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eBook In Search of Chaco: New Approaches to an Archaeological Enigma (A School for Advanced Research Popular Archaeology Book) ePub

eBook In Search of Chaco: New Approaches to an Archaeological Enigma (A School for Advanced Research Popular Archaeology Book) ePub

by David Grant Noble

  • ISBN: 1930618425
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: David Grant Noble
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: School for Advanced Research Press; Paper edition edition (August 1, 2004)
  • Pages: 158
  • ePub book: 1659 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1109 kb
  • Other: lit mbr azw mobi
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 532

Description

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1930618425 (ISBN13: 9781930618428).

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Book Format: Choose an option. Popular Southwest Archaeology.

New Approaches to an Archaeological Enigma. Noble’s book is a treasure of questions and possibilites. is a highly recommended pleasure for everyone drawn to the mysteries of the Southwest’s human past. All brim with energy–not one is simply a didactic exercise. Barbara Riley, Santa Fe New Mexican. Richard Polese, Southwest BookViews.

How do some Hopis view Chaco Canyon? These are just a few of the topics addressed in Living the Ancient Southwest. In this illustrated anthology, readers will discover chapters written over the past several decades by rs.

Startling discoveries and impassioned debates have emerged from the "Chaco Phenomenon" since the publication of New Light on Chaco Canyon twenty years ago. This completely updated edition features seventeen original essays, scores of photographs, maps, and site plans, and the perspectives of archaeologists, historians, and Native American thinkers. Key topics include the rise of early great houses; the structure of agricultural life among the people of Chaco Canyon; their use of sacred geography and astronomy in organizing their spiritual cosmology; indigenous knowledge about Chaco from the perspective of Hopi, Tewa, and Navajo peoples; and the place of Chaco in the wider world of archaeology.

For more than a century archaeologists and others have pursued Chaco Canyon's many and elusive meanings. In Search of Chaco brings these explorations to a new generation of enthusiasts.

Comments

fetish fetish
you got to be " into" Chaco -- and then its got a lot of detail and info that's interesting. Not inspired writing -- just informative
Moralsa Moralsa
This book was recommended for my new job as a volunteer at Chaco. It is an excellent read, interesting, beautifully illustrated, without being too technical.
Alexandra Alexandra
This book has been put together and edited by one person. It is written by a number of authors. Each author writes about a different topic. There are also different views about the same topic. Book goes through some of the changes of the canyon and its peoples. Also, the purpose of this particular site. Very Interesting.
Paster Paster
Situated at least 20 miles from the nearest paved road, Chaco Canyon lies in a desolate plain equaldistant between Farmington and Grants, New Mexico. It is with sadness that I was unable to explore this wonderful place due to heavy monsoon rains that pelted the area during my vacation there in July of 2010. However, this volume edited by David Noble makes up for this shortfall to a small extent by incorporating narratives from archaeologists, national park offcials and various members of Native American tribes whose ancestors once inhabited this area centuries ago.

For a 130-page book, it is loaded with numerous illustrations and pictures of the great houses that dot Chaco Canyon including Pueblo Bonito and has information on other related places such as Aztec Ruins, Mesa Verde and Hovenweep in eastern Utah. It contains 17 chapters from people offering their perspectives of what went before. Questions that were attempted to be answered include how the pueblo peoples came to settle there in the first place; how they built the great houses; how did they lived and why they left. Without a written language it is hard to say how these events took place with great precision. In my opinion, I would probably trust the oral tradition handed down among the Native Americans.

If anyone is visiting Chaco Culture Historical Park in the future, I would recommend reading this book to get a adequate background on the place. If you visit, make sure you have good struts on you automobile and hope it doesn't rain.
Deeroman Deeroman
Chaco Canyon is in the middle of nowhere, a unexceptional canyon in the New Mexico desert where nobody in his right mind would try to make a living. All the more amazing is that this barren place was the center of the Anasazi civilization. The Great House of Pueblo Bonito is the largest pre-historic building north of Mexico, counting 800 rooms and constructed about 1,000 years ago.

Chaco is mysterious and this book of seventeen essays by authorities in several fields explores those mysteries. One is given the point of view of the scholars as well as representatives of the Pueblo, Hopi, and the Navajo Indians. Good charts, maps, and photos, some in color, support the text. Perhaps the most interesting of all the mysteries is how the Anasazi fed themselves in this unpromising environment and a brief sidebar talks about Chaco agriculture -- although not enough.

The most interesting essay in the book is titled "The Chaco Navajos" and is about the coming of the Navajos, the Spaniards, and the Anglos to Chaco Canyon long after the Anasazi had disappeared. Included is a brief account of pioneer archaeologist, Richard Wetherill, killed in a gunfight with a Navajo in 1910. "Richard Wetherill Anasazi" by Frank McNitt is a fine biography of Wetherill, a character worthy of legend.

"In Search of Chaco" is an attractive, up-to-date look at current theories and thinking about Chaco. One suspects there's a lot more to learn. One quibble: I despise the politically correct term "Ancestral Pueblo" used by the scholars for the people who built Chaco. The old and romantic name, "Anasazi," is far preferable.

Smallchief
Zonama Zonama
Chaco Canyon is in the middle of nowhere, a unexceptional canyon in the New Mexico desert where nobody in his right mind would try to make a living. All the more amazing is that this barren place was the center of the Anasazi civilization. The Great House of Pueblo Bonito is the largest pre-historic building north of Mexico, counting 800 rooms and constructed about 1,000 years ago.

Chaco is mysterious and this book of seventeen essays by authorities in several fields explores those mysteries. One is given the point of view of the scholars as well as representatives of the Pueblo, Hopi, and the Navajo Indians. Good charts, maps, and photos, some in color, support the text. Perhaps the most interesting of all the mysteries is how the Anasazi fed themselves in this unpromising environment and a brief sidebar talks about Chaco agriculture -- although not enough.

The most interesting essay in the book is titled "The Chaco Navajos" and is about the coming of the Navajos, the Spaniards, and the Anglos to Chaco Canyon long after the Anasazi had disappeared. Included is a brief account of pioneer archaeologist, Richard Wetherill, killed in a gunfight with a Navajo in 1910. "Richard Wetherill Anasazi" by Frank McNitt is a fine biography of Wetherill, a character worthy of legend.

"In Search of Chaco" is an attractive, up-to-date look at current theories and thinking about Chaco. One suspects there's a lot more to learn. One quibble: I despise the politically correct term "Ancestral Pueblo" used by the scholars for the people who built Chaco. The old and romantic name, "Anasazi," is far preferable.

Smallchief