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eBook The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-Century South ePub

eBook The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-Century South ePub

by Dylan C. Penningroth

  • ISBN: 080785476X
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Dylan C. Penningroth
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The University of North Carolina Press (September 22, 2003)
  • Pages: 192
  • ePub book: 1484 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1716 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi docx mbr
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 288

Description

An imaginative analysis that enables to go beyond the existence of the informal economy to probe the ways it shaped black life during and after slavery.

In Claims of Kinfolk, Dylan Penningroth uncovers an extensive informal economy of property ownership among slaves and sheds new light on African American family and community life from the heyday of plantation slavery to the "freedom generation" of the 1870s

In Claims of Kinfolk, Dylan Penningroth uncovers an extensive informal economy of property ownership among slaves and sheds new light on African American family and community life from the heyday of plantation slavery to the "freedom generation" of the 1870s. By focusing on relationships among blacks, as well as on the more familiar struggles between the races, Penningroth exposes a dynamic process of community and family definition

The Claims of Kinfolk book.

The Claims of Kinfolk book. In Claims of Kinfolk, Dylan Penningroth uncovers an extensive. In Claims of Kinfolk, Dylan Penningroth uncovers an extensive informal economy of property ownership among slaves and sheds new light on African American family and community life from the heyday of plantation slavery to the "freedom generation" of the 1870s.

Winner of the 2004 Avery O. Craven Award of the Organization of American Historians, The Claims of Kinfolk makes a significant contribution to the fields of African American, southern, and American legal history; in the process it uses property to rethink basic questions of law, power, and community.

The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-century South. Univ of North Carolina Press. ISBN 978-0-8078-5476-1

The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-century South. ISBN 978-0-8078-5476-1. Edward E. Baptist; Stephanie M. H. Camp, eds. (2006). My People, My People". New Studies in the History of American Slavery. University of Georgia Press. ISBN 978-0-8203-2694-8.

Dylan C. Penningroth specializes in African American history and in . His first book, The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-Century South(Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003), won the Avery Craven Prize from the Organization of American Historians.

Schweninger, Loren, 2004. The Claims of Kinfolk: African American Property and Community in the Nineteenth-Century South. By Dylan C. Penningroth. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation. University of North Carolina Press. The John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture. 0807827975, 080785476X. 0807827975,080785476X,0807827975,080785476X. This item appears on. List: HS3S42: Slavery in America.

Keywords: Claims of Kinfolk, American Property, Century South, African American, nineteenth century, Dylan.

In The Claims of Kinfolk, Dylan Penningroth uncovers an extensive informal economy of property ownership among slaves and sheds new light on African American family and community life from the heyday of plantation slavery to the "freedom generation" of the 1870s. By focusing on relationships among blacks, as well as on the more familiar struggles between the races, Penningroth exposes a dynamic process of community and family definition. He also includes a comparative analysis of slavery and slave property ownership along the Gold Coast in West Africa, revealing significant differences between the African and American contexts.Property ownership was widespread among slaves across the antebellum South, as slaves seized the small opportunities for ownership permitted by their masters. While there was no legal framework to protect or even recognize slaves' property rights, an informal system of acknowledgment recognized by both blacks and whites enabled slaves to mark the boundaries of possession. In turn, property ownership--and the negotiations it entailed--influenced and shaped kinship and community ties. Enriching common notions of slave life, Penningroth reveals how property ownership engendered conflict as well as solidarity within black families and communities. Moreover, he demonstrates that property had less to do with individual legal rights than with constantly negotiated, extralegal social ties.

Comments

great ant great ant
I bought this book after meeting the author and discussing his work with him. It's a great book. It won a well-deserved McArthur Genius Award for Penningroth. His work is based on original research into documents in the National Archives that have been overlooked for decades. He uses the records of property claims made by slaves after the civil war to learn about the African-American family. Very readable, too.
Dusar Dusar
Besides being a major new window onto African-American history, this book recasts our understanding of property and its relationship with state power--reminding us that ideas about property come "from below". a stellar achievement!