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eBook Ships, Furs, and Sandalwood: A Yankee Trader in Hawaii, 1823-1825 ePub

eBook Ships, Furs, and Sandalwood: A Yankee Trader in Hawaii, 1823-1825 ePub

by Charles H. Hammatt

  • ISBN: 0824822587
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Charles H. Hammatt
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Hawaii Press (August 1, 1999)
  • Pages: 128
  • ePub book: 1130 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1413 kb
  • Other: mobi lrf lrf lrf
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 887

Description

Charles H. Hammatt arrived in Honolulu in 1823 anxious to do business, not to save souls.

Charles H. Young, confident, and ambitious, Hammatt had been entrusted by a mercantile firm in Boston with the delicate task of negotiating trade agreements with Hawaiian royalty to secure sandalwood for the China Trade. Hammatt learned the hard way that the Hawaiians were shrewd negotiators and in firm control of all aspects of trade with foreigners. Readers will delight in this unique view of a Yankee trader and his merchant rivals competing to do business with Hawaiian royalty. Hammatt arrived in Hawaii in 1823 and remained long enough to form his own opinions about native society there. He recorded his encounters and observations in his journal, which provides an unexpected and intimate glimpse of life in frontier Hawaii

Charles H. He recorded his encounters and observations in his journal, which provides an unexpected and intimate glimpse of life in frontier Hawaii. Hammatt, Charles H. - Travel - Hawaii. Hawaii - Commerce - United States. Hawaii - Description and travel. Bryant & Sturgis was one of the leading firms in the sandalwood trade. These Bostonians were happy to sell beads and cloth, both in Hawaii and along the west coast of North America, but after Kamehameha I's death the chiefs wanted western ships more than anything else.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. That overstates the case a little, but Hammatt, a young New Englander about whom little is known, did keep an interesting diary

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Charles H. That overstates the case a little, but Hammatt, a young New Englander about whom little is known, did keep an interesting diary. Hammatt arrived in Honolulu in 1823 anxious to do business, not to. . Hammatt remained in Hawaii long enough to form his own opinions about native society and the odd mix of miscreants and missionaries that populated the largest port in the Pacific.

Book Format: Choose an option. University of Hawaii Press.

Ships, furs and sandalwood: a Yankee trader in Hawai& 1823–1825. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press. The history, present distribution, and abundance of sandalwood on Oahu, Hawaiian Islands: Hawaiian Plant Studies 14. Pacific Sci 1(1):5–20.

Informationen zum Titel Ships, Furs, and Sandalwood von Charles H. Hammatt Charles H.

Charles H. Hammatt arrived in Honolulu in 1823 anxious to do business, not to save souls. Young, confident, and ambitious, Hammatt had been entrusted by a mercantile firm in Boston with the delicate task of negotiating trade agreements with Hawaiian royalty to secure sandalwood for the China Trade. "We have no fears of your falling into any of the vices you will find at the Islands," his employers wrote in their detailed instructions, "but it may be well to reflect on them, to be better prepared to reside in a Society where indolence, intemperance, debauchery, and gambling are so fashionable."

Hammatt remained in Hawai'i long enough to form his own opinions about native society and the odd mix of miscreants and missionaries that populated the largest port in the Pacific. His personal and business dealings brought him into close contact with a wide range of people, from the king, Liholiho (Kamehameha II), and his wary ministers to unscrupulous harbor merchants and sea captains and other "Yankee rogues." From time to time Hammatt also found himself among polite missionary society. He diligently recorded his encounters and observations in his journal, which, published here for the first time, provides an unexpected and intimate glimpse of life in frontier Hawai'i less than half a century after Cook's arrival.

Ultimately, Hammatt proved unsuccessful in his business dealings, and in 1825 his employers ordered him home to Boston. But the account he left of his failed mission is an exciting and colorful addition to previous descriptions from the period. Hammatt learned the hard way that the Hawaiians were shrewd negotiators and in firm control of all aspects of trade with foreigners. Readers will delight in this unique view of a Yankee trader and his merchant rivals competing to do business with Hawaiian royalty.

Comments

ALAN ALAN
Not well-known in the history of Hawai`i. I enjoyed reading it. Greatly surprised.
Naa Naa
Sandra Wagner-Wright, who teaches history at the University of Hawaii-Hilo, discovered Charles Hammatt's journal in the back pages of a Bryant & Sturgis account book at Harvard. She calls it "an exciting addition" to materials on a crucial period in Hawaii, and "a welcome change from (the views of) ubiquitous missionaries . . . laconic traders . . . or ship's officers who did not remain in Hawaii for any length of time."

That overstates the case a little, but Hammatt, a young New Englander about whom little is known, did keep an interesting diary.

Bryant & Sturgis was one of the leading firms in the sandalwood trade. These Bostonians were happy to sell beads and cloth, both in Hawaii and along the west coast of North America, but after Kamehameha I's death the chiefs wanted western ships more than anything else. Bryant & Sturgis had several sloops and brigs it was hopeful of disposing of, plus accounts due for the king's purchase of the famous Cleopatra's Barge, the first millionaire's yacht built in America.

Hammatt, an experienced supercargo who had spent time in India for his employers, was sent out to sell ships and collect sandalwood to pay for them. It was, as Wagner-Wright says, a crucial time in Hawaii.

The chiefs still completely controlled the small haole business community, promising wood but seldom delivering, but tensions were building.

Though Hammatt's notes offer character judgments of the other white traders and officers, unusually, he was not inclined either to praise or to censure the Hawaiians. He arrived when Liholiho was drinking himself to death, and noted the fact, but did not moralize. Nor, unlike the hot-tempered merchant Stephen Reynolds, did he express strong feelings about the missionaries.

He seems, in fact, to have looked about him with wide, fresh eyes. He did not come to conquer Hawaii, or to change it. He accepted its ways without demur, even hiring a "cruise wife."

If there is anything new to history in this slender volume, it is his amused account of how one of the other traders fell in love with one of the famous hapa-haole Holmes sisters and nearly ruined himself trying to persuade her to follow him to sea. This is the most direct account I know of this form of concubinage or prostitution (from the western point of view), which despite the missionaries and the chiefs persisted far in the whaling era.

Hammatt wanted only wood. He realized very soon after arriving that he wasn't going to get it.

Shortly after he left, an American warship arrived to force the chiefs to acknowledge and arranged to pay their debts. That, says Wagner-Wright, was the beginning of the end of Hawaiian sovereignty.

That is one way of looking at it, but her very short analysis is unpersuasive. Following the unreliable PC anthropologist Greg Dening, she argues that the chiefs did not pay wood because they were on a different kind of time from the Americans.

Even if true, that does not explain why the great Kamehameha paid his debts punctiliously. A far more likely explanation of Hammatt's trouble is that the chiefs felt no responsibility to pay, because no one could tell them to do anything.

The complete lack of business ethics on the part of the chiefs resulted in a beggar-thy-neighbor attitude among both chiefs and traders, with the commoners paying most of the penalty, dying in the uplands chopping down the sandalwood.

Hammatt was slow to anger, but after only a few months in Honolulu he was disgusted with the "damned scoundrels here, who are held by no contract & who regard no promises."