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eBook Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1860-1870: War and Peace in the Upper South ePub

eBook Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1860-1870: War and Peace in the Upper South ePub

by Stephen V. Ash

  • ISBN: 1572335394
  • Category: Americas
  • Subcategory: History
  • Author: Stephen V. Ash
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Univ Tennessee Press (July 15, 2006)
  • Pages: 328
  • ePub book: 1246 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1648 kb
  • Other: azw doc rtf lit
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 708

Description

Start by marking Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1860-1870 .

Start by marking Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1860-1870: War and Peace in the Upper South as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Originally published in 1988, Middle Tennessee Society Transformed marks a significant advance in the social history of the American Civil War-an approach exemplified and extended in Ash's later work and that of other leading Civil War scholars.

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Originally published in 1988, Middle Tennessee Society Transformed marks a significant advance in the social history of the American Civil War-an approach exemplified and extended in Ash’s later work and that of other leading Civil War scholars.

Stephen V. Ash is associate professor of history at the University of Tennessee and author of Middle Tennessee Transformed, 1860-1870: War and Peace in the Upper South. Jeanette Keith is associate professor of history at Bloomsburg University and the author of Country People in the New South: Tennessee's Upper Cumberland.

War and Peace is a novel by the Russian author Leo Tolstoy, published serially, then in its entirety in 1869. It is regarded as one of Tolstoy's finest literary achievements

War and Peace is a novel by the Russian author Leo Tolstoy, published serially, then in its entirety in 1869. It is regarded as one of Tolstoy's finest literary achievements. The novel chronicles the French invasion of Russia and the impact of the Napoleonic era on Tsarist society through the stories of five Russian aristocratic families. Portions of an earlier version, titled The Year 1805, were serialized in The Russian Messenger from 1865 to 1867, then published in its entirety in 1869. Ash is associate professor of history at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, and managing . His books include Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1860-1870: War and Peace in the Upper South.

His books include Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1860-1870: War and Peace in the Upper South.

American Civil War. Local History. Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1860-70 : War and Peace in the Upper South. We can notify you when this item is back in stock. AbeBooks may have this title (opens in new window). Close X. Learn about new offers and get more deals by joining our newsletter.

Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1860-1870: War and Peace in the Upper South, Louisiana State .

Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1860-1870: War and Peace in the Upper South, Louisiana State University Press (Baton Rouge, LA), 1988. Past Times: A Daybook of Knoxville History, Knoxville News-Sentinel (Knoxville, TN), 1991. Stephen V. Ash, professor of history at the University of Tennessee and Civil War scholar, has written several books detailing various aspects of Southern history, including the Civil War and its effects on Southern lifestyle.

The primary merit of the book lies in the diversity and comprehensiveness of the. entries. In each case, Volkan presents a historical background of the conflict under. January 2007 · The Journal of Military History.

Middle Tennessee Society Transformed, 1860-1870: War and Peace in the Upper South. Kingsport, TN: Kingsport Press, . Thorogood, James E. A Financial History of Tennessee Since 1870. Baton Rouge: LSU Press, 1988. Bergeron, Paul . Stephen Ash, and Jeanette Keith, Tennesseans and Their History.

Originally published in 1988, Middle Tennessee Society Transformed marks a significant advance in the social history of the American Civil War—an approach exemplified and extended in Ash’s later work and that of other leading Civil War scholars. Winner of the Tennessee History Book Award and named by Choice magazine as an Outstanding Academic Book, it examines the Civil War in Middle Tennessee in light of conflict between African Americans and whites, the decline of institutions (churches, schools, courts), and economic disruption. Ash provides a rich description of how a prosperous section of Tennessee descended into devastating internal warfare that in some respects continued for years after the war.For the new edition, Ash has written a preface that takes into account the advance of Civil War historiography since the book’s original appearance. This preface cites subsequent studies focusing not only on race and class but also on women and gender relations, the significance of partisan politics in shaping the course of secession in Tennessee and other upper-South states, the economic forces at work, the influence of republican ideology, and the investigation of the degree to which slaves were active agents in their own emancipation.

Comments

Άνουβις Άνουβις
Ash discusses all aspects of life, economic and social, for both whites and blacks before, during, and after the war. The book is very readable and very interesting. He argues that Middle Tennessee was unique in its economy prior to the war, and the book does focus almost entirely on Middle Tennessee.
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What I expected
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For people interested in the life experience of Southern civilians in the 1860's, Stephen Ash should be a prime resource. And for those interested in the totality of our civil war, there is no better place to gain a view than in Middle Tennessee. In 1860, Middle Tennessee was one of the most prosperous sections of the South, filled with successful, even rich, farms and farmers, many of them slaveholders. However, the people of the area were hardly of one view, and when it fell to Union forces in the spring of 1862, Professor Ash paints a vivid picture of the section's rapid decline into "utter social and institutional anarchy."

One of the debates among historians over the time since this book came out relates to the question, was the Civil War a total war? Regardless how one defines total war, or the conclusion one reaches, this book brings into view one great cost the people of the South paid when they entered into a war that would be lost. They had a stable government and a safe living situation before the war began. When Tennessee left the Union to join a new government, and that government was driven away and destroyed, the real terrors and scourges of war, terror and anarchy, filled the void. Anarchy was just as sharp an instrument of harsh war as were any official Union policies designed to destroy the war-making capability of the Confederacy.

I can here some of you now: "Well, I'm not interested in social history; I wanna read about the real war." If so, heed the words of Gary Gallagher, who hailed this book as a new and necessary sort of military history, "connecting the experiences of soldiers in the field and civilians on the home front ... providing a social context within which to understand military events." War isn't hell? Look here. You'll think otherwise.