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eBook Monte Verde: a late Pleistocene settlement in Chile, Vol.2, The Archaeological Context and Interpretation ePub

eBook Monte Verde: a late Pleistocene settlement in Chile, Vol.2, The Archaeological Context and Interpretation ePub

by Tom D. Dillehay

  • ISBN: 1560986808
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Tom D. Dillehay
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Smithsonian; 1st edition (May 17, 1997)
  • Pages: 1071
  • ePub book: 1619 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1421 kb
  • Other: rtf mbr lit lrf
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 378

Description

Tom Dillehay's dating of the Monte Verde site in Chile to 12,800 years ago - hundreds of years before the Mackenzie corridor opened the remote possibility of Beringia (dry Bering Sea) migration - seems to have driven a stake into the theory that man first migrated by land to the Americas.

Tom Dillehay's dating of the Monte Verde site in Chile to 12,800 years ago - hundreds of years before the Mackenzie corridor opened the remote possibility of Beringia (dry Bering Sea) migration - seems to have driven a stake into the theory that man first migrated by land to the Americas. Even most of the establishment achaeologists have now come to admit that their doubts about Monte Verde's authenticity were misguided. Even Brian Fagan, who championed Beringia migration in the THE GREAT JOURNEY, has visited the site and called Dillehay's dates "unassailable.

Discovered in the 1970s in a cool, temperate rain forest, the Monte Verde site in Chile has yielded evidence that precedes the widely accepted date - 11,400 years ago - for the earliest human presence in the Americas.

Monte Verde: A Late Pleistocene Settlement in Chile: The Archaeological Context and Interpretation, Vo., The Archaeological Context and Interpretation. Discovered in the 1970s in a cool, temperate rain forest, the Monte Verde site in Chile has yielded evidence that precedes the widely accepted date - 11,400 years ago - for the earliest human presence in the Americas. One set of artifacts conclusively places humans in South America between 12,400 and 12,800 years before the present.

book by Tom D. Dillehay. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

A Late Pleistocene Settlement in Chile. A Late Pleistocene Settlement in Chile. Vol. 1, Palaeoenvironment and Site Context. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC, 1989. Smithsonian Series in Archaeological Inquiry. By Richard E. Morlan. Message Subject (Your Name) has forwarded a page to you from Science.

Reference work entry. Monte Verde is located in south-central Chile. Monte Verde: a late Pleistocene settlement in Chile, volume 2: the archaeological context and interpretation. The site is an open-air campsite on the banks of a small stream, surrounded by sandy knolls, small bogs, and damp forests that have been there since late Pleistocene times. The bog later developed in the stream basin, covering the abandoned site under a layer of peat. Washington (DC): Smithsonian Institute Press. The settlement of the Americas: a new prehistory.

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Dillehay, . Monte Verde: A Late Pleistocene Settlement in Chile, Vol. 2, The Archaeological Context and Interpretation. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1997. Dillehay, T. et a. "Monte Verde Revisited: Reply to Fiedel, Part I," Scientific American Discovering Archaeology, November/December (1999), pp. 12-14. Dillehay, . and J. Rossen, "Integrity and Distributions of Archaeobotanical Collection," pp. 351-382 in T. Dillehay, Monte Verde, A Late Pleistocene Settlement in Chile, Vol.

Monte Verde: A Late Pleistocene Settlement in Chile. 2, The Archaeological Context. Paleoamerican morphology in the context of European and East Asian Late Pleistocene variation: implications for human dispersion into the New World. Smithsonian Institution Press, Washington, DC. New Prehistory of the Settlement of the Americas. Basic Books, New York. American Journal of Physical Anthropology 144, 442–453. Lahaye, . Hernandez, . Boëda, . Felice, . Guidon, . Hoeltz, . Lourdeaux, . et al., 2013. Human occupation in South America by 20,000 BC: the Toca da Tira Peia site, Piauí, Brazil.

and support early cultural connections with northeastern Asian Upper Paleolithic archaeological traditions. 3. T. D. Dillehay, Monte Verde:A Late Pleistocene Settlement in. Chile, vol. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1997)

and support early cultural connections with northeastern Asian Upper Paleolithic archaeological traditions. The Cooper’s Ferry site was initially occupied during a time that predates the opening of an ice-free corridor (≤14,800 cal yr . which supports the hypothesis that initial human migration into the Americas occurred via a Pacific coastal route. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1997). 4. J. M. Adovasio, J. Donahue, R. Stuckenrath, Am.

The Smithsonian Institution has recently published Dillehay's Monte Verde: A Late Pleistocene Settlement in Chile, Vol. 2: The Archaeological . 2: The Archaeological Context and Interpretation (1997) into which he incorporates materials from the 1990 symposium. These 13 published contributions provide an historical context for contemporary discussions and arguments about the theoretical and methodological directions that archaeology as currently practiced in Latin America is taking or should pursue in the future. A second goal of the book is to correct misrepresentations and errors that appear in the so-called "first world" literature about the history of Latin America (p. ix).

"Detailed descriptions of fieldwork, environment, stratigraphy, radiocarbon chronology, research design, organic preservation, wood assemblage, cordage, microtopography, modern plant use, archaeobotanical identifications, lithics, faunal remains, and activity patterning provide the most comprehensive evidence yet assembled in support of human occupation in South America contemporary with the earliest North American sites. Data are combined to infer diet, activities, land use, foraging strategy, medicinal knowledge, and other components of daily life"--Handbook of Latin American Studies, v. 57.http://www.loc.gov/hlas/

Comments

Black_Hawk_Down. Black_Hawk_Down.
Tom Dillehay's dating of the Monte Verde site in Chile to 12,800 years
ago -- hundreds of years before the Mackenzie corridor opened the
remote possibility of Beringia (dry Bering Sea) migration -- seems to
have driven a stake into the theory that man first migrated by land to
the Americas. Even most of the establishment achaeologists have now
come to admit that their doubts about Monte Verde's authenticity were
misguided. Even Brian Fagan, who championed Beringia migration in the
THE GREAT JOURNEY, has visited the site and called Dillehay's dates
"unassailable." In QUEST FOR THE ORIGINS OF THE FIRST
AMERICANS E. James Dixon, once the chief archeologist at the
University of Alaska, states that, while his mission was to prove
older dates for Clovis man in the north, he found progressively
younger dates there, suggesting that American cultures came from the
south. In September of 1999 paleontologist Walter Neves revealed that
an 11,500-year-old skull from central Brazil, "Luzia", has
the round eyes, large nose and pronounced chin characteristic of
Australian aborigines and native Africans. If they came before land
bridge migration was possible how did these people get to the
Americas? Inter-oceanic travel in antiquity was dismissed as
impossible by academics. Adventurer Thor Heyerdahl's voyages
documented in KON-TIKI and RA II proved that raft voyaging on steady
ocean currents was not only possible but was far easier than walking
over thousands of miles of ice-sheets. The academics have continued to
mock Heyerdahl, calling him a "lucky adventurer." However,
evidence of inter-oceanic travel thousands of years before the
proposed founding of civilization in the Near East is building
steadily.
Jediathain Jediathain
Don't plan to take this book to bed with you because it is not light reading (1071 pp). It does represent, however, the best report on a New World archaeological site to come out in a long time. The site provides the best evidence for pre-Clovis occupation and also has the earliest habitation structures in the New World. The 22 chapters and 16 appendices cover everything from microscopic studies of stone tool edge-wear to analysis of seaweed remains. If you are into early man (excuse the gender bias) studies, find a way to buy this book. The publisher only printed 700 copies, so most of them are going to be purchased by libraries