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eBook Globalizing L.A.: Trade, Infrastructure, and Regional Development ePub

eBook Globalizing L.A.: Trade, Infrastructure, and Regional Development ePub

by Steven Erie

  • ISBN: 0804746818
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Steven Erie
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (February 24, 2004)
  • Pages: 330
  • ePub book: 1407 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1234 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf docx txt
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 474

Description

Steven Erie is Director of the Urban Studies and Planning Program and Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego.

Steven Erie is Director of the Urban Studies and Planning Program and Professor of Political Science at the University of California, San Diego. His first book, Rainbow's End: Irish Americans and the Dilemmas of Urban Machine Politics (UC Press, 1998) received the American Sociological Association's Robert Park Award for the best book in urban sociology and the American Political Science Association's award for the best book in urban politics.

Start by marking Globalizing . Trade, Infrastructure, and Regional Development as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Keywords: Erie, Globalizing ., infrastructure, Regional Development, Steven, trade.

Erie asserts that the advantages of transportation infrastructure faded from theory as intellectual properties and the internet exploded in the 1990s. Erie takes great issue with assertions that Los Angeles is a trade underachiever. However, Los Angeles serves as Erie’s primary example of the importance in the more prosaic aspects of urban history/policy. Far from it, its merchandise trade, heavy import activity, position as the chief hub for . waterbourne commerce, and America’s leading Pacific Rim Gateway serve as LA’s Howard Roark (that doesn’t really apply but this is what it is).

Globalizing L. A. : Trade, Infrastructure, and Regional Development.

Luis R. Fraga and others published Globalizing . Trade, Infrastructure, and Regional Development

Trade, Infrastructure, and Regional Development. Globalization, trade, and interdependence.

Erie has built a potent political-economy of urban development that recognizes the crucial role of the public sector in. .His previous books include Globalizing .

Erie has built a potent political-economy of urban development that recognizes the crucial role of the public sector in mediating globalizing processes. and this is a valuable lesson for academics, dockworkers, community developers, and environmental activists alike. Trade, Infrastructure, and Regional Development (Stanford University Press, 2004) and Rainbow's End: Irish Americans and the Dilemmas of Urban Machine Politics (1990).

Trade, Infrastructure, and Regional Development at Walmart. Until the 1990s, the book argues, . behaved much like a city-state where powerful, semi-autonomous development bureaucracies and entrepreneurial leaders provided the farsighted strategic planning that made these infrastructure projects possible.

" he argues that physical infrastructure development was a catalytic yet underappreciated factor in the transformation of .

com's Steven P. Erie Page and shop for all Steven P. Erie books. Trade, Infrastructure, and Regional Development. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Steven P. Erie.

How do city-regions successfully compete in the global age? Mixing history and policy analysis, Steven Erie offers a compelling account of the improbable rise of Los Angeles, explaining how a region with no natural harbor and a metropolis situated a distant 20 miles from the coast managed to become the world's ninth largest economy and a leading trade and transportation center. In Globalizing L.A., he argues that physical infrastructure development was a catalytic yet underappreciated factor in the transformation of L.A. and Southern California into a global economy, provocatively challenging the conventional wisdom that emphasizes information flows, intellectual property rights, or social capital. The book also highlights the unheralded role of local political institutions and public entrepreneurs in shaping the region's development, growth, and globalization.

Comments

Nettale Nettale
Globalizing L.A. is an interesting journey of our air, rail, and port gateways. It is part urban history, part political journalism, and a portrait of where we are now and our future path. L.A. County covers an immense area, mixed in with various urban centers and sprawled out suburbs. Interspersed among these communities lies the network infrastructure that feeds the regional economy as well as the nation. The book is about this network and the catalyst it provides in trade and developmental growth.

Erie lays out the historical foundations of SoCal's global gateway by first describing a key legislative act in the California constitution, the local home rule. This allowed local governments to institute city charters and the authoritative powers that came with it. Thus the political journey begins and to this day has not stopped. From EIRs, money-hungry mayors, and strategies that can be almost described as espionage, the author spares hardly no subject related to L.A.'s air, rail, and port developments (LAX, Alameda Corridor, and Los Angeles/Long Beach Ports). For example, LAX growth is not only affected by the local communities and the political engine of its home city, but the opposition of commercial airport development at the now defunct El Toro MCAS site in Orange County. Using statistics and reports from various government/public agencies like SCAG (Southern California Association of Governments) and LAWA (Los Angeles World Airports) to name a few, Erie paints the state of economy and trends that reflect the developmental actions within the region. The journey ends in the last chapter ("Rethinking Global Los Angeles") as the author ponders into the new century in a post 9/11 society. Security, changing demographics, and a constrained trade environment are some of the topics that finish his story.

