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eBook Three men in a boat (to say nothing of the dog) ePub

eBook Three men in a boat (to say nothing of the dog) ePub

by Jerome K. 1859-1927 Jerome

  • ISBN: 1177718685
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Jerome K. 1859-1927 Jerome
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Nabu Press (August 26, 2010)
  • Pages: 326
  • ePub book: 1663 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1782 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 306

Description

Читать онлайн - Jerome Jerome Klapka. Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog) Электронная библиотека e-libra. ru Читать онлайн Three Men in a Boat (To Say Nothing of the Dog).

Читать онлайн - Jerome Jerome Klapka. Jerome Jerome Klapka. Three Men in a Boat(To Say Nothing of the Dog) Jerome K. Jerome CHAPTER I Three Invalids. Sufferings of George and Harris. A victim to one hundred and seven fatal maladies. Useful prescriptions. Cure for liver complaint in children. We agree that we are overworked, and need rest. Montmorency lodges an objection

The book was initially.

Three men on the bummel. Jerome K. Jerome I am quite unable to do so. I have writ-ten books that have appeared to me more clever, books that have appeared to me more humorous. To say nothing of the Dog). Originally published in August, 1889, it has been year after year reprinted, until there has been produced the large number of 202,000 copies. I am quite unable to do so. But it is as the author of Three Men in a Boat (to say nothing of the Dog) that the public persists in remembering me.

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Harris said he didn’t think George ought to do anything that would have a tendency to make him sleepier than he always was, as it might be dangerous.

It was just off Southend Pier, I recollect, and he was leaning out through one of the port – holes in a very dangerous position. Harris said he didn’t think George ought to do anything that would have a tendency to make him sleepier than he always was, as it might be dangerous.

Three men in a boat ( to say nothing of the dog ). by jerome k. jerome. The chief beauty of this book lies not so much in its literary style, or in the extent and usefulness of the information it conveys, as inits simple truthfulness

Three men in a boat ( to say nothing of the dog ). Author of "Idle thoughts of an idle fellow," "Stage land," etc. Illustrations by A. Frederics. The chief beauty of this book lies not so much in its literary style, or in the extent and usefulness of the information it conveys, as inits simple truthfulness. Its pages form the record of events thatreally happened. All that has been done is to colour them ; and, for this, no extra charge has been made. George and Harris andMontmorency are not poetic ideals, but things of flesh andblood-especially George, who weighs about twelve stone.

Three Men in a Boat was originally meant to be a serious piece of travel writing, full of local flavors, legends and .

Three Men in a Boat was originally meant to be a serious piece of travel writing, full of local flavors, legends and folklore about England's mighty river. As it turned out, somewhere along the way, the author Jerome found himself catapulted into a madcap adventure. The plot is relatively simple. One of the most delightful examples of Victorian humor, this book by Jerome K Jerome is all the way a fun cruise down the Thames River with some funny characters for company. Three Men in a Boat was originally meant to be a serious piece of travel writing, full of local flavors, legends and folklore about England's mighty river.

Harris said there was nothing like a swim before breakfast to give you an appetite

Harris said there was nothing like a swim before breakfast to give you an appetite. He said it always gave him an appetite. I called for the cheeses, and took them away in a cab. It was a ramshackle affair, dragged along by a knock – kneed, broken – winded somnambulist, which his owner, in a moment of enthusiasm, during conversation, referred to as a horse.

This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. This book may have occasional imperfections such as missing or blurred pages, poor pictures, errant marks, etc. that were either part of the original artifact, or were introduced by the scanning process. We believe this work is culturally important, and despite the imperfections, have elected to bring it back into print as part of our continuing commitment to the preservation of printed works worldwide. We appreciate your understanding of the imperfections in the preservation process, and hope you enjoy this valuable book.

Comments

Rarranere Rarranere
The question of why some books "date" while some remain relevant and readable is one that has long puzzled writers, critics, and readers. THREE MEN IN A BOAT was published in 1889, was an immediate hit, and has never been out of print. After hearing about it all my life, I finally got around to reading it several years ago and am so glad to have it on my Kindle.

