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eBook The Dodgers Move West ePub

eBook The Dodgers Move West ePub

by Neil Sullivan

  • ISBN: 0195059220
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Neil Sullivan
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press (June 8, 1989)
  • Pages: 288
  • ePub book: 1199 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1835 kb
  • Other: rtf azw mobi txt
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 422

Description

Clearly expands our understanding of this significant sporting development, and Sullivan should be praised for his courageous attempt to swim against the currents of popular sentiment. -Journal of Sport History.

Clearly expands our understanding of this significant sporting development, and Sullivan should be praised for his courageous attempt to swim against the currents of popular sentiment. has a sure grasp of city politics and a lucid understanding of power struggles. The Dodgers Move West is an excellent book about a black day in baseball.

Neil J. Sullivan's controversial reassessment of a story that has reached almost mythic proportions in its many retellings shifts responsibility for the . A political battle over the Dodgers' move also erupted in Los Angeles. Sullivan's controversial reassessment of a story that has reached almost mythic proportions in its many retellings shifts responsibility for the move onto the local governmental maneuverings that occurred on both sides of the continent. Conventional wisdom has it that Dodgers owner Walter O'Malley cold-heartedly abandoned the devoted Brooklyn fans for the easy money of Los Angeles.

The Dodgers Move West book. Neil J. Sullivan's controversial reassessment of a story that has reached almost mythic proportions in its many retellings shifts responsibility for the move onto the local For many New Yorkers, the removal of the Brooklyn Dodgers - perhaps the most popular baseball team of all time - to Los Angeles in 1957 remains one of the most traumatic events since World War II.

The Dodgers move west. The Dodgers move west. by. Sullivan, Neil . 1948-. Los Angeles Dodgers (Baseball team), Brooklyn Dodgers (Baseball team), Sports and state, Baseball, Baseball. New York : Oxford University Press.

Neil Sullivan's book is an excellent read and highly recommended. The real reasons behind the dodgers move to Los Angeles. Published by Thriftbooks. This book takes you behind the scenes like no other. It's not just O'Malley packing up and leaving. I'll guarantee you at the end of this book, you'll be blown away at the many chances the Dodgers had at actually staying in Brooklyn.

But a telethon campaign that enlisted the help of celebrities like Groucho Marx, George Burns and Ronald Reagan helped to win the referendum in favor of the deal. Sullivan, Neil J. Published by Oxford Univ. Press New York, 1987. From David Kaye Books & Memorabilia (Woodland Hills, CA, .

Sullivan, Neil J. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987

Sullivan, Neil J. New York: Oxford University Press, 1987. Wattenberg, Ben. How the Suburbs Changed America, pb. rg, October 21, 2014.

For many New Yorkers, the removal of the Brooklyn Dodgers--perhaps the most popular baseball team of all time--to Los Angeles in 1957 remains one of the most traumatic events since World War II. Neil J. Sullivan's controversial reassessment of a story that has reached almost mythic proportions in its many retellings shifts responsibility for the move onto the local governmental maneuverings that occurred on both sides of the continent. Conventional wisdom has it that Dodgers owner Walter O'Malley cold-heartedly abandoned the devoted Brooklyn fans for the easy money of Los Angeles. Sullivan argues that O'Malley had, in fact, wanted to stay in Brooklyn, hoping to build a new stadium with his own money. Situated in an increasingly unsafe neighborhood and without parking facilities, Ebbets Field had become obsolete. Yet an uncooperative New York City administration, led by Robert Moses, blocked O'Malley's plan to use the ideal site at the Atlantic Avenue Long Island Railroad terminal. A political battle over the Dodgers' move also erupted in Los Angeles. Mayor Poulson's suggestion to use Chavez Ravine as the new stadium site triggered opposition from residents concerned about a giveaway. Eventually a telethon campaign that enlisted the help of celebrities such as Groucho Marx, George Burns, and Ronald Reagan enabled the approval of the deal. Set against a backdrop of sporting passion and rivalry, and appearing over thirty years after the Dodgers' last season in Brooklyn, this engrossing book offers new insights into the power struggles existing in the nation's two largest cities.

Comments

Kaim Kaim
Over the years I have become rather proficient in Los Angeles Dodger history, specifically when the team moved from Brooklyn.

So, why did the Brooklyn Dodgers move? It’s complicated. O’Malley saw the writing on the wall; if the Dodgers stay at Ebbets Field they will slowly fade into baseball oblivion. The politicians in New York, specifically Robert Moses, were not going to let O’Malley dictate any terms. The politicians had a strict vision for professional baseball, and that vision did not work with O’Malley.

For decades that has been rumors that O’Malley outsmarted and tricked both New York and Los Angeles, but I think the truth is more boring.

O’Malley wanted money and a winning team. O’Malley decided to make his own luck and move the team.

