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eBook The Secret Life of Cowboys ePub

eBook The Secret Life of Cowboys ePub

by Tom Groneberg

  • ISBN: 0743236106
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Tom Groneberg
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Scribner; First Edition edition (June 17, 2003)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1267 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1211 kb
  • Other: azw lrf mobi lit
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 209

Description

The book takes us through Tom Groneberg's experiences as a horse trail guide, ranch hand, and ranch manager. In Tom Groneberg's "The Secret Life of Cowboys" we are treated to the inside story of a personal quest to be a cowboy. Published on March 17, 2009.

The book takes us through Tom Groneberg's experiences as a horse trail guide, ranch hand, and ranch manager. Groneberg learns that life in the West is hard, cold, and unforgiving. Groneberg wants so desperately to be a part of this culture, but he never fully explains why. Perhaps this is part of the mystery of this region, the allure.

Tom Groneberg leaves behind friends and family, follows his heart, and . The sincerity of the author is what I loved about this book.

Tom Groneberg leaves behind friends and family, follows his heart, and heads to a resort town in the Colorado Rockies, where he earns his spurs as a wrangler leading tourists on horseback. Demystifying the image of cowboys as celluloid heroes, The Secret Life of Cowboys is a coming-of-age story as stunning as the land itself and a revealing look at America’s last frontier. happy to note that this book contained no swearing.

Tom Groneberg is the author of The Secret Life of Cowboys and has written for a number of publications, including Men's Journal and Sports Afield. He lives in northwest Montana with his wife, three sons, and his horse, Blue. Библиографические данные. The Secret Life of Cowboys.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Across the rugged and beautiful landscape of the contemporary American West, Tom Groneberg paints an unsparing portrait of his flawed, funny, and sometimes triumphant efforts to become a cowboy. It is a classic tale: a young man, facing a future he doesn't want to claim, has an inspiration - Go West. Leaving behind his friends and family, Groneberg follows his heart and heads to a resort town in the Colorado Rockies, where he earns his spurs as a wrangler leading tourists on horseback. Like an old saddle blanket, the tale unfolds, revealing the clean threads of a new story.

Groneberg, Tom, 1966-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

The secret in the secret life of cowboys remains something of an elusive mystery for Groneberg. Along with him, we observe cowboys from the outside, a fraternity of men engaged in hard, physical labor, masters of skills learned from boyhood, able to do their jobs in severe working conditions, and possessors of a kind of grace beyond words to describe. Groneberg's book is an attempt over and over to capture this grace in words, always falling a little short, while making ever more vivid the extent of his admiration

Groneberg moves to Montana, working for wages at a number of ranches before getting a chance to become the owner of a sprawling ranch, fifteen square miles of grass and . Books related to The Secret Life of Cowboys.

Groneberg moves to Montana, working for wages at a number of ranches before getting a chance to become the owner of a sprawling ranch, fifteen square miles of grass and sky. In lean but passionate prose, Groneberg demystifies the image of cowboy as celluloid hero and introduces us to the tough and kindhearted men who teach him how to be a real cowboy, the woman who teaches him how to love, and their son, who teaches him how to be a man. The Secret Life of Cowboys is both a coming-of-age story as stunning as the land itself and a revealing look at America's last frontier.

Across the rugged and beautiful landscape of the contemporary American West, Tom Groneberg paints an unsparing portrait of his flawed, funny, and sometimes triumphant efforts to become a cowboy.

comAs a young suburbanite from Chicago, Tom Groneberg first falls in love with horses and the rural West during a stint as a guide on a Colorado dude ranch

comAs a young suburbanite from Chicago, Tom Groneberg first falls in love with horses and the rural West during a stint as a guide on a Colorado dude ranch. In this affecting memoir, he traces his decade-long attempt to shrub all evidence of his strip-mall roots through a series of cowboy jobs-mending fences, baling hay, and disposing of dead calves while working as a cattle hand.

August 12, 2011 History. Published 2003 by Scribner in New York.

The author recounts his post-college discovery that he wanted to be a cowboy, his early days as a poor ranch hand, his marriage and home in an unfinished log cabin, and his eventual attainment of a sprawling ranch.

