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eBook Scorched Earth: How the Fires of Yellowstone Changed America ePub

eBook Scorched Earth: How the Fires of Yellowstone Changed America ePub

by Rocky Barker

  • ISBN: 1559637358
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Rocky Barker
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Island Press; First Edition edition (September 19, 2005)
  • Pages: 288
  • ePub book: 1111 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1116 kb
  • Other: docx mobi azw txt
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 836

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Электронная книга "Scorched Earth: How the Fires of Yellowstone Changed America", Rocky Barker.

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Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. With vivid descriptions of the famous fires that have raged in Yellowstone, the heroes who have tried to protect it, and the strategies that evolved as a result, Barker draws us into the very heart of a debate over our attempts to control nature and people. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

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Rocky Barker's Scorched Earth is clear well written history of wildland fire. In more recent history, Barker's explanations of how the Yellowstone and Storm King fires changed fire management and fire suppression strategies are critical to understanding what is going on today. The work clearly stands on the shoulders of previous chroniclers of wildland fire, particularly Stephen Pyne, and ties the work of pioneers in fire ecology to today's prescribed fire programs. Barker highlights experts who question the conventional wisdom that "a century of fire suppression has made forests more vulnerable to fires.

Rocky Barker is the author of Scorched Earth: How the Fires of Yellowstone Changed America (Island Press, 2005). The book was a finalist for the Western Writers of America's Spur Award in nonfiction. The story inspired a television movie, Firestorm: Last Stand at Yellowstone on A&E Network in 2006 starring Scott Foley and Richard Burgi and co-produced by Barker. His first book, Saving All the Parts, Reconciling Economics and the Endangered Species Act, was published in 1993 also by Island Press.

Rocky Barker is the author of Scorched Earth: How the Fires of Yellowstone Changed America. The highly acclaimed book was a finalist for the Western Writers of America's Spur Award in nonfiction. The story has inspired a television movie, Firestorm: Last Stand at Yellowstone on A&E Network starring Scott Foley and Richard Burgi and co-produced by Rocky.

Scorched Earth: How the fires of Yellowstone changed America. Island Press/Washington. The ecological implications of fire in Greater Yellowstone: proceedings of the second biennial conference on the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem. International Association of Wildland Fire.

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In 1988, forest fires raged in Yellowstone National Park, destroying more than a million acres. As the nation watched the land around Old Faithful burn, a longstanding conflict over fire management reached a fever pitch. Should the U.S. Park and Forest Services suppress fires immediately or allow some to run their natural course? When should firefighters be sent to battle the flames and at what cost?In Scorched Earth, Barker, an environmental reporter who was on the ground and in the smoke during the 1988 fires, shows us that many of today's arguments over fire and the nature of public land began to take shape soon after the Civil War. As Barker explains, how the government responded to early fires in Yellowstone and to private investors in the region led ultimately to the protection of 600 million acres of public lands in the United States. Barker uses his considerable narrative talents to bring to life a fascinating, but often neglected, piece of American history. Scorched Earth lays a new foundation for examining current fire and environmental policies in America and the world.Our story begins when the West was yet to be won, with a colorful cast of characters: a civil war general and his soldiers, America's first investment banker, railroad men, naturalists, and fire-fighters-all of whom left their mark on Yellowstone. As the truth behind the creation of America's first national park is revealed, we discover the remarkable role the U.S. Army played in protecting Yellowstone and shaping public lands in the West. And we see the developing efforts of conservation's great figures as they struggled to preserve our heritage. With vivid descriptions of the famous fires that have raged in Yellowstone, the heroes who have tried to protect it, and the strategies that evolved as a result, Barker draws us into the very heart of a debate over our attempts to control nature and people.This entertaining and timely book challenges the traditional views both of those who arrogantly seek full control of nature and those who naively believe we can leave it unaltered. And it demonstrates how much of our broader environmental history was shaped in the lands of Yellowstone.

Comments

Berenn Berenn
I beleive Fire on the Mountain by John MacLean did far more to make change in the fire fighting community than did Scorched Earth. I am somewhat familiar with the Yellowstone fire. I did not see the expected resolutions and perhaps suggestions to go forward with better planning et al that I expected at the beginning of the book other than the tributes paid to the ongoing studies by the various scientists and their assistants in studying the recovery. Such follow up is also ongoing at the Point Reyes National Seashore in California after the Vision fire of 13 years ago. I felt the book dealt more with the controversy of past policy. The "Ah! Ha" you'd expect wasn't there.
BeatHoWin BeatHoWin
A clash of cultures hit Yellowstone National Park in the summer of 1988. New National Park Service ideas on using fire as a tool, and giving natural fires great latitude to burn -- an attitude held in part even my the U.S. Forest Service and other federal outdoors agencies -- ran head-on into the general public's Smokey the Bear says put fires out attitude.