Dodgers Move West is a simple read. It does not bog you down with details or superfluous stories. Just the facts. It’s simple and delightful to read.
Āłł_Ÿøūrš Āłł_Ÿøūrš
Having just installed four 8' tall bobble head statues of various ball players in Dodgers Stadium that my company www.fiberglassfarm.com built I became interested in the "how did the Dodgers get to LA" story. This book does a very good job in many ways, in particular the research is top notch, but fails in some ways. I did not see a credit for editor and the writer could have used a tough hard nosed person to push back and cut large portions while reorganizing and making the flow more readable. I'm a small town Mayor and government activist so I loved the NYC and LA combat to retain and attract the Dodgers but this would not be an easy read for anyone who was not a serious fan of politics or deep, deep inside baseball fandom. Far too much time is spent recounting games and inning by inning results. I learned to skip that though true fans of the era will probably swoon. The layout was particularly difficult to follow and crucial steps often were misplaced in chapters so it was a little hard to know when something critical happened or was happening. Anyway I read it, there's probably nothing like this book in detail of the travails that the Dodgers faced in trying to move into the modern world with far too little help from NYC. O'Malley should probably be in the Hall of Fame for being willing to even consider the move and for managing the successful process laying the groundwork for modern stadiums and team fluidity. If NY and Brooklyn had wanted to keep the Dodgers they could have but they basically forced the move. The anger at the Dodgers was misplaced. Visiting Chavez Canyon is a trip. It's a beautiful park and a visionary place to locate it. Reading the book would help anyone understand so much about how it came to be, and the history of LA and NYC and the business of baseball.
Gaiauaco Gaiauaco
I enjoyed this book because I am old enough to remember when the Dodgers left Brooklyn. This book explains the history of the
Dodgers and the "politics" of both Brooklyn and L.A. that eventually caused the Dodgers to move. I still miss them Bums after all these years!
Invissibale Invissibale
very interesting
Winawel Winawel
It's a good rebuttal to another excellent baseball book the boys of summer
Fordrekelv Fordrekelv
The premise of this book is to deflate the popular theory that Walter O'Malley was the devil and stole the soul of Brooklyn by evilly moving the Dodgers. Sullivan does an excellent job arguing that point and proves it through his research. This point is found as you read through a well written book that chronicles the baseball and economic history of the Dodgers franchise from Brooklyn to L.A. Some of the business and politics sections are a touch hard to read but that can be attributed to an author only being as good as his material. Hard to make inner city council meetings ring with excitement. Overall a solid book and a must own for a fan of the Dodgers and for baseball fans in general.

My Rating: 4.5
in waiting in waiting
I was a sad 10-year-old Brooklyn kid when I learned the dodgers were going to leave us. Like most everyone around, I tended to blame Walter O'Malley's greed. Yet in the end it may have been O'Malley's vanity more than his greed that was most responsible for the fateful decision.

As Neil Sullivan so well points out, a strong case can be made that O'Malley didn't really want to leave at first. If he just wanted to take off, he would not have had the Dodgers play some of their home games in Jersey City. That had to be nothing more than an attempt to get the indifferent New York politicos to take him more seriously. In addition, O'Malley's family roots were all in New York. O'Malley wanted to build a ballpark at the junction of Flatbush and Atlantic Avenues, an ideal location as many subway lines converged there as well as the Long Island Railroad. O'Malley, in other words, believed in public transportation that would make it easy for the average working person to get to the ballpark.

Robert Moses, who blocked O'Malley's path at every opportunity was determined to get the Dodgers out of urban Brooklyn and into what was then semi-suburban Queens. Moses hated the subway system and loved the automobile. It was he who insisted on building the Cross-Bronx Expressway, which tore the heart out of certain neighborhoods in that borough and today is both a bottleneck and an eyesore. Anything to accommodate suburbanites at the expense of the working stiffs. Moses claimeed that putting a ballpark at Flatbush and Atlantic would have caused many thriving businesses to relocate. In fact the Flatbush-Atlantic junction rapidly deteriorated and most of those thriving businesses went under on their own.

The bottom line was that the unelected Parks Commissioner Moses considered himself the czar of all recreation in New York and was not about to let anyone build a ballpark anywhere except where he (Moses) wanted it. In fact what O'Malley proposed was an urban renewal project that was none of the Parks Commissioner's business. But New York's mayor at the time, Robert F. Wagner had the backbone of a jellyfish and was not about to stand up to Moses.

O'Malley, who had invested considerable time and effort on the Flatbush-Atlantic site, finally got tired of being strung along and had no desire to become Moses' tenant and underling in Queens. He saw an opportunity in L.A. and took it. And so today we have ugly Shea Stadium, neo-Stalinist in design, named for a politico, and built under the aegis of Moses, far more unattractive than O'Malley's Dodger Stadium. People can't wait for Shea Stadium to be torn down and replaced by a building with some charm, while O'Malley's beautiful ballpark wil last indefinitely into the future.

Neil Sullivan's book is an excellent read and highly recommended.