathaniel Jones. Life in the Wake: Fiction from Post-Katrina New Orleans by the writers of NOLAFugees. City of Refuge by Tom Piazza. Rooftop Diva: A Novel of Triumph After Katrina by D. T. Pollard. Heart Like Water: Surviving Katrina and Life in Its Disaster Zone by Joshua Clark.

Try it. Right now. Picture the lights going off in the room you're sitting in. The computer, the air conditioning, phones, everything. Then the people, every last person in your building, on the street outside, the entire neighborhood, vanished. With them go all noises: chitchat, coughs, cars, and that wordless, almost impalpable hum of a city. And animals: no dogs, no birds, not even a cricket's legs rubbing together, not even a smell. Now bump it up to 95 degrees. Turn your radio on and listen to 80 percent of your city drowning. You're almost there. Only twenty-eight days to go. Joshua Clark never left New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, choosing instead to band together with fellow holdouts in the French Quarter, pooling resources and volunteering energy in an effort to save the city they loved. When Katrina hit, Clark, a key correspondent for National Public Radio during the storm, immediately began to record hundreds of hours of conversations with its victims, not only in the city but throughout the Gulf: the devastated poor and rich alike; rescue workers from around the country; reporters; local characters who could exist nowhere else but New Orleans; politicians; the woman Clark loved, in a relationship ravaged by the storm. Their voices resound throughout this memoir of a unique and little-known moment of anarchy and chaos, of heartbreaking kindness and incomprehensible anguish, of mercy and madness as only America could deliver it. Paying homage to the emotional power of Joan Didion, the journalistic authority of Norman Mailer, and the gonzo irreverence of Tom Wolfe, Joshua Clark takes us through the experiences of loss and renewal, resilience and hope, in a city unlike any other. With lyrical sympathy, humility, and humor, Heart Like Water marks an astonishing and important national debut. A portion of the author's royalties from this book will go to the Katrina Arts Relief and Emergency Support (KARES) fund, which supports New Orleans-area writers affected by the storm.Visit www.NewOrleansLiteraryInstitute.com to find out how to make a direct and positive impact on the region.

Comments

Thomand Thomand
This book is honestly my favorite of all time. It made me laugh, cry and think, think really hard! So many reviews are bases upon the drinking, well, let's see YOU go through 2 hurricanes and not need a little twist on sobriety. I love the style of writing, it places you were the author is.. a definite eye opener to times highly ignored by President Bush but not the newscasters. How scary it is to know that all these people were in the throes of a disaster and not being helped or told what to expect. I am a born and raised Milwaukee gal, and while drinking may have come to the attention more so of people in other states, maybe it is that I live in the most drinking-est state of all that it didn't bother me, I rather understand it and didn't think it was a 'frat-boy, silver spoon & spoiled' author writing this, but rather someone who dealt with it the best he could. I read, on average 2-3 books a week and this one, I've read it once a year since it came out. I just purchased it on Kindle for easier reading than my hardcover. People need not criticize how Joshua Clark spent his time in Katrina, but rather where blame belongs, the people who's very jobs are to keep Americans safe and not heavily ignored by the very same people, not being deployed in the right areas or in a timely manner. While it may not be their fault indirectly, but Bush didn't do what should have been done, WHEN it should have been done.
I love this book. It amazes me that it's all true, and yet, truth is stranger than fiction, so one must believe it all.
Celore Celore
I really hadn't planned to relive this horrific nightmare but since I finally moved 1300 mi away I figured it would be interesting to hear about someone who stayed. Of course, Mr Clark is insane...in a good way...But since he was a writer I knew his story would be better than just a memoir. Thanks for the details on breaches and locations of all else. Closure at last...I think.
Burking Burking
At first, the book seemed to be a bit chaotic but I kept reading and found it fascinating. It's a real story of survival amidst chaos and insanity inflicted on regular people by a federal government that messed up something awful. It's real and emotional and makes perfect sense that strong people survived to tell a amazing story. Great story.
kinder kinder
I wanted to write this when I finished reading. It is not a "quick read". Joshua has put his soul into this work. I am from New England and the entire theme is foreign to me. I bought this as someone who knows someone from NOLA. It wouldn't have mattered, the true story carries itself, you need not have any connection to that lovely, historic city to be absorbed and not want to put it down. The book is so special, each chapter, every word for all to read and to recommend.
Foxanayn Foxanayn
Being from New Orleans and choosing to evacuate. I was able to see through Mr. Clakrs eyes how theing were "behind the cameras". I was impressed in the way he told of others and the ruins they're lives were in. All with being in his own hell and remembering to keep a record of it.
Winotterin Winotterin
Unique. Beautiful. Told by someone who refused to leave
Zulkigis Zulkigis
Never finished the book.
Having visited New Orleans several times, both before and after Katrina, and having the opportunity to
meet Joshua Clark, I dedicate August of every year as a period of rereading this book. I find that with each
reading I have a more intimate relationship with this fascinating city. Clark's composition is pure genius and
draws me in to a point where the fragrances and odors, dangers and delights, thrills and spills seem like first-hand
experiences. If you want to know what it was like -- outlasting a major hurricane in one of America's oldest cities --
you must read this book. It will stand, like the fabled city, for a very long time as the quintessential Katrina chronicle.
Clark should be exalted as a great teller of a uniquely American story, a true literally genius who took the scattered remains
of lives and a city and performed a seemingly impossible task of composing a story that that leaves nothing out.