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eBook Working in Steel (Oxford) (Canadian Social History Series) ePub

eBook Working in Steel (Oxford) (Canadian Social History Series) ePub

by Craig Heron

  • ISBN: 0771040865
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Craig Heron
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McClelland & Stewart; First Softcover Edition edition (March 15, 1988)
  • Pages: 223
  • ePub book: 1137 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1227 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf mobi lit
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 348

Description

Craig Heron is a Canadian social historian and public intellectual with a broad interest in labour and cultural history. A former president of the Canadian Historical Association, he is a professor emeritus at York University

Craig Heron is a Canadian social historian and public intellectual with a broad interest in labour and cultural history. A former president of the Canadian Historical Association, he is a professor emeritus at York University. Craig Heron grew up in the 1950s in a working-class household in suburban Toronto. The first in his family to go to university, he graduated with an Honours . in Modern History from the University of Toronto in 1970 and completed an .

Series: The Canadian social history series. Paperback: 207 pages. Publisher: McClelland & Stewart (January 1, 1978).

Working in Steel (Oxford) (Canadian Social History Series).

Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Craig Heron is a professor emeritus in the Department of History at York University and author of Working Steel: The Early Years in Canada, 1883-1935, also published by University of Toronto Press. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Working in Steel: The Early Years in Canada, 1883-1935.

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CRAIG HERON teaches in the Social Science Division and History Department of York University

CRAIG HERON teaches in the Social Science Division and History Department of York University. Библиографические данные.

Working in Steel: The Early Years in Canada, 1883-1935 (Canadian Social History Series). ISBN 9781442609846 (978-1-4426-0984-6) Softcover, University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division, 2008.

series Canadian Social History Series. Books related to Working in Steel.

The Early Years in Canada, 1883-1935. Series:Canadian Social History Series. University of toronto press.

Heron, Craig, Working in Steel, the Early Years in Canada, 1883-1935 (Toronto, McClelland & Stewart,1988). Oxford History of the United States series, of which I don't think I have seen anything negative written about any of the books in the series. This book examines the Canadian steel industry; Heron pays close attention to the processes of work, class struggle, and macro-economic trends of the early-20th century. Transforming Labour: Women and Work in Post War Canada (UTP, 2010).

Here is the story of how mass production came to Canada and what it meant for Canadian workers. Craig Heron's Working in Steel takes the reader inside the huge new steel plants that were built in Sydney, New Glasgow/Trenton, Hamilton, and Sault Ste. Marie at the turn of the century. Amid massive fire-breathing machines, we meet the steelworkers, many of them migrants from southern and eastern European villages or Newfoundland outports, who braved the smoke, noise, and heat in gruelling twelve-hour days, seven days a week. And we watch the inevitable conflicts that developed when these workers began to make demands on their bosses.

Professor Heron presents a stimulating new analysis of the Canadian working class in the early twentieth century, emphasizing the importance of changes in the work world for the larger patterns of working-class life. He examines the impact of new technology in Canada's Second Industrial Revolution, but challenges the popular notion that mass-production workers lost all skill, power, and pride in the work process. He shifts the explanation of managerial control in these plants from machines to the blunt authoritarianism and shrewd paternalism of corporate management. His discussion of Canada's first steelworkers sheds new light on the uneven, unpredictable, and conflict-ridden process of technological change in industrial capitalist society.