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eBook They Saved the Crops: Labor, Landscape, and the Struggle over Industrial Farming in Bracero-Era California (Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation Ser.) ePub

eBook They Saved the Crops: Labor, Landscape, and the Struggle over Industrial Farming in Bracero-Era California (Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation Ser.) ePub

by Melissa Wright,Nik Heynen,Don Mitchell

  • ISBN: 0820341754
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Melissa Wright,Nik Heynen,Don Mitchell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press (April 1, 2012)
  • Pages: 576
  • ePub book: 1673 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1240 kb
  • Other: rtf lrf lit mobi
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 453

Description

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Mitchell achieves more than enough in They Saved The Crops to distinguish this book as the history of record for the Bracero program

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. At the outset of World War II, California agriculture seemed to be on the cusp of change. Mitchell achieves more than enough in They Saved The Crops to distinguish this book as the history of record for the Bracero program. Matt Garcia Journal of Historical Geography).

Don Mitchell is a distinguished professor of geography at the Maxwell School of Syracuse University. He is the author of many books including The Right to the City: Social Justice and the Fight for Public Space and The Lie of the Land: Migrant Workers and the California Landscape. رحال بارکرد. طلاعات بیشتر.

Series: Geographies of Justice and Social Transformation. Perhaps the most surprising thing about the bracero era is how little the California landscape changed over its twenty-two years. Mitchell shows that growers, workers, and officials confronted a series of problems that shaped-and were shaped by-the landscape itself. For growers, the problem was finding the right kind of labor at the right price at the right time.

They Saved the Crops book. The chapters on the bracero program are split up by short 2-3 page examinations of Marxist geography.

landscape: it saved the crops - precisely because it destroyed lives" (p. .

xiv + 529 pp. 50 b&w photos, 5 maps, 6 tables, 3 figures, notes, bibliography, and index. The thesis of They Saved, the Crops is aptly summarized by its final sentence: "A force for destabilization of working people, the bracero program was also a force for the stabilization of the profitable landscape: it saved the crops - precisely because it destroyed lives" (p. 422)

They Saved the Crops: Labor, Landscape, and the Struggle over . Don Mitchell and Nik Heynen, The Geography of Survival and the Right to the City: Speculations on Surveillance, Legal Innovation, and th.

Don Mitchell and Nik Heynen, The Geography of Survival and the Right to the City: Speculations on Surveillance, Legal Innovation, and the Criminalization of Intervention, Urban Geography (Forthcoming). Lynn Staeheli and Don Mitchell, USA’s Destiny?

Book Overview labor relations that had allowed the state to become such a productive farming frontier.

At the outset of World War II, California agriculture seemed to be on the cusp of change.

CHAPTER 2 The Struggle for a Rational Farming Landscape: Worker Housing and Grower Power. Reproduction: Housing Labor Power

Saved in: Bibliographic Details. CHAPTER 2 The Struggle for a Rational Farming Landscape: Worker Housing and Grower Power. Reproduction: Housing Labor Power. CHAPTER 3 The Dream of Labor Power: Fluid Labor and the Solid Landscape. Scale: Infrastructures of Landscape and Labor Markets. CHAPTER 4 Organizing the Landscape: Labor Camps, International Agreements, and the NFLU. Violence: Overt and Structural. CHAPTER 5 The Persistent Landscape: Perpetuating Crisis in California.

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At the outset of World War II, California agriculture seemed to be on the cusp of change. Many Californians, reacting to the ravages of the Great Depression, called for a radical reorientation of the highly exploitative labor relations that had allowed the state to become such a productive farming frontier. But with the importation of the first braceros―“guest workers” from Mexico hired on an “emergency” basis after the United States entered the war―an even more intense struggle ensued over how agriculture would be conducted in the state. Esteemed geographer Don Mitchell argues that by delineating the need for cheap, flexible farm labor as a problem and solving it via the importation of relatively disempowered migrant workers, an alliance of growers and government actors committed the United States to an agricultural system that is, in important respects, still with us.

They Saved the Crops is a theoretically rich and stylistically innovative account of grower rapaciousness, worker militancy, rampant corruption, and bureaucratic bias. Mitchell shows that growers, workers, and officials confronted a series of problems that shaped―and were shaped by―the landscape itself. For growers, the problem was finding the right kind of labor at the right price at the right time. Workers struggled for survival and attempted to win power in the face of economic exploitation and unremitting violence. Bureaucrats tried to harness political power to meet the demands of, as one put it, “the people whom we serve.”

Drawing on a deep well of empirical materials from archives up and down the state, Mitchell’s account promises to be the definitive book about California agriculture in the turbulent decades of the mid-twentieth century.