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eBook Rednecks, Redeemers, and Race: Mississippi after Reconstruction, 1877-1917 (Heritage of Mississippi Series) ePub

eBook Rednecks, Redeemers, and Race: Mississippi after Reconstruction, 1877-1917 (Heritage of Mississippi Series) ePub

by Stephen Cresswell

  • ISBN: 1578068479
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Stephen Cresswell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University Press of Mississippi (March 21, 2006)
  • Pages: 283
  • ePub book: 1899 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1852 kb
  • Other: docx azw lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 456

Description

Rednecks, Redeemers, and Race book. Mississippi saw great change in the four decades after Reconstruction.

Rednecks, Redeemers, and Race book. Rednecks, Redeemers, and Race: Mississippi after Reconstruction, 1877-1917 (Heritage of Mississippi Series). by. Stephen Cresswell. Between 1877 and 1917 the state transformed.

In 1917 as in 1877, Mississippi was a top cotton producer and relied more heavily on cotton . University Press of Mississippi.

In 1917 as in 1877, Mississippi was a top cotton producer and relied more heavily on cotton than on any other product. In 1917 as in 1877 the state had troubled race relations and was all too often the site of lynchings and race riots. Stephen Cresswell is professor of history at West Virginia Wesleyan College and is the author of Multiparty Politics in Mississippi, 1877-1902 (University Press of Mississippi) and Mormons and Cowboys, Moonshiners and Klansmen: Federal Law Enforcement in the South and West, 1870-1893. Heritage of Mississippi.

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Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. My Likeness Taken: Daguerrean Portraits in Americaby Joan L. Severa.

The book, written by West Virginia Wesleyan College professor of history .

Rednecks, Redeemers, and Race: Mississippi after Reconstruction, 1877–1917 is the third volume in the Heritage of Mississippi Series. The period of 1877 to 1917 was a time of tremendous growth and modernization for the state, as it was for the rest of the country. gov or call 601-576-6907.

University of Southern Mississippi. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 01 October 2007.

book by Stephen Cresswell. Farmers diversified their operations, sharply increasing their production of corn, sweet potatoes, and dairy products.

Rednecks, Redeemers, and Race: Mississippi after Reconstruction, 1877-1917 examines the paradox of significant change alongside many unbroken continuities

Rednecks, Redeemers, and Race: Mississippi after Reconstruction, 1877-1917 examines the paradox of significant change alongside many unbroken continuities. Multiparty Politics in Mississippi, 1877-1902.

Because of Reconstruction-era financial problems, Mississippi . The University Press of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi. Stephen E. Cresswell. Rednecks, redeemers, and race: Mississippi after Reconstruction, 1877-1917

Because of Reconstruction-era financial problems, Mississippi Manufacturing Co. was bankrupt by 1871. Captain William Oliver and John T. Hardy bought the mill from Col. Wesson, but it burned in 1873. Rednecks, redeemers, and race: Mississippi after Reconstruction, 1877-1917. a b c Narvell Strickland. In 1917 as in 1877 the state had troubled race relations and was all too often the site of lynchings and race riots

In 1917 as in 1877, Mississippi was a top cotton producer and relied more heavily on cotton than on any other product. Compared with other states in 1917, Mississippi was near the bottom of the list for length of the school year, for percentage of farms that boasted tractors, and for the number of miles of paved or gravel roads. Mississippi was the least urban and most agricultural state in the nation.

Stephen Cresswell is a native of Mississippi and has written several books on Mississippi History. by Stephen Cresswell. For the last 28 years he has taught history at West Virginia Wesleyan College, where he is also the director of the School of Fine Arts and Humanities.

Mississippi saw great change in the four decades after Reconstruction. Between 1877 and 1917 the state transformed. Its cities increased rapidly in size and saw the advent of electric lights, streetcars, and moving pictures. Farmers diversified their operations, sharply increasing their production of corn, sweet potatoes, and dairy products. Mississippians built large textile mills in a number of cities and increased the number of manufacturing workers tenfold.

But many things did not change. In 1917 as in 1877, Mississippi was a top cotton producer and relied more heavily on cotton than on any other product. In 1917 as in 1877 the state had troubled race relations and was all too often the site of lynchings and race riots. Compared with other states in 1917, Mississippi was near the bottom of the list for length of the school year, for percentage of farms that boasted tractors, and for the number of miles of paved or gravel roads. Mississippi was the least urban and most agricultural state in the nation.

Rednecks, Redeemers, and Race: Mississippi after Reconstruction, 1877-1917 examines the paradox of significant change alongside many unbroken continuities. It explores the reasons Mississippi was not more successful in urbanizing, in industrializing, and in reducing its reliance on cotton. The volume closes by looking at events that would move Mississippi closer to the national mainstream.

Stephen Cresswell is professor of history at West Virginia Wesleyan College and is the author of Multiparty Politics in Mississippi, 1877-1902 (University Press of Mississippi) and Mormons and Cowboys, Moonshiners and Klansmen: Federal Law Enforcement in the South and West, 1870-1893.