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eBook Chicago's Battery Boys: The Chicago Mercantile Battery in the Civil War's Western Theater ePub

eBook Chicago's Battery Boys: The Chicago Mercantile Battery in the Civil War's Western Theater ePub

by Edwin Cole Bearss,Richard Brady Williams

  • ISBN: 1932714383
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Edwin Cole Bearss,Richard Brady Williams
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Savas Beatie; Revised edition (September 13, 2007)
  • Pages: 636
  • ePub book: 1639 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1712 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 561

Description

Richard Brady William's Chicago Battery Boys is a shining example of why their books, on so seemingly parochial .

Richard Brady William's Chicago Battery Boys is a shining example of why their books, on so seemingly parochial subjects, are so deserving of the time and money of student's of the Civil War. The book itself will catch your eye. The text will keep your attention. The Chicago Mercantile Battery was raised in the Windy City in 1862, in answer to the second great call for troops that went out that summer

The celebrated Chicago Mercantile Battery was organized by the .

The celebrated Chicago Mercantile Battery was organized by the Mercantile Association, a group of prominent Chicago merchants, and mustered into service in August of 1862. The Chicagoans would serve in many of the Western Theater's most prominent engagements until the war ended in the spring of 1865.

Richard Brady Williams is a business executive in the biotechnology field.

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The independant battery was made up of prominent Chicago merchants. Over 4,000 volumes in our inventory, specializing in the American Civil War, but also encompassing all American military history as well as Napoleonic titles. Mustered in in October 1862 they fought in the Vicksburg Campaign and later the Red River Campaign. The battery was overrun at Sabine Crossroads. Inscribed by the author on 12/12/05. Visit Seller's Storefront.

The celebrated Chicago Mercantile Battery was organized by the Mercantile Association . The Chicagoans would serve in many of the Western Theaters most prominent engagements until the war ended in the spring of 1865. The battery accompanied General William T. Sherman during his operations against Vicksburg as part of the XIII Corps under General A. J. Smith.

Chicago Mercantile Independent Battery Light Artillery was an artillery battery that served in the Union Army during the American Civil War. The battery was organized in Camp Douglas, Chicago, Illinois and mustered in for a three year enlistment on . . The battery was organized in Camp Douglas, Chicago, Illinois and mustered in for a three year enlistment on August 29, 1862 under the command of Captain Charles G. Cooley.

The Chicago Mercantile Battery was organized in 1862 by a group of prominent Chicago merchants. As part of Maj. Gen. John McClernand s 13th Corps, the battery participated in the long and arduous Vicksburg campaign. The artillerists performed well everywhere they were tested, including Chickasaw Bluffs, Port Gibson, Champion Hill, Big Black River, and the siege against Vicksburg.

by Richard Brady Williams. We can tell you if you would like this book! Rate some books to find out! Blurb. John McClernand's 13th Corps, the battery participated in the long and arduous Vicksburg campaign.

The Chicago Mercantile Battery was organized in 1862 by a group of prominent Chicago merchants. As part of Maj. Gen. John McClernand’s 13th Corps, the battery participated in the long and arduous Vicksburg campaign. The artillerists performed well everywhere they were tested, including Chickasaw Bluffs, Port Gibson, Champion Hill, Big Black River, and the siege against Vicksburg. Ancillary operations included the reduction of Arkansas Post, the capture of Jackson, and others. During the siege of Vicksburg on May 22, 1863, Captain Pat White and his “Battery Boys” took part in the bloody attack against the 2nd Texas Lunette, pushing a one-ton field piece up a ravine to fire point blank within the shadows cast by the enemy’s fortifications. (White and five of his artillerists would eventually receive the Medal of Honor for their valor that day.)After Vicksburg fell, the Chicago battery transferred to New Orleans for service under Maj. Gen. Nathaniel Banks, who was preparing an invasion along the Red River into Texas. At Sabine Crossroads (Mansfield) on April 8, 1864, the “Battery Boys” were overrun by the enemy and nearly wiped out. In addition to the killed and wounded, two dozen gunners were shipped off to a Southern prison. Letters from the Battery Boys broke the wall of silence Banks had erected and alerted the country to the disaster his army had suffered in Louisiana. Swift retribution against White’s cannoneers followed.Richard Brady Williams’ Chicago’s Battery Boys: The Chicago Mercantile Battery in the Civil War’s Western Theater sets forth in stunning detail the magnificent history of this long-overlooked artillery outfit. Based upon years of primary research and a wealth of archival documents, this study features more than 100 previously unpublished wartime letters, diaries, and other eyewitness reports that enrich our understanding of who these men were and what they endured for the cause of liberty and the Union. Williams skillfully weaves these contemporary accounts around a powerful narrative that will satisfy the most discriminating Civil War reader. This revised paperback edition features three dozen previously unpublished photographs of artillerists who served as “Battery Boys.”