This paperback was published in 2004 and since then, many developments have materialized that still give profound relevance in reading this book today. The expansion of LAX TBIT (Tom Bradley International Terminal), continued efforts to complete ACE (Alameda Corridor East) projects, and the implementation of electrical sources of power for Port ship tankers while docked (to avoid running diesel-operated auxiliary power units) are some of the things one can truly appreciate after reading Steven Erie's book. His detailed knowledge from research and clear points through facts without strong political overtones makes this reading material engaging and educational. In addition, with the L.A. Metro Light Rail expanding around a growing downtown L.A., anyone interested in Los Angeles urbanization and its affect on regional growth should definitely add this book to his/her library.
Ausstan Ausstan
The one thing that our San Diego city fathers haven't a clue about has to do with infrastructure.
Now, before I lose you because infrastructure is not a known attention getter, here's the punchline. Read Steve Erie's new book, "Globalizing L.A." (and San Diego), published by Stanford University Press.
Steve Erie is a professor of political science and director of the Urban Studies and Planning program at UCSD. He is fun and sparkling to listen to, with a wonderful mind to match his immense knowledge. He appeared at D.G. Wills Books in La Jolla.
Erie also leads SD Civic Solutions committee studying infrastructure, a most boring word until a pothole appears in your street to poke your wheels out of alignment. Yet infrastructure is the foundation for all else that any city or neighborhood requires to function at all.
The strangest part of civilization is that any otherwise "normal" voter could find the word boring; boring until you've read Erie's words and his verbal comment and wit on the subject.
He tells us that Los Angeles was second to San Diego until the former began understanding the need for expansive airport, harbor, freeways, bridges and you name it, while America's sleepiest city, San Diego, had added hundreds of thousands of people to its environs.
San Diego has population but forgot foundation. So much of its "foundation" is clichÈ like "best weather" (it is), "America's finest city" (self-anointed to thumb its nose at a Republican Convention that had insulted us), and of course, "laid back."
As a person who moved to L.A. in its good old days, sunshine and winter warmth were the only infrastructure I needed, until the freeways became parking lots and I looked for someone to blame, not having read Pogo yet.
Professor Erie warns that to be a lasting global place, it isn't enough to have the world's third busiest port system and fourth busiest airport. Erie brings out leadership as a compelling reason for L.A.'s progress, including Mayor Tom Bradley's marvelously astute and trusted leadership. When I was a young leader there, I worked with Tom Bradley and some of the great entrepreneurs whose love of place was high above their own vanities.
However, past evidence is celebrated, these are new times, with new issues. As Orange and San Diego counties have evidenced, there is a split between some of the population who believe that new jobs mean more traffic and those who feel that more jobs allow their families to progress and survive.
"It's the economy, stupid," has been replaced with more, "it's the plants, endangered species, canyons, animals and waterfront which must be protected more than the human specie; in addition, the role of traffic as a deal killer, whether it be auto or airplane, and now the threat and fear of terror.
Erie explains that our needs for precious infrastructure is severely underfunded which threatens competitiveness. We are bush-league in much of our planning and funding while China becomes a new global power with its massive expenditures on infrastructure.
Erie criticizes the "Latte Index" which equates progress with how many Starbucks and big boxes are in an area. The so-called "creative class" is synonymous with Silicon Valley and our intellectual achievement.
There are the "boring" erector set ingredients that can't earn a buzz from them as long as the coffee is imported and fresh. The oil companies learned that people will pay anything to please their cars; they learned this from how much people will pay for a cup of java sprinkled with sugar and heavy cream.
By emphasizing the role as catalyst that public capital investments plays, and how vital infrastructure is in shaping the future of a community, Erie seeks to reshape contemporary policy debates concerning key competitiveness and success. This book adds invaluably to knowledge of regional governance and development, foretelling which places will become smart cities and which will be future ghost towns.