The NPS came under a lot of flak after much of Yellowstone was scorched that summer. Then, in 1989 and thereafter, much of the media spun the story of the Phoenix -- the "rebirth" of Yellowstone.

Barker says the rebirth, at least as normally written up, is a myth, one of many still attached to the fires of 1988.

The biggest myth, still held by many people in various federal outdoors agencies, is that nature in general can be isolated, in wilderness areas, in a state of "reality." The second biggest myth is that fires, no matter the size and spread, can be managed or controlled.

The burn policy at Yellowstone and other national parks, as well as in other federal land agencies has only become more and more a political football between environmentalists and "wise use" types of the West.

Barker, though his sympathies are clearly not with the old-style U.S. Forest Service, makes clear that the modern USFS shouldn't be as demonized as it is by some environmentalists.

The one regret I have with this book is that Barker sounds knowledgeable enough to be more prescriptive about a future course for fire management. Other than citing the obvious lessons from Yellowstone, such as clearing brush further away from buildings in wild and "natural" areas, he doesn't go beyond that with ideas for future generations.
Tinavio Tinavio
This book really caught my attention by delving deep into the history of fire management in the west from the first notions of keeping Yellowstone a contiguous wild place to the present. For anyone who is interested in the history of the world's first national park, this is a must read. For people like me who were shaped by the Yellowstone fires of 1988, it takes readers behind the scary headlines and apocalyptic nightly news reports of the time.
Centrizius Centrizius
Rocky Barker uncovers a lot information about US fire policy. When I got this book for X-mas I thought it might be another one of the same old song fire books. Once I started reading it I became "fired up" again about US fire policy.

Those that have worked in the wildland fire service should really enjoy reading how people in the Forest Service and conservation movement recognized early in the last century that suppression policy was a mistake that would lead to the problems we are having today.

Well written and researched. Any fire managers out there ought to buy a copy for the office.
Tygolar Tygolar
This is a great book that offers insights into the many turning points of U.S. wildland fire history, starting with the first efforts by the U.S. Army to fight fire in Yellowstone. The focus on Yellowstone is deceptive, as much of what Barker says is relevant for the entire western U.S.

While Stephen Pyne's books are unparalleled for their in-depth histories of fire, Barker's book is far more readable and really covers the highlights of wildland fire management. A chapter on John Wesley Powell suggests that this history could have been far different if McKinley had not been assassinated, making Roosevelt president and giving Gifford Pinchot the upper hand in fire bureaucracy. Powell's understanding of fire was far better than Pinchot's.

In more recent history, Barker's explanations of how the Yellowstone and Storm King fires changed fire management and fire suppression strategies are critical to understanding what is going on today. Barker highlights experts who question the conventional wisdom that "a century of fire suppression has made forests more vulnerable to fires." In fact, the large fires of the last few years are more the result of drought and policy changes that trade off more acres burned for increased firefighter safety.

Everyone concerned with federal land management, which more than anything else is about wildfire management, should read this book.
Gom Gom
Yellowstone National Park is an awesome place, and Rocky Barker's "Scorched Earth: How the Fires of Yellowstone Changed America" is an awesome book. I discovered it through Facebook, where I renewed an acquaintance with Barker that dates back to the days when he was editor of the Rhinelander Daily News.

Rocky is now an environmental writer for the Idaho Statesman, and he had a first-row seat for the forest fires that burned more than a million acres in Yellowstone and environs in 1988.

But his story is also a history of Yellowstone, the world's first national park, and efforts to exploit it and preserve it. Not surprisingly, The Great Northern Railroad wanted to exploit Yellowstone and make it a Disneyland type theme park.

But Civil War general Philip Sheridan, the Indian fighter, wanted to preserve it. Sheridan was joined by the likes of Teddy Roosevelt, John Muir, Aldo Leopold, Gifford Pinchot and many others who weren't always tugging together but helped create Yellowstone and the other national parks we have today.

The book put the history of the conservation movement into perspective for me. I promptly ordered a copy for friends who are visiting Yellowstone.