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eBook World of Toil and Strife: Community Transformation in Backcountry South Carolina, 1750-1805 ePub

eBook World of Toil and Strife: Community Transformation in Backcountry South Carolina, 1750-1805 ePub

by Peter N. Moore

  • ISBN: 1570036667
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Peter N. Moore
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of South Carolina Press (April 5, 2007)
  • Pages: 176
  • ePub book: 1695 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1415 kb
  • Other: doc mbr txt lit
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 935

Description

Institute of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina.

Institute of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina. Grant issued to Duke University for the Religion in North Carolina project. Carol Grotnes Belk Library, Elon University.

Using the community of the Waxhaws as his proving ground, Peter N. Moore challenges the notion that the Carolina upcountry was a static, undeveloped backwater until entrepreneurial cotton planters entered the region after 1800

Using the community of the Waxhaws as his proving ground, Peter N. Moore challenges the notion that the Carolina upcountry was a static, undeveloped backwater until entrepreneurial cotton planters entered the region after 1800. Moore looks through the lens of a single community - a predominately Scots-Irish settlement in the lower Catawba River valley in what is today Using the community of the Waxhaws as his proving ground, Peter N.

book by Peter N. Moore. ISBN13:9780282824266. Release Date:October 2017.

Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2007

Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2007. In doing so, he challenges several popular beliefs: that southern backcountry society was isolated, static, and composed of self-sufficient yeoman households; that backcountry settlers were communal and cooperative; and that the arrival of cotton around 1800 wrenched the piedmont out of a yeoman society and into a market-oriented plantation economy. Best known as the birthplace of war hero and .

World of Toil and Strife Community Transformation in Backcountry South Carolina, 1750–1805. Moore shows that social tensions within the Waxhaw community drove its transformation, rather than the land-grabbing speculators and aggressive planters. He identifies forces for change: immigration patterns, neighborhood rivalries, population growth, and developing markets for slaves and wheat. By 1800 the Waxhaws bore little resemblance to the backcountry community of the late colonial period. Moore complicates the broader picture of the transformation of the Southern interior.

World of Toil and Strife: Community Transformation in the Carolina Backcountry, 1750-1805. Discuss the cultural mix of the Southern backcountry. 2. The Native Americans shown in this image are Creek. Waselkov, Gregory A. Powhatan’s Mantle: Indians in the American Southeast. Discuss the history of the Creek in the South and their relationship to the broader Five Tribes tradition. Consider issues of nationhood and independence from the . or other colonial powers. 3. Discuss the ways this painting implies the superiority of whites over Natives.

World of Toil and Strife: Community Transformation in Backcountry South Carolina, 1750-1805, by Peter N. Criminal Activity in the Deep South, 1700–1930: An Annotated Bibliography, noted, 88:239.

World's Columbian Exposition (1893), 92:54. World Series, 99:103, 105–6, 112; (1919), 82:359; (1945), 82:365. Wright, Daniel Webster, 68:192–93, 198, 207, 216, 220.

Human Rights in internal strife: their international protection - MeronTheodor, Human rights in Internal Strife: Their International Protection (Protection internationale des droits de l'homme dans les situations de troubles et tensions internes - Trad. CICR), Hersch Lauterpacht Memorial Lectures, Cambridge, Grotius Publications United, 1987 (172 p. Volume 70 Issue 769 - Hans Peter Gasser.

World of Toil and Strife: Community Transformation in Backcountry South Carolina, 1750-1805. The JBS continues its series of Book Chapters in Progress with Peter N. Moore's Introduction and Chapter 3 from his forthcoming book from the University of South Carolina Press, World of Toil an. More).

A murky shot of the William Richardson stone used in Peter N. Moore's World of Toil and Strife: Community Transformation in Backcountry South Carolina, 1750–1805 (Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 2007), 39, illustrates the problem. It leans against a tree and is partly illuminated by sunlight.

Using the community of the Waxhaws as his proving ground, Peter N. Moore challenges the notion that the Carolina upcountry was a static, undeveloped backwater until entrepreneurial cotton planters entered the region after 1800. Moore looks through the lens of a single community - a predominately Scots-Irish settlement in the lower Catawba River valley in what is today Fairfield, Lancaster, York, and Chester counties - to document the social, economic, and cultural characteristics of a locale that was dynamic before planters set their sights on piedmont South Carolina. Moore shows that social tensions within the Waxhaw community drove its transformation, rather than the land-grabbing speculators and aggressive planters. He identifies the forces for change within the Waxhaw community - immigration patterns, neighborhood rivalries, population growth, and developing markets for slaves and wheat.

Comments

Golden Lama Golden Lama
For over 20 years I have researched our Emigrant ancestor from Northern Ireland to MD>NC>SC 1737-until his death 1762 Carolinas backcountry - and followed his and his descendant's paper trails and DNA. During his, his wife's and his children's lives we have studied grant receipts, deeds, wills, lawsuits, friends and family links. I have all the books mentioned by the previous reviewer.

