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eBook Seafaring Labour: The Merchant Marine of Atlantic Canada, 1820-1914 ePub

eBook Seafaring Labour: The Merchant Marine of Atlantic Canada, 1820-1914 ePub

by Eric W. Sager

  • ISBN: 0773506705
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Eric W. Sager
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press; First edition (April 1, 1989)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1631 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1918 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf txt rtf
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 251

Description

Merchant marine - Maritime Provinces - History - 19th century, Merchant marine - Newfoundland - History - 19th century, Merchant seamen - Maritime Provinces .

Merchant marine - Maritime Provinces - History - 19th century, Merchant marine - Newfoundland - History - 19th century, Merchant seamen - Maritime Provinces - History - 19th century, Merchant seamen - Newfoundland - History - 19th century.

Seafaring Labour: The Merchant Marine of Atlantic Canada, 1820-1914 - Libro electrónico escrito por Eric W. Sager. Lee este libro en la app de Google Play Libros en tu PC o dispositivo Android o iOS. Descarga Seafaring Labour: The Merchant Marine of Atlantic Canada, 1820-1914 para leerlo sin conexión, destacar texto, agregar marcadores o tomar notas. This book recounts the inspiring story of the residents of Gander, Canada, whose acts of kindness have touched the lives of thousands of people and been an example of humanity and goodwill.

However far from land they took their seafaring craft, sailors did not escape the influence of social relations created on land. seafaring, and one that much of the literature would seem to confirm.

Published by: McGill-Queen's University Press. However far from land they took their seafaring craft, sailors did not escape the influence of social relations created on land. For sailors the horizon of choice was narrow: none but the ignorant or the desperate would surely enter such a workplace

Seafaring Labour book.

Seafaring Labour book. Sager argues that sailors were not misfits or outcasts but were divorced. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Seafaring Labour: The Merchant Marine of Atlantic Canada, 1820-1914.

Seafaring labour: the merchant marine of Atlantic Canada, 1820-1914.

Discover more publications, questions and projects in Seafaring. The Lower Sort : Philadelphia's Laboring People, 1750–1800. Mutiny and Maritime Radicalism in the Age of Revolution.

With the coming of the age of steam, the sailor became part of a new division of labour and a new social hierarchy at sea.

Sager argues that sailors were not misfits or outcasts but were divorced from society only by virtue of their occupation. The wooden ships were small communities at sea, fragments of normal society where workers lived, struggled, and often died.

Book Overview With the coming of the age of steam, the sailor became part of a new division of labour and a new social hierarchy a. .

Sager argues that sailors were not misfits or outcasts but were divorced from society only by virtue of their occupation.

SAGER, Seafaring Labour: The Merchant Marine of Atlantic Canada, 1840–1914. oceedings{Landry1989SAGERSL, title {SAGER, Seafaring Labour: The Merchant Marine of Atlantic Canada, 1840–1914}, author {Nicholas Landry}, year {1989} }. Nicholas Landry.

Sager and Panting describe in detail the growth of the shipping industry and .

Sager and Panting describe in detail the growth of the shipping industry and the economic context in which the shipping merchants operated. Shipowning and shipbuilding were a central part of the mercantile economy of the Atlantic colonies of British North America. The shipowners of the region, Sager and Panting argue, were merchants first: they shifted their investments to landward enterprises because they believed Confederation offered new and better possibilities for commercial exchange.

Sager argues that sailors were not misfits or outcasts but were divorced from society only by virtue of their occupation. The wooden ships were small communities at sea, fragments of normal society where workers lived, struggled, and often died. With the coming of the age of steam, the sailor became part of a new division of labour and a new social hierarchy at sea. Sager shows that the sailor was as integral to the transition to industrial capitalism as any land worker.