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eBook Power And The Public Interest: The Memoirs Of Joseph C. Swidler ePub

eBook Power And The Public Interest: The Memoirs Of Joseph C. Swidler ePub

by Joseph C. Swidler

  • ISBN: 1572331836
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Joseph C. Swidler
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Univ Tennessee Press; 1 edition (June 28, 2002)
  • Pages: 296
  • ePub book: 1518 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1887 kb
  • Other: mobi doc lrf rtf
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 715

Description

Joseph Swidler (1907–1997) was one of the last New Dealers, part of a generation of talented ing Harry Hopkins, Harold Ickes, and Morris Cohen-who devoted their energies to serving public, not private interests.

Joseph Swidler (1907–1997) was one of the last New Dealers, part of a generation of talented ing Harry Hopkins, Harold Ickes, and Morris Cohen-who devoted their energies to serving public, not private interests

Joseph Swidler () was one of the last New Dealers, part of a generation of talented professionals including Harry Hopkins, Harold Ickes, and Morris Cohen who devoted their energies to serving public, not private interests

Joseph Swidler () was one of the last New Dealers, part of a generation of talented professionals including Harry Hopkins, Harold Ickes, and Morris Cohen who devoted their energies to serving public, not private interests.

Swidler, Joseph Charles; Henderson, A. Scott (2002). Power and the Public Interest: The Memoirs of Joseph C. Swidler. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press. p. 243. ^ Finan, Christopher M. (2007). From the Palmer Raids to the Patriot Act: A History of the Fight for Free Speech in America. Boston: Beacon Press. 223. ^ "Harold Cammer Papers".

The authors point out that we are currently involved in a risky, high-stakes game - changing the structure of our electric power industry without proper consideration of the costs and benefits of th. More).

A Federal Court Speaks on Valuation and Rate of Return. The authors point out that we are currently involved in a risky, high-stakes game - changing the structure of our electric power industry without proper consideration of the costs and benefits of th. A different view of'65 blackout. The Allen Institute for Artificial IntelligenceProudly built by AI2 with the help of our.

Power and the Public Interest: The Memoirs of Joseph C. World Heritage Encyclopedia is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization. Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2002.

restoration or increase of the original billion barrel target; reassuring the public on nuclear safety by overdesign of safety precautions and improving licensing procedures; an adequately funded synthetics demonstration program; tightening of automobile fuel-efficiency standards; diversification of sources of oil imports; building excess capacity so that we could acknowledge errors by cleaning up or closing down processes that do not work; involving. by Joseph C. Swidler and A. Scott Henderson. Advocate and Activist: Memoirs of an American Communist Lawyer. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.

Power and the Public Interest . One of the last New Dealers, Joseph Swidler spent twenty-five years with the Tennessee Valley Authority and later chaired the Atomic Energy Commission under President Kennedy. His memoir is filled with insights into a key transitional period in American history and includes anecdotes about such important figures as Lyndon Johnson, David Lilienthal, Nelson Rockefeller, and Harold Ickes. This book will be of interest to students of Tennessee political history as well as scholars of reform in the twentieth-century United States.

Joseph Charles Swidler in The Telegraph-Herald - May 4 1997. OTHER DEATHS By The Associated Press Josoph Swidler WASHINGTON Joseph Swidler, one of the last surviving New Deal. The Telegraph-Herald - May 4 1997. Publication: Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA, USA.

Joseph Swidler (1907–1997) was one of the last New Dealers, part of a generation of talented professionals—including Harry Hopkins, Harold Ickes, and Morris Cohen—who devoted their energies to serving public, not private interests. In a career spanning six decades, he helped craft and administer the nation’s energy policy while witnessing most of the signal events of the modern age: the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and America’s emergence as a superpower. Swidler’s memoir is filled with insights on this transformative period of U.S. history and includes anecdotes about key historical figures, among them David E. Lilienthal, Harold Ickes, Lyndon B. Johnson, John F. Kennedy, and Nelson Rockefeller.In 1933, Swidler, a young Chicago attorney, signed onto the Roosevelt administration’s efforts to implement New Deal economic reforms. As general counsel to the Tennessee Valley Authority, he did much to define the basic parameters of power regulation in the United States. His twenty-five years at the TVA were interrupted by World War II service in the Department of Justice, the War Production Board, and the Navy. Asked by President Kennedy in 1961 to chair the Federal Power Commission (now the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission), Swidler, in just four years, transformed that moribund and inefficient agency into one of the best of the U.S. regulatory commissions. Later, he presided over a similar turnaround during his tenure as Chairman of the New York State Public Service Commission.Between his lengthy stints in government service, Swidler practiced law privately in Nashville and Washington, D.C. But it was as a public servant that he had the most impact, using his sharp intellect and get-it-done style to construct a national energy and utility policy that considered the needs of the consumer as well as those of the producer—a balancing act that is especially relevant in the current climate of energy shortages. The Editor: A. Scott Henderson, assistant professor of education at Furman University, is author of Housing and the Democratic Ideal: The Life and Thought of Charles Abrams.