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eBook Legitimate Acts and Illegal Encounters: Law and Society in Antigua and Barbuda (Smithsonian Series in Ethnographic Inquiry) ePub

eBook Legitimate Acts and Illegal Encounters: Law and Society in Antigua and Barbuda (Smithsonian Series in Ethnographic Inquiry) ePub

by Mindie Lazarus-Black

  • ISBN: 1560983264
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Mindie Lazarus-Black
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Smithsonian; First Edition edition (June 17, 1994)
  • Pages: 357
  • ePub book: 1500 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1810 kb
  • Other: azw docx lrf rtf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 836

Description

Start by marking Legitimate Acts and Illegal Encounters: Law and Society in Antigua and Barbuda (Smithsonian Series in Ethnographic Inquiry) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Lazarus-Black analyzes historical and social transformation on the islands, using a theoretical framework drawn from Foucault's distinction between "systems of legalities" (the signs, symbols, and rituals of law) and "systems of illegalities" (common breaches of codes or explicit tolerance of illicit behaviors).

and Illegal Encounters : Law and Society in Antigua and Barbuda. by Mindie Lazarus-Black.

Legitimate Acts and Illegal Encounters : Law and Society in Antigua and Barbuda. Legitimate Acts and Illegal Encounters examines three hundred years of social life on the Caribbean islands of Antigua and Barbuda to demonstrate the importance of law and the state in the creation of West Indian societies.

3 Or they may have considered law to be a concern of Caribbean elites or colonial officials, not the stuff of popular class social and cultural life, and hence unworthy of the "thick . Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994.

3 Or they may have considered law to be a concern of Caribbean elites or colonial officials, not the stuff of popular class social and cultural life, and hence unworthy of the "thick description" that animates Caribbean village ethnography.

Washington: Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994. Article in Law & Social Inquiry 20(4):1089 - 1113 · July 2006 with 48 Reads.

Legitimate Acts and Illegal Encounters: Law and Society in Antigua and Barbuda. How we measure 'reads'.

xxv, 357 pages ; 24 cm. "Legitimate Acts and Illegal Encounters examines three . "Legitimate Acts and Illegal Encounters examines three hundred years of social life on the Caribbean islands of Antigua and Barbuda to demonstrate the importance of law and the state in the creation of West Indian societies.

Antigua and Barbuda adheres to the common external tariff schedule of CARICOM; rates (which range up to 35. .Lazarus-Black, Mindie. Legitimate Acts and Illegal Encounters: Law and Society in Barbuda and Antigua. Smithsonian Institution Press, 1994.

Antigua and Barbuda adheres to the common external tariff schedule of CARICOM; rates (which range up to 35%) are generally ad valorem, based on the cost, insurance, and freight value, and a wide range of goods is permitted duty-free entry. Additional special rates are applied for tobacco, cement, petroleum products, vans and trucks, and certain types of timber. User Contributions: 1.

Lazarus-Black, Mindie (1994). Legitimate Acts and Illegal Encounters: Law and Society in Antigua and Barbuda. Smithsonian Institution Press. Antigua and Barbuda Economic Report. MINDIE LAZARUS-BLACK.

Lazarus-Black, Mindie - Legitimate Acts and Illegal Encounters: Law and Society in Antigua and Barbuda. Rouse, Irving and Birgit Faber Morse - Excavations at th. Rouse, Irving and Birgit Faber Morse - Excavations at the Indian Creek Site, Antigua, West Indies.

Legitimate Acts and Illegal Encounters examines three hundred years of social life on the Caribbean islands of Antigua and Barbuda to demonstrate the importance of law and the state in the creation of West Indian societies. Moving from the periods of slavery and emancipation under British colonial rule to recent independence, Mindie Lazarus-Black argues that the continuing struggle between lawmakers and the nonruling class has shaped the distinctive character of creole kinship, class, and gender.Lazarus-Black analyzes historical and social transformation on the islands, using a theoretical framework drawn from Foucault's distinction between "systems of legalities" (the signs, symbols, and rituals of law) and "systems of illegalities" (common breaches of codes or explicit tolerance of illicit behaviors). She documents the differences between local behavior and Antiguan law under slavery; the impact of family, labor, and poor laws on kinship relations in the post-emancipation era; and, in contemporary times, how men and women use the law in ways lawmakers never imagined - as when women take men to court as a form of ritual shaming. Her research reveals that the same laws used by ruling classes as tools for punitive definitions have served lower classes as instruments of both defense and resistance. Legal strictures, she shows, have been used to keep the master class within its own written limits, to check elites' assumptions about the social world, and to push for a "justice" born of the experiences of the powerless.As this book demonstrates, the investigation of law and judicial processes is as central to the history and the anthropology of the powerless as it is to that of the elites. The author's interdisciplinary analysis of the dynamics of and between domination and resistance in creole society will inform students of anthropology, history, law and society, Caribbean studies, and women's studies.