Comments

Samuhn Samuhn
Well researched and written, "Chicago's Battery Boys" is a thoroughly engaging history of the diverse experiences of a group of young men serving together during the Civil War. While this book presents solid history, it is written largely from the perspective of the individual soldiers who lived through (and several who didn't) the campaigns and battles in which this unit was engaged. The use of diaries and reminiscences brings history to life. Being so far removed from when the events described in this book occurred, one tends to think of frail old men sporting grey beards fighting their way through the South, rather than the impossibly young and rather naive boys who found themselves thrust into the midst of such incredible events. This book brings it all to life and admirably captures the most profound experiences that rapidly transformed these young boys from Chicago into dependable men who took what they learned from the War to help build this great nation.
Vetalol Vetalol
A great collection of first hand accounts of life in the Missippi River campaigns. Real people reporting the experience.
Nagis Nagis
One of the few publishers still brave enough to issue regimental histories is Savas Beatie. What sets them apart are two things. The books themselves are always wonderfully designed and constructed. When you buy one of their books you get the real deal, top quality bindings and paper, bright illustrations, crisp text. But they also take care to make certain their readers get a good story. They do not give you the collated reprints of the Official Records that sometimes passes for a unit history.

Richard Brady William's Chicago Battery Boys is a shining example of why their books, on so seemingly parochial subjects, are so deserving of the time and money of student's of the Civil War. The book itself will catch your eye. The text will keep your attention. The Chicago Mercantile Battery was raised in the Windy City in 1862, in answer to the second great call for troops that went out that summer. Sent to Grant, they made their fame at Vicksburg where six of their number earned Congressional medals of honor when they carried one of their gun tubes by hand up to the rebel works and began firing at point-blank range through an undefended break in the wall. Their heaviest battle came a year later, at Sabine Crossroads, where they were the only gunners able to get their carriages off the field, only to have to spike them when the route of retreat became irretrievably snarled.

The book is packed with maps, illustrations, and pictures of the men who made this battery a great and memorable unit. The author freely reprints their letters in those instances where the participants themselves can tell the story best. When they can't, he steps in to clearly set out the course of events. If you have an interest in Grant and the western theater of the war, this book will be a welcome addition to your collection.
Painwind Painwind
Unlike so many unit histories, Richard Williams's new study on the Chicago Mercantile Battery is a deep, rich, and rewarding reading experience. The artillerists served from August of 1862 until the end of the war exclusively in the Western and Trans-Mississippi theaters. The high points of their service were during the Vicksburg campaign (where several received the coveted Medal of Honor) and along the Red River, where the battery was overrun and captured. In addition to offering a standard history of the war in a larger context and the battery's role therein, Williams weaves the letters of gunner Will Brown (and a few others) into the narrative. Brown's endlessly fascinating letters home to his father (which he wrote without believing they would ever be published) provide insight on battle experiences, slavery, presidential politics, generalship, and much more. Thanks to Brown's correspondence, we learn what he and his comrades were thinking and feeling while they were thinking and feeling it, instead of after years of reflection. An interesting twist develops when the coverage of the book splits to cover the survivors of Red River and their own unique ordeal, and the experiences of the other "Chicago's Battery Boys" who languished under terrible conditions in a Confederate prison. The extensive end notes span 120 pages, and the bibliography offers a wide array of firsthand research. Williams's study is well written and always interesting. Every history buff will profit from reading it. Includes a Foreword by notes historian Edwin C. Bearss. ISBN: 1-932714-06-5; photos, illus., original maps, roster, appendices, biblio., index, hardcover, d.j., 636 pages. $39.95

Highly recommended.