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eBook The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism: The Menorah Association and American Diversity (The Modern Jewish Experience) ePub

eBook The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism: The Menorah Association and American Diversity (The Modern Jewish Experience) ePub

by Daniel Greene

  • ISBN: 0253223342
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Daniel Greene
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press; First Edition (US) First Printing edition (April 15, 2011)
  • Pages: 278
  • ePub book: 1868 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1794 kb
  • Other: lrf azw lit txt
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 535

Description

In his excellent book, The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism. Greene makes visible the Jewish strand of a larger American story, an intervention that will help readers to better understand how and why th. .

In his excellent book, The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism. Daniel Greene tells the story of which spread from Harvard to campuses across the country and became the Intercollegiate Menorah Association in 1913. But beyond that, Greene tells the tale of the birth and development of cultural pluralism, the idea that undergirded the Menorah Association. Greene makes visible the Jewish strand of a larger American story, an intervention that will help readers to better understand how and why the concept of cultural pluralism came about in the way it di.

Daniel Greene’s monograph, The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism, represents an important . In the pages of the IMA’s magazine, The Menorah Journal (first published in 1915), young Jewish intellectuals put forth a vision for the renaissance of Jewish life in America.

Daniel Greene’s monograph, The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism, represents an important contribution to American Jewish historiography. Greene’s volume traces the evolution of cultural pluralism in its appropriate social and cultural context, anchoring a discussion of ideas within the precise historical milieu from which they emerged. Greene asserts that the concept of cultural pluralism largely originated on America’s elite college campuses in the first decade of the twentieth century.

of Cultural Pluralism: The Menorah Association and American Diversity, by Daniel Greene, Indiana University Press, 2011. way to embrace American culture while at the same time preserving a Jewish way of life.

The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism: The Menorah Association and American Diversity, by Daniel Greene, Indiana University Press, 2011. The Journal also published fiction, showcasing the first stories written by such later luminaries as Lionel Trilling, Meyer Levin and Anzia Yezierska. Their stories tended to portray, often through humorous characters, how Jews could reinvent Jewish culture in an American setting.

Daniel Greene traces the emergence of the idea of cultural pluralism to the lived experiences of a group of Jewish college students and public intellectuals, including the philosopher Horace M. Kallen. These young Jews faced particular challenges as they sought to integrate themselves into the American academy and literary world of the early 20th century.

Daniel Greene traces the emergence of the idea of cultural pluralism to the lived experiences of a group of Jewish college . In response to the idea that the American melting pot would erase all cultural differences, the Menorah Association advocated a pluralist America that would accommodate a thriving Jewish culture while bringing Jewishness into mainstream American life.

Daniel Greene, Director of the Scholl Center for American History and Culture at the Newberry Library in Chicago, has .

The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism illuminates our understanding of American-Jewish culture and what we call the American experience. It is a grand study of the IMA's enduring achievements. American Jewish Archives Journal. In his excellent book, The Jewish Origins of Cultural Pluralism.

Recommend this journal.

Daniel Greene traces the emergence of the idea of cultural pluralism to the lived experiences of a group of Jewish college students and public intellectuals, including the philosopher Horace M. Kallen. These young Jews faced particular challenges as they sought to integrate themselves into the American academy and literary world of the early 20th century. At Harvard University, they founded an influential student organization known as the Menorah Association in 1906 and later the Menorah Journal, which became a leading voice of Jewish public opinion in the 1920s. In response to the idea that the American melting pot would erase all cultural differences, the Menorah Association advocated a pluralist America that would accommodate a thriving Jewish culture while bringing Jewishness into mainstream American life.

Comments

Siralune Siralune
The author expertly reviews the pioneering work of Horace Kallen, "The Menorah Journal", and other individuals in the field of appreciating and articulating the substance and value of the diverse cultural, national, and "Peoples" heritages of North America.

My only criticisms are actually "wishes"-- that he had defined his scope more broadly to include (1) "and Later Development" of Cultural Pluralism (occuring in the second half of the 20th Century); and (2)the relationship of this phenomenon to the history of Zionism and within the State of Israel. But that truly
is needed and hopefully will later be brought forth by the author and/or others.
catterpillar catterpillar
The rolof Horace Kallen and numerous other Menorah intellectuals in formulating the foundational discourse and philosophy of cultural pluralism multiculturalism should never be forgotten. See also Elinor Joan Grumet's earlier study _The Menorah Idea and the Apprenticeship of Lionel Trilling_ as well as Stephen Fredman's crucial work titled_A Menorah for Athena: Charles Reznikoff and the Jewish Dilemmas of Objectivist Poetry_