Comments

Rrd Rrd
I grew up in the fifties when Gene Autry, Roy Rogers and Rex Allen were Saturday matinee heroes. So of course I wanted to be a cowboy too. I had the sixguns (cap pistols) and the hat and my brothers and I rode the range of the local sandpit on our imaginary mounts. Then I graduated to Peckinpah and adult westerns and eventually forgot about being a cowboy. Tom Groneberg never did. After finishing college in Illinois he headed west and chased his dream of cowboying, first as a dude ranch trail guide, then as a real ranch hand. He rode broncos a couple times He even had his own ranch for a while, but found out there was a lot more to ranching than meets the eye - too much pressure, too many heartbreaks. So he went back to working for wages. And he wrote it all down - all the stories about horses and hay crops and cows and rodeos. And there's a love story in there too. He loved the land and cowboying, of course, but most of all he loved his wife, Jennifer, who was with him through all of this stuff. And he learned about being a father. There's plenty of great prose here about riding the range and branding and just plain working his butt to a tired nub. But here's a passage that nearly made me cry, about being there when his son was born -

"I hold Jennifer's hand the entire night, through the contractions and the fears. And then, after seventeen hours, it is time. I have seen so many cows give birth, witnessed the bloody miracle of a calf's first breath, but when the nurses coax me to look at the crown of my son's head as it pushes into the world, I cannot. Instead I watch Jennifer, her beautiful and weary face. I don't know how to explain why I can't watch the birth, except to say that it is too much."

There it is. It is too much. Montana, cows, calves, love and baby boys. Groneberg writes about all these things and more with extraordinary grace and an eloquent simplicity that sometimes made me want to weep. Gene and Roy and Rex taught me about honesty and how to treat ladies and babies - and horses. Those guys would have been proud to know Tom Groneberg. This is a profoundly moving story. I recommend it highly and am looking forward now to reading Tom's other book, One Good Horse. - Tim Bazzett, author of Pinhead: A Love Story
Drelalen Drelalen
As a third-generation Montana rancher -- from the very region where Groneberg tried ranching -- and a lifelong writer, I have seen many books on this theme: urban boy has a cowboy dream, hires on, writes about it. But this is probably the best I've read. Groneberg is a very good writer. His prose is simple, clear, and almost poetic. He is open, honest, and factual. Most of all, he treats the men and the lifestyle with respect. It perhaps just falls short of five stars, but is better than four stars. Hence, I give it five because the West is about making "an honest effort." Groneberg does that.
Whitescar Whitescar
I haven't read anything in a long while that captivated me, and swept me away to the range like this read. I loved every minute of this lyrical, slender novel.

Beautifully written and moving, it has just enough down to earth, real life Cowboy-isms mixed with universal themes and memorable, thoughtful ideas to satisfy.

If you're looking for a respite from our chaotic world, pick this up. I guarantee you'll find it entertaining, provocative, sweet, yet pointed.
Dynen Dynen
Very interesting book. Service was excellent.
MrCat MrCat
Just a gripping story = could only be told by someone who lived it.
Tygrarad Tygrarad
This book touched me deeply after my own much shallower plunge into ranching- Tom says it all so well and so poignantly.
Xava Xava
Liked it but sometimes you wanted to strangle the main character :-)
I respect and admire Groneberg's tenacity and will to become part of the West and to write this book. The book takes us through Tom Groneberg's experiences as a horse trail guide, ranch hand, and ranch manager. Gone are the perfectly dirtied cowboy hats that today's country "musicians" wear...Groneberg learns that life in the West is hard, cold, and unforgiving.
Groneberg wants so desperately to be a part of this culture, but he never fully explains why. Perhaps this is part of the mystery of this region, the allure. This book reminds me of a modern-day My Antonia in parts--especially his descriptions of the harsh winters he and his wife endure in Montana.
What I come away with after reading this memoir is that it's difficult to be a man today--especially when you're a man drawn to a hard life. Ranching is not as simple and pastoral as it seems. Growing up on a farm allowed me to empathize with Groneberg in parts and allowed me to predict outcomes in others. I would encourage those who haven't had much experience with the "cowboy way" to read this memoir and leave the country music videos on mute. Groneberg paints a realistic picture of what the life of a cowboy is like in the modern age.