The author acquired his odd name from his father, who changed his own name from Jerome Clapp to Jerome Clapp Jerome and named his son after himself. At some stage the son changed his middle name to Klapa. The family was impoverished after the father's early death and the son received little education. At various times he worked for the railroad, as an actor, as a school teacher, and as a law clerk. He started writing humorous essays in the early 1880's and had several books of collected essays published. He hit the jackpot when he wrote THREE MEN IN A BOAT which (oddly enough) was actually based on his honeymoon on a small boat on the Thames River.

Either Mrs. Jerome didn't care to be featured in a book or her husband figured that he could get more comic situations out of a stag party. Whatever the reason, the characters are the narrator, his friends Harris and George, and Montmorency - a fox terrier who thinks he's a Great Dane. The three young men are all suffering from a variety of imaginary ailments (Montmorency is in fine fettle) and decide that they will spend their holidays sailing up the Thames.

It's difficult to say why the book is so entertaining, except that the humor is sly and yet very realistic. Although styles in clothing, food, and camping gear have changed dramatically, three guys setting out on such a trip today would have pretty much the same mix-ups, snafus, and snits as this trio. Human nature hasn't changed. This book was such a hit that the leisure activity of boating on the Thames became wildly popular and has been so ever since. Today, England has restored many of the canals that moved goods in past centuries and boating trips and even living permanently on boats is a huge industry. This author was never able to replicate his success in his later books, but he definitely left his mark. If you haven't read this one, you should.
Kuve Kuve
You have to appreciate this one as a product of its time period, but it's pretty funny on those grounds. It's not really the travel part that's so entertaining, but all the random conversations and stories along the way. There are some serious ones along the way as well, including one about a woman who threw herself in the river that was treated gently.

Example: "Cæsar, like, in later years, Elizabeth, seems to have stopped everywhere; only he was more respectable than good Queen Bess; he didn’t put up at the public-houses."

"In later years, Reading seems to have been regarded as a handy place to run down to, when matters were becoming unpleasant in London. Parliament generally rushed off to Reading whenever there was a plague on at Westminster; and, in 1625, the Law followed suit, and all the courts were held at Reading. It must have been worth while having a mere ordinary plague now and then in London to get rid of both the lawyers and the Parliament"
terostr terostr
A writer of a Kindle book recommended this old book for its humor, so I bought the Kindle version for 99 cents. True to the title, it is about three men, including the author, who go boating on England's waterways for a few weeks' vacation ("holiday" they would call it in England). The three pass through beautiful countryside, meet interesting people, and see some nearby towns quite interesting historically. I could imagine these excursions because I have visited England and on one visit saw one of their canals, including a lock that one man could open and close using a huge lever. What makes this book an enjoyable read, however, is its droll British humor. I come from New England and like dry humor, so I much enjoyed the book. I give it four stars, not five, however, because I don't think all readers would find this kind humor as scintillating as I did. Some of the humor is about the three themselves, each of whom thinks he does more work than the others; some is about various "characters" they meet, and some about the scrapes they get into. The boats they rent are propelled by various means, often alternating: flow of the river or stream, tow rope (with one or more of them pulling), oars and rigged-up sail. They prepare many of their meals en route, often botching the job, which is usually "the other fellow's fault." They get soaked at times either from the rain or by falling overboard. And from time to time, where there are onlookers, they become the object of public ridicule. Good read for many chuckles if you like the British humor.

About halfway through the book there is a beautiful thought expressed by the writer, seemingly out of context with the humorous story, arising more or less on its own. It reveals a sublime depth in the writer I would not otherwise have known: "... And we know that Pain and Sorrow are but the angels of God. Only those who have worn the crown of suffering can look upon that wondrous light; and they, when they return, may not speak of it, or tell the mystery they know" (pp 1393--97 of Kindle story).