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eBook Changing Channels: The Civil Rights Case that Transformed Television ePub

eBook Changing Channels: The Civil Rights Case that Transformed Television ePub

by Kay Mills

  • ISBN: 1578065194
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Kay Mills
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University Press of Mississippi (April 5, 2004)
  • Pages: 232
  • ePub book: 1491 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1729 kb
  • Other: doc mbr lrf rtf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 642

Description

In the years before the civil rights era, American broadcasting reflected the interests of the white mainstream, especially in the . Today, the face of local television throughout the nation mirrors the diversity of the local populations.

In the years before the civil rights era, American broadcasting reflected the interests of the white mainstream, especially in the South. The impetus for change began in 1964, when the Office of Communication of the United Church of Christ and two black Mississippians, Aaron Henry and Reverend R. L. T. Smith, challenged the broadcasting license of WLBT, an NBC affiliate in Jackson, Mississippi. The lawsuit was the catalyst that would bring social reform to American broadcasting.

Home Browse Books Book details, Changing Channels: The Civil Rights Case That. They had entered the world of television with a network-affiliated station that broadcast bandleader Mitch Miller's show and other entertainment as well as news to much of the state

Home Browse Books Book details, Changing Channels: The Civil Rights Case That. Changing Channels: The Civil Rights Case That Transformed Television. They had entered the world of television with a network-affiliated station that broadcast bandleader Mitch Miller's show and other entertainment as well as news to much of the state. a major institution in town, Lamar Life Insurance Company, once run by writer Eudora Welty's father, owned the station.

Kay Mills (February 4, 1941 – January 13, 2011) was a journalist and author of five non-fiction books who revived the nearly-lost stories of women journalists and civil rights icons. She died at age 69 after a sudden heart attack in Santa Monica, California, where she lived. Her first book, A Place in the News: From the Women’s Pages to the Front Page, a 1988 history of women in journalism, is still widely used in college journalism and women's studies courses

Her subjects have included the history and influence of women in the newspaper business, women's history in the United States, Mississippi civil rights leader Fannie Lou Hamer, and the Head Start preschool program for low-income children. She has twice been a juror for the Pulitzer Prize for biography, once as chair of the jury

CIVIL RIGHTS ¨ HISTORY ¨ BROADCAST JOURNALISM- In the years before the civil rights era, American broadcasting . Today, the face of local television throughout the nation mirrors the diversity of the local populations

CIVIL RIGHTS ¨ HISTORY ¨ BROADCAST JOURNALISM- In the years before the civil rights era, American broadcasting reflected the interests of the white mainstream,.

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the civil rights case that transformed television. Published 2004 by University Press of Mississippi in Jackson, Miss. Federal Communications Commission, Television broadcasting, African Americans in television broadcasting, WLBT (Television station : Jackson, Miss. African Americans on television, United States, African Americans, History. Serving whose public interest? Enter Warren Burger.

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In the early years before the civil rights era, American broadcasting reflected the interests of the white mainstream, especially in the South. The impetus for change began in 1964, when the Office of Communication of the United Church of Christ and two black Mississippians, Aaron Henry and Reverend .

In a recent book of essays on the media and the civil rights movement, Julian Bond speculated that "until.

In addition, two new books have focused on the WLBT case in Mississippi: Steven D. Classen, Watching Jim Crow: The Struggles Over Mississippi TV, 1955-1969 (Durham: Duke University Press, 2004) and Kay Mills, Changing Channels: The Civil Rights Case that Transformed Television (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2004). We know very little about what was aired on the local television news across the South and have little notion of how these broadcasts were received and what differences they made.

In the years before the civil rights era, American broadcasting reflected the interests of the white mainstream, especially in the South. Today, the face of local television throughout the nation mirrors the diversity of the local populations.

The impetus for change began in 1964, when the Office of Communication of the United Church of Christ and two black Mississippians, Aaron Henry and Reverend R. L. T. Smith, challenged the broadcasting license of WLBT, an NBC affiliate in Jackson, Mississippi. The lawsuit was the catalyst that would bring social reform to American broadcasting.

This station in a city whose population was 40 percent black was charged with failure to give fair coverage to civil rights and to integration issues that were dominating the news. Among offenses cited by the black population were the cancellation of a network interview with the civil rights attorney Thurgood Marshall and editorializing against the integration of the University of Mississippi.

However, muscle, money, and a powerhouse Washington, D.C., law firm were on the side of the station. Despite the charges, the Federal Communications Commission twice renewed the station's license. Twice the challengers won appeals to the federal courts. Warren Burger, then a federal appeals court judge, wrote decisions on both challenges. The first ordered the FCC to allow public participation in its proceedings. The second, an unprecedented move, took the license from WLBT.

This well-told, deeply researched history of the case covers the legal battles over their more than fifteen years and reports the ultimate victory for civil rights. Aaron Henry, a black civil rights leader and one of the plaintiffs, became the station's chairman of the board. WLBT's new manager, William Dilday, was the first black person in the South to hold such a position.

Burger's decision on this Mississippi case had widescale repercussions, for it allowed community groups in other regions to challenge their stations and to negotiate for improved services and for the employment of minorities.

Comments

Mr_TrOlOlO Mr_TrOlOlO
A detailed and well-written historical account of the onerous process by which control of local TV broadcasting was finally wrested from segregationists who wanted to control content and limit participation by a particular demographic group. This story (and the ultimate positive impact of the final decision) foreshadows and remains highly relevant to today's debates over media consolidation, telecommunication regulation, Internet governance, and the importance of regulatory independence and transparency in preserving a free and open media to sustain a free society.
Atineda Atineda
In this, the fiftieth anniversary of the filing of the petition to deny the renewal of the FCC license of WLBT TV in Jackson, Mississippi,
one has to wonder whether a case like this would ever occur again. The media and its regulated technology are barely recognizable today from the what was "state of the art" then and much of the conservative right wing of government would be opposed to much of the D.C. court of appeals approach to being harsh with those with broadcast licenses.

Today, fewer citizens even understand the role of the FCC, much less the right to have the telecommunications regulatory body preserve the public interest. Perhaps when history is written fifty years from now, we as a nation will realize that we cannot think that we can take for granted the protection of the public interest by our government.