THIS is the book that solidifies and brings them "home" that clarifies the hard copy "paper trail" - it explains exactly what was happening as they literally cut communities from the thick forests and bottom lands, using daily survival skills under life threatening economic, political, social, spiritual changes of the times.

THIS book is brilliantly documented it pulls me to find the sources written in the index to "get even closer" to the lives of our ancestors. A true family historian never wishes to "end" the search. THIS book that tells you the why, what and how of your South Carolina Backcountry Settler.

One issue should be mentioned: the printer missed copying small parts of this book, a 1/4 page was blank in several instances, or cut off early. I purchased the paperback edition from Wordery through Amazon. It does not seriously detract of its value but should be noted so the printer can improve it.
CONVERSE CONVERSE
In my view, this is a not-to-be-missed book, particularly for anyone who wants to understand the South, its culture, and its history, though Professor Moore's technique can benefit anyone trying to understand a historic community located anywhere.

One reviewer described "World of Toil and Stife" as a slow read. I disagree. It is true that the writer has done more than due diligence in his research, and the footnotes are in themselves readable. Yet I could not put this book down once I opened it. And for the duration of my read, I was located firmly in the world whose history Moore delineates.

I've spent my life studying and teaching the literature and culture of the American South, all the while trying to reconcile critical differences between my own experience in the South and major scholarly interpretations of the region and its history.

In the ethereal theories of the Nashville Agrarians and Frank Owsley's Yeoman Farmer to Forest MacDonald's and Grady McWhiney's Scots-Irish, not to mention the work of historians and cultural geographers like Eaton,Cash, Genovese, Kniffen, and others, I've sought the element in the South that seemed defining.

Recently works like Parke Rouse's "The Great Wagon Road," Robert W. Ramsey's "Carolina Cradle: Settlement of Northwest Carolina Frontier, 1747-1762," and particularly Patrick Griffin's fine "The People with No Name: Ireland's Ulster Scots Irish, and the Creation of a British Atlantic World, 1689-1764" have opened new vistas on the ante-bellum period and its consequences for the 20th century.

Historian Peter Moore painstakingly recreates one of the early communities formed by this group, the legendary Waxhaws, SC, in the last half of the eighteenth century. In it, he discovers the origin and essence of the Southern character, which lies not in the elite world of cotton plantations, but in the hinterlands and the people who settled them.

Moore relocates the origins of Southernness to a period long before the incursions of the plantation system into the backcountry South. He shows how commercial agriculture, slavery, and the Protestant religion created a well-defined culture in the Southern backcountry immediately before and after the Revolution and long before cotton reached the area.

Instead of taking on a broad region, Moore locates his study in the Waxhaws, SC, the birthplace of Andrew Jackson and once home to a people that would in time cross the mountains into Tennessee and Kentucky and spread across the Deep South. In the Waxhaws, he finds that Yeoman farmer so many have talked about. Yet the gentleman in question is a lot more plausible and well-defined than he is in many texts.

Moore brings the Waxhaws to vivid life. The reader has a clear sense of who lives where, on what side of the creek the best farming land lies, how the Catawba Indian "old fields" guided settlement patterns,the characters of the Presbyterian congregations that define so much of life there. We watch some economic fortunes wax, while others decline, and we discover a much more commercially enterprising motive at work than early writers noted. In short, we watch a lively, dynamic community form.

And then we watch it disintegrate---not from incursions of the coastal planters and land speculators that would create a different community after this one was gone, but from population growth, community rivalries, changing markets for wheat and slaves, and the disintegrating forces of The Great Revival.

By 1800, the community once united by overlapping family ties, economic patterns, and religion was gone.

What replaced it, of course, was the slavery-driven cotton plantations.

Yet, the Waxhaws population had moved west. It changed in sundry ways, but its core commitments to family and religion recreated similar communities across the Old Southwest and into East Texas, even into the 20th century.

What both the Agrarians and their antagonists neglected was the dynamism that Moore makes abundantly clear. They had posited a romantic, static world, completely out of character with the real world of the old upland and piedmont South. The backcountry yeoman farmer loved place, for instance, but he was not averse to recreating that place when better land and opportunities presented themselves. For these were people who had moved through three parts of the British Atlantic empire. Once in the British American colonies, they had continued to move, first up the Delaware River valley, then south through the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and then into the Carolinas. Often they moved together, built new churches, plowed new land.

We see them in Flannery O'Connor's and Eudora Welty's stories; in Faulkner's Yoknapatawpha County; in Warren's Willie Stark, who might have been lured away from that community by disgrace and anger, but whose last words speak to the kind of ethical, religious accountability that organized all the little communities like the Waxhaws.

This is a remarkable, important book. It is solidly documented and original. Its language is clear and untrammeled by jargon. I highly recommend it to anyone who is seeking to understand the South or Southern history---or, for that matter, American history.