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eBook The Seventh Child: A Lucky Life ePub

eBook The Seventh Child: A Lucky Life ePub

by Freddie Mae Baxter

  • ISBN: 0375406204
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Freddie Mae Baxter
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Knopf; 1st edition (April 20, 1999)
  • Pages: 240
  • ePub book: 1482 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1357 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf txt lrf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 515

Description

Baxter, Freddie Mae, African American women, African Americans, African American women.

Baxter, Freddie Mae, African American women, African Americans, African American women. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Freddie Mae Baxter's "The Seventh Child" is as much a guide to having a meaningful life as it is a personal story. Nonetheless, Baxter's charming recollections indicate a happy life, full of simple pleasures, needs and desires. This is the book to read and remember whenever you think or believe your life has little or no purpose. Life was slower-paced, and no one seemed to want much to be content. Lacking many material possessions, families were closer, and friends were for life. In the '40s, young Freddie Mae moved to New York, hoping for a better life.

The Seventh Child book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. The Seventh Child: A Lucky Life. by. Freddie Mae Baxter

Freddie Mae Baxter’s books. The Seventh Child: A Lucky Life by. Freddie Mae Baxter, Gloria Bley Miller.

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The seventh of eight children, Freddie Mae Baxter was born in 1923 in rural South Carolina. ISBN13:9780375406201.

Freddie Mae Baxter Liane speaks with Freddie Mae Baxter whose book of memoirs has just been published. In "The Seventh Child: A Lucky Life" (Knopf), Baxter, age 75, tells the story of her life growing up poor in a big family in segregated South Carolina and moving to New York City looking for work as a domestic. After reading and sharing it, she's even more of a truly fine lady, now in her 90s. As a great Harlem neighbor, like in "The Seventh Child," she provides deep and cheerful insights on the true meaning of life and living

Interview with Freddie Mae Baxter, author of The Seventh Child: A Lucky Life, memoir of her life as domestic . Shortly after her mother's death, when she was barely 17, Freddie Mae Baxter left her home in rural South Carolina

Shortly after her mother's death, when she was barely 17, Freddie Mae Baxter left her home in rural South Carolina. She settled in Harlem during the final months of the Depression and found work cleaning rich people's houses and taking care of their children. Black, female and uneducated, she was pretty much limited to low-paying, unskilled work.

A date of publication is only given if the book was not published in 1999. July 11, 1999: All Things Considered: Daniel Zwerdling spoke with the author "Waiting to Fly: My Escapades with the Penguins of Antarctica" by Ron Naveen, published by William Morrow & Co. July 12, 1999: Talk of the Nation: "Alexander Hamilton: American" by Richard Brookhiser, published by Free Press.

Told with the irrepressible warmth and humor of a natural-born storyteller, The Seventh Child is the chronicle of a remarkable woman's life, and of three generations of an African-American family.The seventh of eight children, Freddie Mae Baxter was born in 1923 in rural South Carolina. When her father left the family, her mother had to raise the children alone, and Freddie Mae went to work--first picking cotton, then cooking for the white families in town. At seventeen, she decided to go up North in search of new horizons and a better life.Now, in an astonishingly original voice, Freddie Mae shares with us the wisdom of her seventy-five years, and some vivid memories: from her childhood in the South ("Two cents was money in those days. . .") to her life in Harlem, where she played saxophone in an all-girl band ("We just jammed!") and danced at all the hot clubs ("Anyplace that there was music, you could find me").Through the good times, bad times, and the enormous changes she's lived through, Freddie Mae has remained steadfastly optimistic and emotionally generous. The Seventh Child will take its place alongside our strongest memoirs as an unforgettable American original. As Freddie Mae says, "Let me stay here; I'm doing all right just as I am."

Comments

Thorgahuginn Thorgahuginn
Freddie Mae Baxter's "The Seventh Child" is as much a guide to having a meaningful life as it is a personal story. This is the book to read and remember whenever you think or believe your life has little or no purpose. After reading and sharing it, she's even more of a truly fine lady, now in her 90s. As a great Harlem neighbor, like in "The Seventh Child," she provides deep and cheerful insights on the true meaning of life and living. I always hoped to encounter her during this past spring and summer as she strolls on her errands down Malcolm X Boulevard (Lenox Avenue). Anyone that considers themselves to be young, a "hipster", middle-age or older can learn a lot from Ms. Baxter's book. "The Seventh Child" is a literary keeper that could be a good movie as well.
ME ME
Was very disappointed. I expected a read that would touch my soul; after all this writer is a senior and during the times of her childhood life was very hurtful and unfair to those born with black skin. This book had not one story of an unpleasant happening. It is simply not believable that she had a far happier and better life (childhood) than I did.....and I have white skin. It was difficult to finish the book because it was so dry and actually boring. I am 80 year old and have read many books and this is the only book I have read that leaves me with nothing. I gave it away.
Silverbrew Silverbrew
This is great and interesting story. Very easy to read. I'm pleased to have read about this person and her life.
Risinal Risinal
Growing up in 1930s South Carolina, Freddie Mae Baxter was the youngest of eight children in a poor and fatherless family.

Nonetheless, Baxter's charming recollections indicate a happy life, full of simple pleasures, needs and desires. Life was slower-paced, and no one seemed to want much to be content. Lacking many material possessions, families were closer, and friends were for life.

In the '40s, young Freddie Mae moved to New York, hoping for a better life. She ended up spending the next few decades in a succession of domestic jobs, and although she never married, she loved and provided richly for nieces, nephews, and neighborhood children.

In addition to bits and pieces of Baxter's past, this collection of vignettes also offers her thoughts on a variety of subjects, including family relationships, social evils, and her love for music.

This quick, quirky read will leave an impression upon readers for some time to come.
Velellan Velellan
This is the most enjoyable and insightful book I've ever read!! This lady (Miss Baxter) has beaten all of the odds. She has inherent common sense, wit and skill. I admire extremely how she's led her life: being a good daughter, a good person, a natural born leader, mercy tempered with an abundance of common sense, family oriented, etc. I just wish she could live a second life to do all the things that were denied her in her youth and beyond. Miss Baxter is an Exhorter: this is a person who brings sunshine and hope into the lives of everyone she meets. If my life could be a third as full as hers, I would die happy! And I haven't forgotten Miss Gloria Bley Miller! Miss Miller: This looks like a labor of love to me. It is an excellent work. Thank you so much for taking it all down!!!!!!
Мох Мох
I read this book with utter delight. She tells it like it is and hold no punches. She tells of her life and some of her siblings while growing up economically poor but spiritually rich. She suffers the loss of her mother as a teenager and abandoned by her father in youth and still manages to hold on to wonderful values and doesn't make excuses like so many do today. She finds pleasure in the most simple things of life and doesn't demand a $125 dollar pair of Nike's shoes to be happy. If you can read this book do so, and let some of her richness rub off on you.
Tebei Tebei
I loved reading this book through Freddie Mae's eyes. She is an optimistic overcomer and loves deeply-- I can just tell :)
Thanks to Gloria Bley Miller for recognizing the simple, yet poignant story Ms. Baxter had to tell. Ms. Baxter's story is so ordinary it's extraordinary in it's basic core in the black community. My mother, her sisters, and their mother could have written this story. I love the strength and independence of black females and Ms. Baxter provides a beacon that demonstrates the values we all aspire to: truth, light, peace and harmony.