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eBook The Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity (Diálogos Series) ePub

eBook The Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity (Diálogos Series) ePub

by Linda A. Curcio-Nagy

  • ISBN: 082633167X
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Linda A. Curcio-Nagy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of New Mexico Press (May 30, 2004)
  • Pages: 232
  • ePub book: 1886 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1695 kb
  • Other: txt mbr lit azw
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 917

Description

Linda A. Curcio-Nagy. The pervasiveness of festivals and the power of the political message associated with them created possibilities for individuals to assess and participate in a larger discussion of good governance in the colony.

Linda A. This innovative work of cultural history examines the function of public rituals in colonial Mexico City. For most of the colonial period, inhabitants could witness as many as 100 religious and civil celebrations in a year.

The pervasiveness of festivals and the power of the political message associated with them created possibilities for . Linda A. Curcio-Nagy, a leading scholar in the new cultural history of Latin America, is professor of history at the University of Nevada, Reno.

The pervasiveness of festivals and the power of the political message associated with them created possibilities for individuals to assess and participate in a larger discussion of good governance in the colony. Библиографические данные. The Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity Dialogos (University of New Mexico) Diálogos (Albuquerque, .

Volume 61, Issue 4 (Franciscan Influence in Colonial Latin America). April 2005, pp. 713-714. The Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity. By Linda Curcio-Nagy. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2004. Pp. 222. Illustrations.

What a great work of history! This book was honestly like a breath of fresh air. I read so many histories, and this one really stood out . The Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity (Diálogos Series). I read so many histories, and this one really stood out to me. The author weaves a complex and engaging story through the various narratives, and ends up painting a very interesting picture of colonial society in Quito. This book is one of the better histories I have read in the last several years, and I have read many.

This innovative work of cultural history examines the function of public rituals in colonial Mexico City. The largest of these events, both civil and religious, were sponsored by the authorities and were crucial means to embody political and social concepts.

Mexico City Public Space Corporal Punishment City Council Garbage .

Mexico City Public Space Corporal Punishment City Council Garbage Collection. These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. It is important to note here the valuable work done by Linda Curcio-Nagy on the Catholic Church and the function of public rituals in colonial Mexico City. See Curcio-Nagy, The Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity (Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2004).

Mexican National Identity adds immensely to contemporary scholarship on nineteenth-century Latin America, not just Mexico. -Linda Curcio-Nagy, author of The Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity. Beezley's approach is unique, even daring. It offers a mature analysis of Mexican popular culture and will stand as a benchmark for scholars working in the field for years to come.

The great festivals of colonial Mexico City : performing power and identity. For most of the colonia. More).

Linda Curcio-Nagy began learning Spanish in the fourth grade and has been studying, traveling, working and living in. .Curcio-Nagy is currently finishing a book manuscript entitled Grave Sins of Sensuality in Colonial Mexico.

Linda Curcio-Nagy began learning Spanish in the fourth grade and has been studying, traveling, working and living in Latin America ever since that time. in International Affairs and Latin American Studies at George Washington University and studied in Spain and Colombia as part of her undergraduate training. degree in Hispanic Literature for which she specialized in Latin American poetry and prose. A new project analyzing masculinity and magic during the 17th century is well under way.

The Great Festivals of Colonial Mexico City: Performing Power and Identity Linda A. Curcio-­Nagy 6 x. Curcio-­Nagy 6 x 9 232 pages, 14 halftones hardcover 978-­0-­8263-­3166-­3. 978-­0-­8263-­3167-­0. Modernizing Minds in El Salvador: Education Reform and the Cold War, 1960-­1980 Héctor Lindo-­Fuentes and Erik Ching 6 x 9 236 pages, 25 halftones, 5 tables paperback 978-­0-­8263-­5081-­7.

This innovative work of cultural history examines the function of public rituals in colonial Mexico City. Festivals were a defining characteristic of life in the capital. For most of the colonial period, inhabitants could witness as many as 100 religious and civil celebrations in a year. The largest of these events, both civil and religious, were sponsored by the authorities and were crucial means to embody political and social concepts.

The first European public rituals were introduced immediately after the conquest of the Aztec capital. Spanish priests seeking to evangelize the native population introduced Catholic festivals, and civil authorities sponsored celebrations designed to glorify the Spanish empire. Spectacle was one tool in an arsenal of colonizing agents, and over time the growing diversity of the population made festival statecraft all the more important, as government-sponsored revelry attempted to promote shared histories and values among diverse and potentially dangerous groups.

Festivals organizers developed a highly sophisticated message embedded within the celebrations that delineated the principles of leadership and the duties of both rulers and vassals. The pervasiveness of festivals and the power of the political message associated with them created possibilities for individuals to assess and participate in a larger discussion of good governance in the colony.